McClements's Laboratory

McClements's Laboratory Our team investigates about food biopolymers, colloids and nanotechnology; oral delivery systems; gastrointestinal fate of nutrients and nutraceuticals.

UMass Amherst-Food Science

AOCS; American Oil Chemists' Society
09/18/2017

AOCS; American Oil Chemists' Society

AOCS Member Ruojie Zhang won first place in June in the Product Development Student Research Paper Poster Competition for the poster, “Encapsulation of lactase (β-galactosidase) into novel hydrogel beads for the effective treatment of lactose intolerance.”

She was also selected to participate in the Journey through Science Day event sponsored by PepsiCo and the New York Academy of Sciences. Only 50 exceptional students from around the world are selected each year for this Journey.

We are proud to have Ruojie as an #AOCSMember and AOCS Student Award winner.

09/18/2017

Effect of the composition and structure of excipient emulsion on the bioaccessibility of pesticides residue in agricultural products

Article in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry · September 2017
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b02607

Abstract
The influence of co-ingestion of food emulsions with tomatoes on the bioaccessibility of a model pesticide (chlorpyrifos) was studied. Emulsions were fabricated with different oil contents (0 to 8%), lipid compositions (MCT and corn oil) and particle diameters (d32 = 0.17 and 10 μm). The emulsions were then mixed with chlorpyrifos-contaminated tomato puree, and the mixtures were subjected to a simulated gastrointestinal tract (GIT) consisting of mouth, stomach, and small intestine. The particle size, surface charge, and microstructure of the emulsions was measured as they passed through the GIT, and chlorpyrifos bioaccessibility was determined after digestion. The composition and structure of the emulsions had a significant impact on chlorpyrifos bioaccessibility. Bioaccessibility increased with increasing oil content, and was higher for corn oil than MCT, but did not strongly depend on oil droplet size. These results suggest that co-ingestion of emulsions with fruits or vegetables could increase pesticide bioaccessibility

09/13/2017

Characterization of binding interaction between rice glutelin and gallic acid: Multi-spectroscopic analyses and computational docking simulation

Article in Food Research International · September 2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodres.2017.09.020

09/13/2017

The effects of preheating and storage temperature on aroma profile and physical properties of citrus-oil emulsions

Article in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry · August 2017
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03270

Abstract
Citrus oils are used as good carrier oil for emulsion fabrication due to their special flavor and various health-promoting functions. In this study, the effects of preheating temperature (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 oC) and storage temperature (4, 25 and 37 oC) on aroma profiles and physical properties of three citrus-oil (i.e. mandarin, sweet orange and bergamot oils) emulsions were systematically investigated for the first time. The results demonstrated the significant impact of temperature on aroma profile and physical properties. The abundance of D-limonene was found to be the main factor determining the aroma of the three citrus-oil emulsions at different preheating and storage temperatures, while β-linalool and linalyl acetate were important for the aroma of bergamot oil emulsion. Preheating temperature showed profound impact on the aroma of citrus-oil emulsions, and the aroma of different citrus oil emulsions showed different sensitivity to the preheating temperature. Storage temperature was also able to alter the properties of citrus oil emulsions. The higher the storage temperature, the more alteration of aroma and more instability of the emulsions, which could be attributed to the alteration of the oil components and the properties of emulsions. Among all three emulsions, bergamot-oil emulsion was the most stable and exhibited the most potent ability to preserve the aroma against high temperature. Our results would facilitate the application of citrus-oil emulsions in functional foods and beverages.

09/13/2017

Development of antimicrobial nanoemulsion-based delivery systems against selected pathogenic bacteria using a thymol rich Thymus daenensis essential oil

Article in Journal of Applied Microbiology · July 2017
DOI: 10.1111/jam.13541

Abstract
Aims: Thymol rich medicinal plants have been used in traditional medicine to relieve infectious diseases. However, the application of essential oils as medicine is limited by its low water-solubility and high vapor pressure. The objective of this study was to produce stable nanoemulsions of Thymus daenensis oil in water by preventing Ostwald ripening and phase separation. Methods & results: The antibacterial activity of bulk and emulsified essential oil against selected pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae) were investigated in the liquid and vapor phase. The optimum formulation (L2) contained 2% Tween 80 (surfactant) and 0.1% lecithin (co-surfactant) had a mean droplet diameter of 131 nm. In the liquid phase, the optimized nanoemulsion exhibited good antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumonia with MIC value of 0.0039 mg/mL. In the vapor phase, the MIC values against Streptococcus pneumonia were similar (

09/10/2017

The effects of preheating and storage temperature on aroma profile and physical properties of citrus-oil emulsions

Article in Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry · August 2017
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jafc.7b03270

Citrus oils are used as good carrier oil for emulsion fabrication due to their special flavor and various health-promoting functions. In this study, the effects of preheating temperature (30, 40, 50, 60, and 70 oC) and storage temperature (4, 25 and 37 oC) on aroma profiles and physical properties of three citrus-oil (i.e. mandarin, sweet orange and bergamot oils) emulsions were systematically investigated for the first time. The results demonstrated the significant impact of temperature on aroma profile and physical properties. The abundance of D-limonene was found to be the main factor determining the aroma of the three citrus-oil emulsions at different preheating and storage temperatures, while β-linalool and linalyl acetate were important for the aroma of bergamot oil emulsion. Preheating temperature showed profound impact on the aroma of citrus-oil emulsions, and the aroma of different citrus oil emulsions showed different sensitivity to the preheating temperature. Storage temperature was also able to alter the properties of citrus oil emulsions. The higher the storage temperature, the more alteration of aroma and more instability of the emulsions, which could be attributed to the alteration of the oil components and the properties of emulsions. Among all three emulsions, bergamot-oil emulsion was the most stable and exhibited the most potent ability to preserve the aroma against high temperature. Our results would facilitate the application of citrus-oil emulsions in functional foods and beverages.

09/10/2017

Development of antimicrobial nanoemulsion-based delivery systems against selected pathogenic bacteria using a thymol rich Thymus daenensis essential oil

Article in Journal of Applied Microbiology · July 2017
DOI: 10.1111/jam.13541

Abstract
Aims: Thymol rich medicinal plants have been used in traditional medicine to relieve infectious diseases. However, the application of essential oils as medicine is limited by its low water-solubility and high vapor pressure. The objective of this study was to produce stable nanoemulsions of Thymus daenensis oil in water by preventing Ostwald ripening and phase separation. Methods & results: The antibacterial activity of bulk and emulsified essential oil against selected pathogenic bacteria including Gram-negative (Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and Gram-positive (Streptococcus pneumoniae) were investigated in the liquid and vapor phase. The optimum formulation (L2) contained 2% Tween 80 (surfactant) and 0.1% lecithin (co-surfactant) had a mean droplet diameter of 131 nm. In the liquid phase, the optimized nanoemulsion exhibited good antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumonia with MIC value of 0.0039 mg/mL. In the vapor phase, the MIC values against Streptococcus pneumonia were similar (

09/07/2017

Influence of pH and cinnamaldehyde on the physical stability and lipolysis of whey protein isolate-stabilized emulsions

Article in Food Hydrocolloids 69:103-110 · August 2017
DOI: 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2017.01.028

Abstract
Cinnamaldehyde (CA), a common hydrophobic flavor, was encapsulated in oil-in-water emulsions that were stabilized by whey protein isolate (WPI). The impact of CA content and pH on the physical stability and lipolysis of the emulsions was then investigated. The presence of CA gave the emulsions a creamy yellow color, which became darker during storage. Emulsions formed using only CA as the oil phase contained large droplets that were physically unstable to particle growth and phase separation. The addition of medium chain triglyceride oil (MCT) improved the stability of emulsions containing CA, which was attributed to inhibition of Ostwald ripening effects. Fluorescent microscopy indicated that the adsorption of the protein to the droplet surfaces led to a thicker adsorbed layer in the presence of CA. The stability of the emulsions to droplet flocculation and coalescence depended on the CA level in the oil phase and the pH of the aqueous phase. An in vitro model was used to assess the impact of oil phase composition and pH on lipid hydrolysis and emulsion microstructure under simulated gastrointestinal tract conditions. The rate of lipid hydrolysis was highly dependent on CA level and pH. These results may facilitate the fabrication of emulsions with controlled GIT fate that are suitable for use in functional foods and beverages.

09/03/2017
Enrichment of Bread with Nutraceutical-Rich Mushrooms: Impact of Auricularia auricula (Mushroom) Flour Upon Quality Attributes of Wheat Dough and Bread: Enrichment of bread with mushrooms… (PDF Download Available)

Abstract
Edible mushrooms contain a variety of bioactive molecules that may enhance human health and wellbeing. Consequently, there is increasing interest in fortifying functional foods with these nutraceutical-rich substances. However, incorporation of mushroom-based ingredients into foods should not adversely affect the quality attributes of the final product. In this study, the impact of incorporating powdered Auricularia auricula, a widely consumed edible mushroom, into bread products was examined. The rheological and structural properties of wheat dough and bread supplemented with 0% to 10% (w/w) A. auricula flour were measured. Supplementation of wheat doughs with A. auricula flour increased the peak viscosity and enhanced their water holding capacity. Rapid viscosity analysis showed that peak and final viscosities of the blended flour (wheat flour with A. auricula flour) were higher than wheat flour alone. However, dough stability and elastic modulus were reduced by blending wheat flour with A. auricula flour. SEM observation showed that doughs with up to 5% (w/w) A. auricula flour had acceptable gluten network microstructure. Characterization of the quality attributes of bread indicated that incorporation of A. auricula flour at levels >5% negatively impacted bread volume, height, texture, and appearance

Enrichment of Bread with Nutraceutical-Rich Mushrooms: Impact of Auricularia auricula (Mushroom) Flour Upon Quality Attributes of Wheat Dough and Bread: Enrichment of bread with mushrooms…. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318757854_Enrichment_of_Bread_with_Nutraceutical-Rich_Mushrooms_Impact_of_Auricularia_auricula_Mushroom_Flour_Upon_Quality_Attributes_of_Wheat_Dough_and_Bread_Enrichment_of_bread_with_mushrooms [accessed Sep 3, 2017].

Official Full-Text Paper (PDF): Enrichment of Bread with Nutraceutical-Rich Mushrooms: Impact of Auricularia auricula (Mushroom) Flour Upon Quality Attributes of Wheat Dough and Bread: Enrichment of bread with mushrooms…

09/03/2017
Encapsulation of omega-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsions and microgels: Impact of delivery system type and protein addition on gastrointestinal fate (PDF Download Available)

Abstract
Carefully designed delivery systems are required to encapsulate and protect omega-3 fatty acids in commercial food and beverage products, but then release them at the required site-of-action within the human gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Previously, we showed that the oxidative stability of flaxseed oil (a plant-based source of omega-3 fatty acids) encapsulated in nanoemulsion droplets or calcium alginate microgels (hydrogel beads) was improved using caseinate as a natural antioxidant. In this study, the impact of caseinate on the digestion of flaxseed oil encapsulated in these delivery systems was investigated using a simulated GIT. The flaxseed oil was incorporated into four delivery systems: nanoemulsions (NE); nanoemulsions mixed with caseinate (NE + C); hydrogel beads (HB); and, hydrogel beads containing caseinate (HB + C). The gastrointestinal fate of the flaxseed oil droplets depended on delivery system type and the presence of protein. The flaxseed oil in the nanoemulsions (NE and NE + C) was rapidly hydrolyzed within the simulated small intestine, with over 76% and 65% of free fatty acids (FFAs) being released in the first 5 minutes, respectively. Conversely, the flaxseed oil in the hydrogel beads (HB and HB + C) was digested much more slowly, with only around 37% and 22% being released in the same period. This knowledge may be useful for designing delivery systems to protect omega-3 fatty acids from oxidation in functional foods, while still allowing them to be released in the GIT.
Encapsulation of omega-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsions and microgels: Impact of delivery system type and protein addition on gastrointestinal fate. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318476463_Encapsulation_of_omega-3_fatty_acids_in_nanoemulsions_and_microgels_Impact_of_delivery_system_type_and_protein_addition_on_gastrointestinal_fate [accessed Sep 1, 2017].

Official Full-Text Paper (PDF): Encapsulation of omega-3 fatty acids in nanoemulsions and microgels: Impact of delivery system type and protein addition on gastrointestinal fate

09/03/2017
Hurdles in Predicting Antioxidant Efficacy in Oil-in-Water Emulsions (PDF Download Available)

Abstract
Numerous compounds exist in nature that can scavenge free radicals and thus have the potential to act as antioxidants in foods. Interest in natural free radical scavengers has resulted in tens of thousands of publications on various molecules and extracts but only an extremely small number have actually been used in commercial applications. The gap between research interest and commercial application is mainly due to the lack of bench top methods that can predict the efficacy of antioxidants in complex food matrices. This disconnection seems to be due to the extremely complex nature of lipid oxidation and antioxidant activity in even relatively simple food systems such as oil-in-water emulsions. This review highlights a number of areas where lack of knowledge is currently holding back our ability to predict which free radical scavengers will be good antioxidants in emulsions: non-free radical scavenging reactions of antioxidants; the existence of different types of oil-water interfaces; difficulties in characterizing lipid droplet surfaces; and differences in oxidation kinetics in different lipid droplets. Further research is needed to identify the key factors that determine antioxidant efficacy in complex heterogeneous systems. This knowledge would then increase our ability to predict how antioxidant structure and properties relate to their activity in food emulsions.
Hurdles in Predicting Antioxidant Efficacy in Oil-in-Water Emulsions. Available from: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318303883_Hurdles_in_Predicting_Antioxidant_Efficacy_in_Oil-in-Water_Emulsions [accessed Sep 1, 2017].

Official Full-Text Paper (PDF): Hurdles in Predicting Antioxidant Efficacy in Oil-in-Water Emulsions

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