College of Natural Sciences at UMass Amherst

College of Natural Sciences at UMass Amherst The College of Natural Sciences at UMass Amherst, excels in interdisciplinary research in the life, environmental, computational, and physical sciences that touches lives.

The College of Natural Sciences excels in world-class research, award-winning teaching, and distinguished outreach and service. Snapchat: cns_umass Our cutting-edge, interdisciplinary research in the life, environmental, computational, and physical sciences touches lives—reducing energy costs, transforming medicine and health care, sustaining our natural resources, and improving the world we live in. Outstanding research and teaching go hand-in-hand in CNS. Our professors are dedicated to effective teaching in the classroom and lab and committed to mentoring undergraduate and graduate students pursuing independent research. Our students are high achievers in and out of the classroom. CNS students receive Goldwater and Fulbright awards on an annual basis, engage in a wide range of academic and social leadership activities, and have a high level of participation in Commonwealth College—33 percent of our seniors graduate with honors.

Operating as usual

Researchers at UMass Amherst have gained new insight into a deadly fungus that is responsible for devastating frog popul...
02/12/2021
News: UMass Amherst Researchers Gain Insight Into the Biology of a Deadly Fungus | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Researchers at UMass Amherst have gained new insight into a deadly fungus that is responsible for devastating frog populations worldwide.

The team, led by cell biologist Lillian Fritz-Laylin, published a paper which describes how the actin networks of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) also serve as an "evolutionary Rosetta Stone," revealing the loss of cytoskeletal complexity in the fungal kingdom.

To read the full story, visit umass.science/amphibian

Bd’s actin structures likely play roles in causing skin disease threatening amphibians worldwide

Assistant Professors of Geoscience at UMass Amherst, Brian Yellen and Jon Woodruff contribute to research findings that ...
02/04/2021
News: UMass Amherst Researchers Discover Low Sediment Levels Behind Dams in Northeast US | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Assistant Professors of Geoscience at UMass Amherst, Brian Yellen and Jon Woodruff contribute to research findings that will be instrumental to local river restoration and wetlands conservation efforts!

Along with David Ralston of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute (WHOI), the researchers examined river sediment levels and discovered important facts about how removal of these dams will impact wildlife and restoration efforts.

To read more, visit http://umass.science/hudsonriverdam

#geoscience #science #riverrestoration

Research findings will be instrumental to local river restoration and wetlands conservation efforts

Now in 3D- Dinosaur cloaca, the world's oldest all-purpose orifice! Featured in the New York Times, CNS biologist Diane ...
02/02/2021
News: Now in 3D— dinosaur cloaca, the world’s oldest all-purpose orifice | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Now in 3D- Dinosaur cloaca, the world's oldest all-purpose orifice!

Featured in the New York Times, CNS biologist Diane Kelly explains the unusual nature of Psittacosaurus's multi-functional orifice and the importance of the newly reconstructed three-dimensional model.

To read more, click the link below.

#science #dinosaur #biology

Featured in the New York Times, CNS biologist Diane Kelly explains the unusual nature of Psittacosaurus’s multi-functional orifice and the importance of the newly reconstructed three-dimensional model

Defying the laws of physics ーin the cosmos! Daniel Wang, Astronomy, has observed new evidence that may explain why jet l...
01/29/2021

Defying the laws of physics ーin the cosmos!

Daniel Wang, Astronomy, has observed new evidence that may explain why jet like x-ray features seem to contradict the laws of physics.

Wang presented a paper featuring information gathered with NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory. He says his new evidence and analysis supports one particular theory of how such jets manifest their strange behavior.

To learn more about his theory, visit umass.science/jets

UMass researchers have discovered COVID-19 antibodies in a group of breastfeeding women. But more research is needed to ...
01/25/2021
News: COVID-19 antibodies found in new moms' early breastmilk | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

UMass researchers have discovered COVID-19 antibodies in a group of breastfeeding women. But more research is needed to better understand how breastmilk may help protect babies from infection and how it will react to the vaccine.

If you’re a new mom who has a current COVID infection, a positive COVID-19 test and are breastfeeding babies less than five months old, you could help researchers understand the long-term impact of the virus and its antibodies on breastfeeding.

More information and links in the story!

A team of UMass scientists discover SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in early breastmilk and seek to recruit new breastfeeding women for further study

CNS Dean Tricia Serio has been named associate chancellor of strategic academic planning by Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy...
01/22/2021

CNS Dean Tricia Serio has been named associate chancellor of strategic academic planning by Chancellor Kumble Subbaswamy.

Serio will oversee the academic planning exercise of refreshing college-level strategic plans in collaboration with the Office of University Analytics and Institutional Research, as well as develop and facilitate strategic intercollege collaboration in research and education.

Congrats Dean Serio!

Read more here: http://umass.science/deanserio

Too much doom and gloom makes people tune out and not take action. But Ezra Markowitz in our environmental conservation ...
01/22/2021
News: Communicating in crisis— creating narratives that inspire change | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Too much doom and gloom makes people tune out and not take action. But Ezra Markowitz in our environmental conservation department has found four ways we can do better in communicating crisis events.

Read them here: http://umass.science/crisistalk

Featured in the Washington Post, CNS researcher examines how we talk about crises and offers tips to better our narratives and inspire change

Tidal marshes along the Hudson River have a complicated past! UMass Amherst geologist Brian Yellen and his team studied ...
01/15/2021
News: Unintended resilience— how humans accidentally created coastline protection | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Tidal marshes along the Hudson River have a complicated past!

UMass Amherst geologist Brian Yellen and his team studied marshes from Wall Street to Albany and found that more than half of the Hudson River’s tidal marshes were created accidentally by humans!

The rate at which Hudson River Estuary marshes are growing suggests that they would be resilient against accelerated sea level rise in the future. One might say they are stemming the tide of climate change 😉

To learn more, visit umass.science/hudson

#geology #science #climatechange

New study documents the benefits of Hudson River tidal marshes inadvertently created by early industrial development

UMass Amherst’s Andy Danylchuk, environmental conservation, and his Ph.D. student Bryan Legare recently joined other sha...
01/13/2021
News: The New England White Shark Research Consortium— an unparalleled joint-effort to understand this crucial apex predator | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

UMass Amherst’s Andy Danylchuk, environmental conservation, and his Ph.D. student Bryan Legare recently joined other shark research groups and government agencies from the northeastern United States and Canada in the New England White Shark Research Consortium (NEWSRC).

It is the first-ever collaboration to jointly study the white shark throughout its entire northeast range!

To learn more, visit umass.science/shark

Danylchuk Lab joins the first-ever regional collaboration to deepen our understanding of the white sharks that pass through New England waters

Solving the two-thousand-year-old mystery of liver regeneration  UMass embryologist Kim Tremblay has received a five-yea...
01/11/2021
News: Solving the two-thousand-year-old mystery of liver regeneration | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Solving the two-thousand-year-old mystery of liver regeneration

UMass embryologist Kim Tremblay has received a five-year, $1.4 million grant from the NIH’s National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases to investigate how the organ can replace itself so quickly.

Tremblay’s research will explore how hepatic cell types are formed in utero, and to identify what cells are involved in regeneration.

To learn more, visit umass.science/liver

UMass embryologist to investigate the liver’s exceptional ability to replace dead or injured cells, exploring how this emerges during embryonic development

Heating up! — UMass polymer scientist Reika Katsumata has received a grant that will support her investigations into bri...
01/08/2021

Heating up! — UMass polymer scientist Reika Katsumata has received a grant that will support her investigations into bridging polymer science and engineering by better understanding how different sized molecules move in relation to each other when heated.

The five-year, $595,000 grant comes from the prestigious 2021 Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) award, given out by the National Science Foundation.

To encourage creative thinking and exploration into less well-known materials in her field, Katsumata plans to design a new course as part of her NSF project!

To read more, visit umass.science/reika

To learn more about Reika’s research group, visit umass.science/katsumata

Professor Charlie Schweik of the UMass Amherst School of Public Policy and the Department of Environmental Conservation ...
01/07/2021

Professor Charlie Schweik of the UMass Amherst School of Public Policy and the Department of Environmental Conservation has been elected the next president of the International Association for the Study of the Commons, or IASC.

IASC is the leading professional organization devoted to “the commons,” which it defines as “a broad set of resources, natural and cultural, that are shared by many people,” from forests and groundwater to the “knowledge commons,” such as digital resources that are collectively owned and managed via the internet.

To learn more, visit umass.science/commonspresident

Getting back to their roots — UMass Amherst researchers celebrate years of restoration and a green exit strategy for far...
01/06/2021
News: 'Re-wilded'— Transforming Massachusetts cranberry bogs back into wetlands | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Getting back to their roots — UMass Amherst researchers celebrate years of restoration and a green exit strategy for farmers.

The Massachusetts Division of Ecological Restoration’s Cranberry Bog Program released its report this month recounting a decade of restoring former cranberry bogs to wetlands.

Research hydrogeologist Christine Hatch and her UMass Amherst students are set to continue monitoring the “re-wilded” ecosystems and collecting data for years to come!

To read more, visit umass.science/hatch

CNS researchers celebrate years of restoration and continue crucial data collection to help shape future projects

Wishing you a happy and healthy holiday from the College of Natural Sciences!
12/24/2020

Wishing you a happy and healthy holiday from the College of Natural Sciences!

The solar opportunities are endless! The Department of Energy has selected a team led by UMass Amherst extension profess...
12/24/2020
News: Understanding the impact of dual-use solar-agriculture installations in Massachusetts | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

The solar opportunities are endless!

The Department of Energy has selected a team led by UMass Amherst extension professor Dwayne Breger for a three-year, $1.8 million award to study the effects of co-locating solar energy panels and agriculture operations at up to eight different farms across the Commonwealth.

Their research will help farmers and communities make informed decisions about the solar opportunities that are coming their way!

To learn more, visit umass.science/solarfarm

UMass Amherst study aims to provide more science-based information on the effects of the solar approach to agricultural productivity for the Massachusetts's farming community

To those that have donated to the CNS Graduate Student Fellowship Fund, thank you for your continued support! Your gift ...
12/23/2020

To those that have donated to the CNS Graduate Student Fellowship Fund, thank you for your continued support! Your gift will change the lives of countless people, and enable graduate students to continue their incredible research at the university! We appreciate you❤️

If you would like to make a donation to support graduate students who have had to put their work on hold for COVID-19, you can do it at umass.science/giving

UMass researchers have figured out how to reduce virus transmission while in a car with another person during the pandem...
12/21/2020

UMass researchers have figured out how to reduce virus transmission while in a car with another person during the pandemic!
🚗
Your first instinct may be to open the window closest to you, but that isn’t the safest option...
🚗
In a paper written for the journal Science Advances, lead author and assistant professor of Physics Varghese Mathai finds that opening the windows farthest from the driver and backseat passenger are the safest to open.
🚗
The research was done with ride-sharing apps like Uber and Lyft in mind. It is modeled after a non-commercial commute where the driver and the passenger are seated as far apart as possible.
🚗
To learn about the science behind this, visit umass.science/rideshare

Attention undergrad and graduate students!The Pioneer Valley Microbiology Symposium is an annual, graduate student led s...
12/21/2020
Valley Microbes 2020 - Connecting the microbes of the Happy Valley

Attention undergrad and graduate students!

The Pioneer Valley Microbiology Symposium is an annual, graduate student led symposium in the Microbiology Department and is inviting both undergraduates and graduate students across all departments to share their research as it pertains to microbes!

PVMS21 will be held virtually on January 29th, 2021. The abstract submission deadline is 12/21 and the registration deadline is 12/31. The 1-day conference will be free of charge. Prizes for best oral and poster presentations will be awarded!

To submit your abstract or to register visit umass.science/pvms

PVMS 2021 October 27, 2020valleymicrobes Leave a Comment PVMS 2021: SAVE THE DATE! VALLEYMICROBES/LEAVE A COMMENT We are happy to announce that PVMS is back ! and we are going ‘virtual’ this year. The next iteration of our symposium will be held online on January 29, 2021.  Interested potentia...

To mark the start of winter and the sun reaching its southern most point, UMass Astronomers are giving live online prese...
12/18/2020

To mark the start of winter and the sun reaching its southern most point, UMass Astronomers are giving live online presentations from the Sunwheel, free of charge and open to the public!

The presentations will be held at 7:15am and 3:45pm on December 21st, 2020.

The astronomers will also provide tips on observing the close conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn on the evening of the solstice, Dec. 21. It will be the closest visible alignment of these two planets in almost 800 years!

For more information, visit umass.science/wintersunwheel

Longtime alumni supporters, Richard and Barbara Mahoney (‘55), have contributed $100,000 to CNS graduate students hit ha...
12/18/2020

Longtime alumni supporters, Richard and Barbara Mahoney (‘55), have contributed $100,000 to CNS graduate students hit hardest by pandemic.

Our grad students have played major roles in ground-breaking research including capturing the first image of a black-hole for the first time in history, creating an app to help farmers more efficiently grow crops, and finding new species of animals. The contribution will help CNS students to continue accomplishing amazing feats just like those.

To learn more, visit umass.science/mahoney

UMass CNS scientists Triantafillos Mountziaris, Alice Y. Cheung, and emeritus professor James V. Staros have been named ...
12/17/2020

UMass CNS scientists Triantafillos Mountziaris, Alice Y. Cheung, and emeritus professor James V. Staros have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)!

AAAS was founded in 1848 and includes more than 250 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. It is the world’s largest general scientific society and publisher of the journal Science.

To read more visit umass.science/aaas

CNS graduate students put in thousands of hours running experiments, collecting data, and analyzing findings. They are a...
12/17/2020

CNS graduate students put in thousands of hours running experiments, collecting data, and analyzing findings. They are an integral part of the research that goes on at UMass, and they need your help!

Contributions to our CNS Graduate Student Fellowship Fund will provide our students with the resources to complete their research despite setbacks caused by COVID-19.

More here: umass.science/giving

Trust your gut — sugars found in our gut could be the key to treating autoimmune diseases!  UMass Immunologist Barbra Os...
12/17/2020
News: New promising findings could lead to a treatment for autoimmune diseases | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

Trust your gut — sugars found in our gut could be the key to treating autoimmune diseases!

UMass Immunologist Barbra Osborne and her team have received two new grants to continue studying exopolysaccharide, a sugar found in our gut microbiome.

Preliminary data from their research shows that the introduction of exopolysaccharide suppresses autoimmune response in mice models with Multiple Sclerosis. The introduction of the purified version of the sugar prevented paralysis in the mice!

To learn more visit umass.science/sugar

Immunologist Barbara Osborne and team receive two new grants to continue studying exopolysaccharide, a sugar found in our gut microbiome, in hopes of developing a new treatment for autoimmune diseases

Piecing together the Alaskan coastline’s fractured past!Research started at UMass Amherst by Xiaotao Yang has revealed t...
12/15/2020

Piecing together the Alaskan coastline’s fractured past!

Research started at UMass Amherst by Xiaotao Yang has revealed that the seismic activity in and around Alaska is much more complex than scientists previously thought.

Yang describes that the central Alaskan region was previously thought to one simple subduction plate. Research shows there are actually two major subduction plates making it an ideal place to study subduction segmentation and its correlation to volcano distribution!

To read more, visit umass.science/alaskan

UMass Amherst agricultural sciences again ranked among the top five in global rankings by U.S. News!For the second year ...
12/14/2020
News: UMass Amherst Agricultural Sciences Again Ranked Among The Top Five in Global Rankings by U.S. News | College of Natural Sciences | UMass Amherst

UMass Amherst agricultural sciences again ranked among the top five in global rankings by U.S. News!

For the second year in a row, the Best Global Universities guide published by U.S. News and World Report ranks the University of Massachusetts Amherst No. 4 in the comprehensive subject area of Agricultural Sciences for 2021, and first among U.S. universities in that subject area.

To learn more visit umass.science/agsciences

For the second year in a row, the Best Global Universities guide published by U.S. News and World Report ranks the University of Massachusetts Amherst No. 4 in the comprehensive subject area of Agricultural Sciences for 2021, and first among U.S. universities in that subject area. The rankings consi...

Brain Freeze ー UMass food science students concoct interesting ice cream flavors for Herrell Ice Cream’s annual flavor c...
12/14/2020

Brain Freeze ー UMass food science students concoct interesting ice cream flavors for Herrell Ice Cream’s annual flavor contest!

The winning flavors are: Cantina Margarita and Ube (tied for first place), Magic Wings and Salt Bae (tied for second place), and Just Peachy, Pepper Storm and Sunday Brunch.

The new flavors are available for purchase at Herrell’s ice cream shop in Northampton, Ma!

To learn more visit umass.science/icecream

Particle physicist Andrea Pocar and a team of international scientists have found evidence that the carbon-nitrogen-oxyg...
12/11/2020

Particle physicist Andrea Pocar and a team of international scientists have found evidence that the carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) fusion-cycle—usually present in very heavy and hot stars-- is at work in our sun. “Confirmation of CNO burning in our sun, where it operates at only one percent, reinforces our confidence that we understand how stars work.”

As explained by Pocar, “The CNO cycle is the dominant energy source powering stars heavier than the sun, but it had so far never been directly detected in any star.”

The photo is of the Borexino Detector; a real-time detector for solar neutrinos specifically Be-7 neutrino flux from the Sun.

Read more at umass.science/pocar

Address


Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when College of Natural Sciences at UMass Amherst posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Videos

Nearby universities