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We are connecting unconsciously which promotes intuition and precognition.
02/01/2022

We are connecting unconsciously which promotes intuition and precognition.

The present interdisciplinary study discusses the physical foundations of the neurobiological processes occurring during social interaction. The review of the literature establishes the difference between Intentionality and Intention, thereby proposing the theoretical basis of Shared Intentionality....

28/02/2021

The article studies a gap in current knowledge of the so-called problem of Primary Data Entry (PDE) by reviewing relevant theories on emotional contagion and empirical data. Proceedings of the 11th Eurasian Conference on Language & Social Sciences which is held in Gjakova University, Kosovo. p.226. Retrieved from http://eclss.org/publicationsfordoi/abst11act8boo8k2021a.pdf. The Best Research Paper Award.

New Findings in Education: Primary Data Entry in Shaping Intentionality and Cognition at the COGNITIVE 2021 conference.P...
27/02/2021

New Findings in Education: Primary Data Entry in Shaping Intentionality and Cognition at the COGNITIVE 2021 conference.
Please contact Chair and Coordinator of the PDE special track Igor Val Danilov via messenger.
https://www.iaria.org/conferences2021/COGNITIVE21.html

The COGNITIVE 2021 conference invites researchers and thinkers to discuss one of the most intriguing questions in cognitive science: where does social knowledge come from? When and how the body begins to learn social knowledge.
https://www.iaria.org/conferences2021/COGNITIVE21.html
if you have any questions about participation, please contact Chair and Coordinator of the PDE special track Igor Val Danilov via messenger.

Did YOU know that ...About 75 percent of the brain is made up of water. This means that dehydration, even in small amoun...
07/12/2019

Did YOU know that ...

About 75 percent of the brain is made up of water. This means that dehydration, even in small amounts, can have a negative effect on the brain functions.

Stay Hydrated!

Brain interprets written and spoken language the same wayUsing the imaging data and computer modeling, the team created ...
07/12/2019

Brain interprets written and spoken language the same way

Using the imaging data and computer modeling, the team created detailed maps of brain activity for each participant. These maps indicated that the brain circuits responding to the semantic content of each concept within the stories were almost identical within each individual, regardless of whether people were reading or listening. After discounting the different sensory areas of the brain that process sound and sight, says Gallant, “essentially you can’t tell the difference between the semantic maps.”

The Representation of Semantic Information Across Human Cerebral Cortex During Listening Versus Reading Is Invariant to Stimulus Modality
Fatma Deniz, Anwar O. Nunez-Elizalde, Alexander G. Huth and Jack L. Gallant
2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0675-19.2019

Why Does Time Fly When You're Having Fun?The world's most precise clocks run at a steady pace, messing up by only about ...
07/12/2019

Why Does Time Fly When You're Having Fun?

The world's most precise clocks run at a steady pace, messing up by only about 1 second every 300 million years.
But the brain takes those rhythmic seconds and makes everything different.

One mechanism involves the speed at which brain cells activate one another and form a network when you're performing an activity. The faster those paths of neurons form, the faster we perceive time, Paton and his team have found in their research

A Scalable Population Code for Time in the Striatum
Gustavo B.M. Mello, Sofia Soares, Joseph J. Paton
2015
DOI:doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2015.02.036

Something you didn't know about language formation How did the almost 6000 languages of the world come into being? Resea...
06/12/2019

Something you didn't know about language formation

How did the almost 6000 languages of the world come into being? Researchers from the Leipzig Research Centre for Early Childhood Development at Leipzig University and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology have tried to simulate the process of developing a new communication system in an experiment -- with surprising results: even preschool children can spontaneously develop communication systems that exhibit core properties of natural language.

Manuel Bohn, Gregor Kachel, Michael Tomasello. Young children spontaneously recreate core properties of language in a new modality.
2019
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1904871116

Smart people may learn music faster "The strongest predictor of skill acquisition was intelligence, followed by music ap...
06/12/2019

Smart people may learn music faster

"The strongest predictor of skill acquisition was intelligence, followed by music aptitude," said Alexander Burgoyne, a doctoral candidate in cognition and cognitive neuroscience.
"The results were surprising, because people have claimed that mindset plays an important role when students are confronted with challenges, like trying to learn a new musical instrument," Burgoyne said. "And yet, it didn't predict skill acquisition."
"Our study examined one of the earliest stages of skill acquisition,"
But applied generally, the study's findings may be helpful in education.

Alexander P. Burgoyne, Lauren Julius Harris, David Z. Hambrick. Predicting piano skill acquisition in beginners: The role of general intelligence, music aptitude, and mindset.
2019
DOI: 10.1016/j.intell.2019.101383

Rats are using the same brain region people use to empathize with othersRats exchange information about danger in a reci...
06/12/2019

Rats are using the same brain region people use to empathize with others

Rats exchange information about danger in a reciprocal fashion, and this information transfer is at least partially mediated by a brain region called the anterior cingulate cortex, according to a study published December 5 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology by Christian Keysers of the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues.
"What we observed, was striking," said Christian Keysers. "Without the region that humans use to empathize, the rats were no longer sensitive to the distress of a fellow rat. Our sensitivity to the emotions of others is thus perhaps more similar to that of the rat than many may have thought."

Yingying Han, Rune Bruls, Efe Soyman, Rajat Mani Thomas, Vasiliki Pentaraki, Naomi Jelinek, Mirjam Heinemans, Iege Bassez, Sam Verschooren, Illanah Pruis, Thijs Van Lierde, Nathaly Carrillo, Valeria Gazzola, Maria Carrillo, Christian Keysers. Bidirectional cingulate-dependent danger information transfer across rats.
2019
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000524

Controlling attention with brain wavesThe study found that when subjects learned to suppress alpha waves in one hemisphe...
05/12/2019

Controlling attention with brain waves

The study found that when subjects learned to suppress alpha waves in one hemisphere of their parietal cortex, they were able to pay better attention to objects that appeared on the opposite side of their visual field. This is the first time that this cause-and-effect relationship has been seen, and it suggests that it may be possible for people to learn to improve their attention through neurofeedback.

Yasaman Bagherzadeh et al. Alpha Synchrony and the Neurofeedback Control of Spatial Attention
2019
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.11.001

Machine learning, imaging technique may boost colon cancer diagnosisColorectal cancer is the second most common type of ...
05/12/2019

Machine learning, imaging technique may boost colon cancer diagnosis

Colorectal cancer is the second most common type of cancer worldwide, with about 90 percent of cases occurring in people 50 or older.
Using deep learning, a type of machine learning, researchers used the technique on more than 26,000 individual frames of imaging data from colorectal tissue samples to determine the method's accuracy. Compared with pathology reports, they were able to identify tumors with 100 percent accuracy in this pilot study.

Zeng Y, et al. Real-time colorectal cancer diagnosis using PR-OCT with deep learning.
2019
DOI: 10.7150/thno.40099.

Giant tortoises found to be trainable and to have long memoriesThe experiment was simple—it consisted of training giant ...
05/12/2019

Giant tortoises found to be trainable and to have long memories

The experiment was simple—it consisted of training giant tortoises living in zoos in Austria and Vienna to bite a colored ball affixed to the end of a stick. When they bit the right colored ball, they received a reward. Biting the wrong ball resulted in no reward. The researchers report that all of the tortoises were able to learn this simple task. Then, to test their memory, they presented the tortoises with the same sticks and colored balls 95 days later. The researchers report that all of the tortoises were able to remember their training and pick the right ball. The researchers came back to the zoo nine years later and tested all the tortoises again, and found the same result—every tortoise chose the correct colored ball with no reminders.

Tamar Gutnick et al. The underestimated giants: operant conditioning, visual discrimination and long-term memory in giant tortoises
2019
DOI: 10.1007/s10071-019-01326-6

Researchers use machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brainThe researchers working in The N.1 I...
03/12/2019

Researchers use machine learning tools to reveal how memories are coded in the brain

The researchers working in The N.1 Institute for Health at the National University of Singapore (NUS) discovered that a population of neurons in the brain's frontal lobe contain stable short-term memory information within dynamically-changing neural activity.

This discovery may have far-reaching consequences in understanding how organisms have the ability to perform multiple mental operations simultaneously, such as remembering, paying attention and making a decision, using a brain of limited size.

Aishwarya Parthasarathy, Cheng Tang, Roger Herikstad, Loong Fah Cheong, Shih-Cheng Yen, Camilo Libedinsky. Time-invariant working memory representations in the presence of code-morphing in the lateral prefrontal cortex. 2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12841-y

Deep learning identifies molecular patterns of cancerA new deep-learning algorithm, or in other words Artificial Intelli...
03/12/2019

Deep learning identifies molecular patterns of cancer

A new deep-learning algorithm, or in other words Artificial Intelligence, can quickly and accurately analyse several types of genomic data from colorectal tumours for more accurate classification, which could help improve diagnosis and related treatment options, according to new research published in the journal Life Science Alliance.

Jonathan Ronen, Sikander Hayat, Altuna Akalin. Evaluation of colorectal cancer subtypes and cell lines using deep learning.
2019
DOI: 10.26508/lsa.201900517

Fake news People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social m...
03/12/2019

Fake news

People who repeatedly encounter a fake news item may feel less and less unethical about sharing it on social media, even when they don't believe the information, research indicates.

"We suggest that efforts to fight misinformation should consider how people judge the morality of spreading it, not just whether they believe it," the scientist says

Daniel A. Effron, Medha Raj. Misinformation and Morality: Encountering Fake-News Headlines Makes Them Seem Less Unethical to Publish and Share.
2019
DOI: 10.1177/0956797619887896

A molecule in the brain that causes anxiety Boosting a single molecule in the brain can change "dispositional anxiety," ...
02/12/2019

A molecule in the brain that causes anxiety

Boosting a single molecule in the brain can change "dispositional anxiety," the tendency to perceive many situations as threatening, in nonhuman primates, researchers from the University of California, Davis, and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found. The molecule, neurotrophin-3, stimulates neurons to grow and make new connections.
"Neurotrophin-3 is the first molecule that we've been able to show in a non-human primate to be causally related to anxiety. It's one of potentially many molecules that could have this affect. There could be hundreds or even thousands more," said Fox.

Andrew S. Fox, Tade Souaiaia, Jonathan A. Oler, Rothem Kovner, Jae Mun (Hugo) Kim, Joseph Nguyen, Delores A. French, Marissa Riedel, Eva Fekete, Matthew R. Rabska, Miles E. Olsen, Ethan K. Brodsky, Andrew L. Alexander, Walter F. Block, Patrick H. Roseboom, James A. Knowles, Ned H. Kalin. Dorsal amygdala neurotrophin-3 decreases anxious temperament in primates.
2019
DOI: 10.1016/j.biopsych.2019.06.022

Chemists observe weird quantum tunneling A molecule of ammonia, NH3, typically exists as an umbrella shape, with three h...
02/12/2019

Chemists observe weird quantum tunneling

A molecule of ammonia, NH3, typically exists as an umbrella shape, with three hydrogen atoms fanned out in a nonplanar arrangement around a central nitrogen atom. This umbrella structure is very stable and would normally be expected to require a large amount of energy to be inverted.

However, a quantum mechanical phenomenon called tunneling allows ammonia and other molecules to simultaneously inhabit geometric structures that are separated by a prohibitively high energy barrier.

"It's a beautiful example of the tunneling phenomenon, and it reveals a wonderful strangeness of quantum mechanics," says Field, who is one of the senior authors of the study.

Youngwook Park, Hani Kang, Robert W. Field, Heon Kang. The frequency-domain infrared spectrum of ammonia encodes changes in molecular dynamics caused by a DC electric field.
2019
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1914432116

The difference between an expert's brain and a novice'sIn learning new tasks, neuron networks in the brain of mice becom...
27/11/2019

The difference between an expert's brain and a novice's

In learning new tasks, neuron networks in the brain of mice become more refined and selective. Charting changes in neural activity can help inform the design of better computational models for understanding decision making and cognition.
When mice learn to do a new task, their brain activities change over time as they advance from 'novice' to 'expert.' The changes are reflected in the wiring of cell circuits and activities of neurons.

Farzaneh Najafi, Gamaleldin F. Elsayed, Robin Cao, Eftychios Pnevmatikakis, Peter E. Latham, John P. Cunningham, Anne K. Churchland. Excitatory and Inhibitory Subnetworks Are Equally Selective during Decision-Making and Emerge Simultaneously during Learning.
2019
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuron.2019.09.045

Feeling loved? Than be sure you are very healthy Researchers find that people who experience higher 'felt love', experie...
26/11/2019

Feeling loved? Than be sure you are very healthy

Researchers find that people who experience higher 'felt love', experiences of love and connection in everyday life, also have significantly higher levels of psychological well-being, which includes feelings of purpose and optimism, compared to those who had lower felt love scores.

Zita Oravecz, Jessica Dirsmith, Saeideh Heshmati, Joachim Vandekerckhove, Timothy R. Brick. Psychological well-being and personality traits are associated with experiencing love in everyday life.
2019
DOI: 10.1016/j.paid.2019.109620

What do we know about when when we touch something or someone "Which brain areas are responsible for this perception of ...
26/11/2019

What do we know about when when we touch something or someone

"Which brain areas are responsible for this perception of touch, however, is still largely unknown," says Privatdozent Dr. Burkhard Pleger, neurologist.
However, in the new research the scientists were able to show that not only the somatosensory cortex is involved in the perception of touch, but also parts of the prefrontal cortex and posterior parietal lobe -- brain regions that are known to be essential for attention-focusing and body awareness.

M. Rullmann, S. Preusser, B. Pleger. Prefrontal and posterior parietal contributions to the perceptual awareness of touch. 2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-53637-w

Something new about yourself that you didn't know before Neuroscientists at the Bernstein Center Freiburg (BCF) of the U...
25/11/2019

Something new about yourself that you didn't know before

Neuroscientists at the Bernstein Center Freiburg (BCF) of the University of Freiburg and the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm have understood a significant process in the brain that contributes to the behaviour of living beings. "One of the basic requirements for meaningful behaviour is that networks in the brain produce precisely defined sequences of neuronal activity,".

As a result, the researchers have concluded that learning mechanisms can be developed in order to select for rewarding sequences, thereby making meaningful behaviour possible.

Spreizer S, Aertsen A, Kumar A
From space to time: Spatial inhomogeneities lead to the emergence of spatiotemporal sequences in spiking neuronal networks.
(2019)
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1007432

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the worldIn a circular arena, a fruit fly navigates a virtual landscape ...
25/11/2019

To navigate, flies make flexible mental maps of the world

In a circular arena, a fruit fly navigates a virtual landscape illuminated by black and blue lights. The fly is tethered in place, able to flap its wings but not move its head.
Scientists can actually rewrite the insects' sense of direction by tinkering with their neural compass. And with just a few pieces of visual information, flies can build a new map of their surroundings.

Sung Soo Kim, Ann M. Hermundstad, Sandro Romani, L. F. Abbott, and Vivek Jayaraman. "The generation of stable heading representations in diverse visual scenes,"
2019.
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1767-1
Yvette E. Fisher, Jenny Lu, Isabel D'Alessandro, and Rachel I. Wilson. "Sensorimotor experience remaps visual input to a heading direction network,"
2019.
DOI: 10.1038/s41586-019-1772-4

Quantum computers learn to mark their own workBy creating a protocol that allows a quantum computer to check its own ans...
25/11/2019

Quantum computers learn to mark their own work

By creating a protocol that allows a quantum computer to check its own answers to difficult problems, the scientists from the University of Warwick have provided a means to confirm that a quantum computer is working correctly without excessive use of resources.
Dr. Animesh Datta from the University of Warwick Department of Physics said: "A quantum computer is only useful if it does two things: first, that it solves a difficult problem; the second, which I think is less appreciated, is that it solves the hard problem correctly. If it solves it incorrectly, we had no way of finding out. So what our paper provides is a way of deciding how close the outcome of a computation is to being correct."

Accrediting outputs of noisy intermediate-scale quantum computing devices
Samuele Ferracin, Theodoros Kapourniotis and Animesh Datta
2019
http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/1367-2630/ab4fd6

Boosting 5G technology An Army-funded project may boost 5G and mm-Wave technologies, improving military communications a...
24/11/2019

Boosting 5G technology

An Army-funded project may boost 5G and mm-Wave technologies, improving military communications and sensing equipment.
"With this exciting accomplishment, the timing is ripe to leverage our CMOS-compatible technology for the 5G and mm-Wave defense communication markets," said Carbonics' CEO Kos Galatsis. "We are now engaged in licensing and technology transfer partnerships with industry participants, while we continue to advance this disruptive RF technology."

Christopher Rutherglen, Alexander A. Kane, Philbert F. Marsh, Tyler A. Cain, Basem I. Hassan, Mohammed R. AlShareef, Chongwu Zhou, Kosmas Galatsis. Wafer-scalable, aligned carbon nanotube transistors operating at frequencies of over 100 GHz.
2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41928-019-0326-y

What are the factors that predict success?Characteristics beyond intelligence can factor into someone's ability to succe...
24/11/2019

What are the factors that predict success?

Characteristics beyond intelligence can factor into someone's ability to succeed, according to research. New findings, which come from analyzing data from more than 11,000 West Point cadets, both strengthen early theories about grit and point to other attributes key to long-term achievement.
"This work shows us that grit is not the only determinant of success," Researcher says. "Yes, it's very important, helping people stick with things when they're hard, but it's not the best predictor of every aspect of success."

Angela L. Duckworth, Abigail Quirk, Robert Gallop, Rick H. Hoyle, Dennis R. Kelly, Michael D. Matthews. Cognitive and noncognitive predictors of success.
2019
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1910510116

Music as a universal language Is music really a "universal language"? Two articles in the most recent issue of Science s...
24/11/2019

Music as a universal language

Is music really a "universal language"? Two articles in the most recent issue of Science support the idea that music all around the globe shares important commonalities, despite many differences. Researchers led by Samuel Mehr at Harvard University have undertaken a large-scale analysis of music from cultures around the world. Cognitive biologists Tecumseh Fitch and Tudor Popescu of the University of Vienna suggest that human musicality unites all cultures across the planet.

1. W. Tecumseh Fitch, Tudor Popescu. The world in a song.
2019
DOI: 10.1126/science.aay2214
2. Samuel A. Mehr, Manvir Singh, Dean Knox, Daniel M. Ketter, Daniel Pickens-Jones, S. Atwood, Christopher Lucas, Nori Jacoby, Alena A. Egner, Erin J. Hopkins, Rhea M. Howard, Joshua K. Hartshorne, Mariela V. Jennings, Jan Simson, Constance M. Bainbridge, Steven Pinker, Timothy J. O’Donnell, Max M. Krasnow, Luke Glowacki. Universality and diversity in human song.
2019
DOI: 10.1126/science.aax0868

AI can learn quantum mechanics Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electroni...
23/11/2019

AI can learn quantum mechanics

Artificial Intelligence can be used to predict molecular wave functions and the electronic properties of molecules. This innovative AI method developed by a team of researchers at the University of Warwick, the Technical University of Berlin and the University of Luxembourg, could be used to speed-up the design of drug molecules or new materials.

K. T. Schütt, M. Gastegger, A. Tkatchenko, K.-R. Müller, R. J. Maurer. Unifying machine learning and quantum chemistry with a deep neural network for molecular wavefunctions.
2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41467-019-12875-2

Deep learning to analyze neurological problemsGetting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someo...
23/11/2019

Deep learning to analyze neurological problems

Getting to the doctor's office for a check-up can be challenging for someone with a neurological disorder that impairs their movement, such as a stroke. But what if the patient could just take a video clip of their movements with a smart phone and forward the results to their doctor? Work by Dr Hardeep Ryait and colleagues at CCBN-University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada, publishing November 21 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, shows how this might one day be possible.

Hardeep Ryait, Edgar Bermudez-Contreras, Matthew Harvey, Jamshid Faraji, Behroo Mirza Agha, Andrea Gomez-Palacio Schjetnan, Aaron Gruber, Jon Doan, Majid Mohajerani, Gerlinde A. S. Metz, Ian Q. Whishaw, Artur Luczak. Data-driven analyses of motor impairments in animal models of neurological disorders. PLOS Biology, 2019
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000516

Drinking tea may be good for your brain, a new study saysA recent study led by researchers from the National University ...
23/11/2019

Drinking tea may be good for your brain, a new study says

A recent study led by researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS) revealed that regular tea drinkers have better organised brain regions -- and this is associated with healthy cognitive function -- compared to non-tea drinkers. The research team made this discovery after examining neuroimaging data of 36 older adults.

Junhua Li, Rafael Romero-Garcia, John Suckling, Lei Feng. Habitual tea drinking modulates brain efficiency: evidence from brain connectivity evaluation.
2019;
DOI: 10.18632/aging.102023

Neurons that map memories our brains discovered Neuroengineers have found the first evidence that individual neurons in ...
23/11/2019

Neurons that map memories our brains discovered

Neuroengineers have found the first evidence that individual neurons in the human brain target specific memories during recall. They studied recordings in neurosurgical patients who had electrodes implanted in their brains and examined how the patients' brain signals corresponded to their behavior while performing a virtual-reality object-location memory task. The researchers identified 'memory-trace cells' whose activity was spatially tuned to the location where subjects remembered encountering specific objects.

Salman E. Qasim, Jonathan Miller, Cory S. Inman, Robert E. Gross, Jon T. Willie, Bradley Lega, Jui-Jui Lin, Ashwini Sharan, Chengyuan Wu, Michael R. Sperling, Sameer A. Sheth, Guy M. McKhann, Elliot H. Smith, Catherine Schevon, Joel M. Stein, Joshua Jacobs. Memory retrieval modulates spatial tuning of single neurons in the human entorhinal cortex.
2019;
DOI: 10.1038/s41593-019-0523-z

Electrical stimulation makes an old brain act young A short session of brain zapping can reverse some of the effects of ...
07/11/2019

Electrical stimulation makes an old brain act young

A short session of brain zapping can reverse some of the effects of aging in older adults, a new study suggests.
The technique isn't ready for non-experimental use yet, and it's not clear how long the benefits last. But the study authors said they hope that their findings will set the stage for improving cognition in both healthy adults and in people experiencing Alzheimer's and other types of dementia.

Reinhart, R.M.G., Nguyen, J.A. Working memory revived in older adults by synchronizing rhythmic brain circuits.
(2019) doi:10.1038/s41593-019-0371-x

Forcing remembering things you forgot A new study finds that zapping the brain might boost that memory. After receiving ...
07/11/2019

Forcing remembering things you forgot

A new study finds that zapping the brain might boost that memory. After receiving stimulation in a certain part of the brain, study participants were 15.4% better at recalling memories.
These subjects were better at recalling episodic memories, those that involve a specific time and a place. "In episodic memory, you have contextual detail," said senior author Jesse Rissman.

Anodal Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Left Rostrolateral Prefrontal Cortex Selectively Improves Source Memory Retrieval
doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_01421
Andrew J. Westphal, Tiffany E. Chow, Corey Ngoy, Xiaoye Zuo, Vivian Liao, Laryssa A. Storozuk, Megan A. K. Peters, Allan D. Wu, and Jesse Rissman
(2019)

The “neurosurgical robot” facilitates further research in deep brain stimulationThe application of robot-assisted lead i...
07/11/2019

The “neurosurgical robot” facilitates further research in deep brain stimulation

The application of robot-assisted lead implantation in nonhuman primate neuromodulation research has been deemed feasible, accurate, safe and efficient in a recent study. With multiple methods validating the accuracy and safety of the technique, the authors further postulate that these findings can prospectively be beneficial to neurological studies.
Zhu, Chen and colleagues reiterate that in comparison to traditional techniques, robotic-assisted methods can facilitate more accurate lead positioning, while the use of more flexible adaptors for unique research purposes could reduce complications and save time.

Neurosurgical Robot
Guan-Yu Zhu and Ying-Chuan Chen
(2019)

Proof of consciousness on brain scans By finding a clear brain signature of awareness, the new work “ brings us closer t...
04/11/2019

Proof of consciousness on brain scans

By finding a clear brain signature of awareness, the new work “ brings us closer to understanding what consciousness is,” says study coauthor Jacobo Sitt of INSERM in Paris.
Sitt and his colleagues scrutinized functional MRI data that captured the brain activity of 125 people as they rested inside scanners at research institutes in Paris, New York City and Liège, Belgium. Forty-seven of these people were healthy. The rest had unresponsive wakefulness syndrome

A. Demertzi and others. Human consciousness is supported by dynamic complex patterns of brain signal coordination.
2019
DOI:10.1126/sciadv.aat7603.

Monkeys are better than humans on cognitive flexibility When it comes to being willing to explore more efficient options...
02/11/2019

Monkeys are better than humans on cognitive flexibility

When it comes to being willing to explore more efficient options for solving a problem, monkeys exhibit more cognitive flexibility than humans, according to a study by Georgia State University psychology researchers

Julia Watzek, Sarah M. Pope, Sarah F. Brosnan. Capuchin and rhesus monkeys but not humans show cognitive flexibility in an optional-switch task.
2019
DOI: 10.1038/s41598-019-49658-0

How babies acquire new knowledgeBabies seek to understand the world around them and learn many new things every day. Une...
02/11/2019

How babies acquire new knowledge

Babies seek to understand the world around them and learn many new things every day. Unexpected events -- for example when a ball falls through a table -- provide researchers with the unique opportunity to understand infants' learning processes.

Moritz Köster, Miriam Langeloh, Stefanie Hoehl. Visually Entrained Theta Oscillations Increase for Unexpected Events in the Infant Brain.
2019
DOI: 10.1177/0956797619876260

How memory is changing with years New research could help explain why the memory in old age is much less flexible than i...
02/11/2019

How memory is changing with years

New research could help explain why the memory in old age is much less flexible than in young adulthood. Through experiments in mice, the researchers discovered that there were dramatic differences in how memories were stored in old age, compared to young adulthood.

Wajeeha Aziz, Igor Kraev, Keiko Mizuno, Alastair Kirby, Ton Fang, Huzefa Rupawala, Kamillia Kasbi, Stephanie Rothe, Felix Jozsa, Kobi Rosenblum, Michael G. Stewart, K. Peter Giese. Multi-input Synapses, but Not LTP-Strengthened Synapses, Correlate with Hippocampal Memory Storage in Aged Mice. 2019; DOI: 10.1016/j.cub.2019.08.064

Psychologists see humour as a persons' strength Positive psychology, a field that examines what people do well, notes th...
24/10/2019

Psychologists see humour as a persons' strength

Positive psychology, a field that examines what people do well, notes that humor can be used to make others feel good, to gain intimacy or to help buffer stress. Along with gratitude, hope and spirituality, a sense of humour belongs to the set of strengths positive psychologists call transcendence.
Humour is now into mainstream experimental psychology as a desirable behaviour.

Janet M. Gibson (2016)

Multitasking reduces productivity Multitasking may actually be less efficient--especially for complicated or unfamiliar ...
24/10/2019

Multitasking reduces productivity

Multitasking may actually be less efficient--especially for complicated or unfamiliar tasks--because it takes extra time to shift mental gears every time a person switches between the two tasks.

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Isabel Gauthier, SSN: 0096-1523 (2001) Vol. 27, No. 4

What is Socialisation?It is a learning process, one that involves development or changes in the individual’s sense of se...
24/10/2019

What is Socialisation?

It is a learning process, one that involves development or changes in the individual’s sense of self.
Socialisation is a learning process. When your parents teach you how to use a toilet or behave politely, when your teachers teach you about your country’s history, when a priest teaches you to behave a certain way, you are being socialized. When you are being socialized, you are taking part in a learning process.

Anyon, Jean. 1980. “Social Class and the Hidden Curriculum of Work.”

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