Ohio University Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse

Ohio University  Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse Greenhouse and garden facilities for the Department of Environmental and Plant Biology at Ohio University
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The greenhouse was constructed in 1972. The facility consists of a 4,176 square-foot greenhouse with an attached 1,250 square-foot headhouse and storage area. The adjacent garden was established in 1979 and contains a large variety of plants with seating areas to enjoy the scenery. The greenhouse contains a range of plants and has collections of economically important plants, succulents, ferns, carnivorous plants and many others. Harold Blazier has served as the Greenhouse Manager since 1989 and has over 19 prior years of commercial experience in the field. Harold has a fondness for carnivorous plants and corpse flowers. In addition to his duties as greenhouse manager, Harold also teaches courses in Plant Propagation (PBIO 305), Greenhouse Experience (PBIO 313) and mentors undergraduate work study and graduate students at Ohio University.

Mission: To provide a plant collection that serves the interest of students, faculty, and staff of the Department of Environmental and Plant Biology and the broader Ohio University community.

For anyone in our area or a PBS affiliate in another area:A plug for the greenhouse Carnivorous Plant collection!Here is...
05/03/2017
'Plants Behaving Badly' to Premiere on WOUB-HD May 2, May 10 - WOUB Digital

For anyone in our area or a PBS affiliate in another area:
A plug for the greenhouse Carnivorous Plant collection!

Here is a link to the article and some other information shared by Emily Votaw of WOUB Public Media:

https://woub.org/2017/05/02/plants-behaving-badly-to-premiere-on-woub-hd-may-2-may-10/

Plants Behaving Badly is a two-part series on WOUB-HD.
WOUB can be viewed via different delivery services:
OTA – OVER-THE-AIR (antenna):
20.1 is WOUB-HD (serves the Athens and Southeast Ohio area)
44.1 is WOUC-HD (serves the Cambridge area and parts of northeast Ohio)
Spectrum (Time/Warner) in the city of Athens:
WOUB is on Channel 2
WOUB is on Channel 1002 on the HD tier
WOUB is NOT available on Direct TV nor DISH TV in Athens.
WOUB is available on Direct TV in the Columbus area.
WOUC is available on Direct TV in Cambridge.
WOUC is available on DISH-TV in the Cambridge area.

After the broadcast, the program will probably be available online at the PBS website. There is a link from woub.org to the PBS video website.
#101 airs Wednesday, May 3 at 10pm.
The behavior of carnivorous plants, which have been a feature of many a sci-fi films, are examined.
#102 airs Wednesday, May 10 at 10pm
Revel in the beauty of orchids and examine their flowers, which are shaped to attract pollinators.

Ohio University greenhouse manager Harold Blazier handles the green and crimson speckled, fleshy body of a pitcher plant’s signature pitfall trap on a humid afternoon in early May with a precise gentleness. He points to a bobbing pool of liquid visible through the thin plant membrane walls. “That’s…

Mentha spicata is a variation of mint originating from most parts of Europe and Asia. Its common name “spearmint” was de...
02/15/2017

Mentha spicata is a variation of mint originating from most parts of Europe and Asia. Its common name “spearmint” was derived from the fact that the plant grows leaves resembling a spearhead. Spearmint also produces flowers, either pink or white, that grow as thin spikes. Spearmint can grow in many climates and environments which is why it is known to be an invasive species. Its distinct smell and taste comes from its contents of menthol and menthone that are often used in products such as toothpaste, gum and tea. In addition to its commercial uses, spearmint is also said to have many health benefits. These benefits include headache relief and digestive health, as well as the ability to fight the effects of food poisoning.
- Jacob Snow
Class of 2019
Business Management and Information Systems

Introducing a new album posting to our greenhouse page! As part of the requirement for the course PBIO 3160 Horticultural Management and Techniques the students are required to select a plant or plant group and write a short, informative piece about their topic. Hopefully, we will be adding a weekly posting until the end of the calendar year. The selected material will be something found growing on-site in the teaching collection of the greenhouse or garden area that interests them. This course enrolls both majors and non-majors, as will be indicated in their signatures. The students may approach the topic in a manner of their choosing: fun facts, aesthetics, use, habitat, research, care and maintenance, etc.
H.W.Blazier - Instructor, Kelsey Bryant – TA Fall Semester 2016 - 2017
Following is the official Catalog Course Description:
Applied techniques course; emphasis on care and maintenance of plant material, greenhouse structures, and display garden areas; involves student with hands-on practical experience of growing and care of selected plants found in horticultural applications; daily upkeep and maintenance of a greenhouse facility; care and maintenance of display garden area, aesthetics of planning, design and planting; pest identification and management strategies; develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition fundamentals.

Myrmecophytes are plants that have mutualistic relationships with ant colonies. In tropical climates, these plants provi...
01/13/2017

Myrmecophytes are plants that have mutualistic relationships with ant colonies. In tropical climates, these plants provide living spaces for the ant colonies, while the ants defend the plant from herbivory. According to Blatrix et al. (2009), the places that ant colonies live are called domatia and may include stems, thorns, stipules, petioles or leaves. Interestingly enough these plants do not just house their ant counterparts, they actually have developed “extrafloral” nectars and food stuffs for the ants to collect and feed upon. Recently, researchers have found that of the many ant-plant species they have studied, around 95% of them have some sort of symbiotic fungal presence (Blatrix et al. 2009).
These amazing plants which include several acacias and various Cecropia trees, are a very clear demonstration of coevolution that benefits each organism immensely.
- Brian Fogel
Class of 2019
Political Science Major

Introducing a new album posting to our greenhouse page! As part of the requirement for the course PBIO 3160 Horticultural Management and Techniques the students are required to select a plant or plant group and write a short, informative piece about their topic. Hopefully, we will be adding a weekly posting until the end of the calendar year. The selected material will be something found growing on-site in the teaching collection of the greenhouse or garden area that interests them. This course enrolls both majors and non-majors, as will be indicated in their signatures. The students may approach the topic in a manner of their choosing: fun facts, aesthetics, use, habitat, research, care and maintenance, etc.
H.W.Blazier - Instructor, Kelsey Bryant – TA Fall Semester 2016 - 2017
Following is the official Catalog Course Description:
Applied techniques course; emphasis on care and maintenance of plant material, greenhouse structures, and display garden areas; involves student with hands-on practical experience of growing and care of selected plants found in horticultural applications; daily upkeep and maintenance of a greenhouse facility; care and maintenance of display garden area, aesthetics of planning, design and planting; pest identification and management strategies; develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition fundamentals.

Codiaeum variegatum, commonly known as a Croton, is a beautiful tropical plant that can translate to a great house plant...
01/03/2017

Codiaeum variegatum, commonly known as a Croton, is a beautiful tropical plant that can translate to a great house plant with proper care. Crotons are native to Indonesia, Malaysia and Australia. There are many different varieties and species of Crotons but the majority of them have a beautiful array of vibrant, warm-colored foliage. Its leaves can be round, linear, spiraled, or crinkled; they can come in all shapes and sizes. While Crotons flourish in their native tropical environment, they can be a bit temperamental when bringing them inside. They need very bright light but water seems to be the biggest issue for those who want to have a Croton indoors. Water too little you will have leaf loss; water too much you will also lose leaves. Most experienced plant people will easily find a good equilibrium but this can be a problem for beginners. You want to keep the soil moist but not too moist. While I said moist, I DO NOT MEAN SOGGY. If you find the right balance, your Croton will thrive in a bright warm place leaving you to enjoy its beautiful red, orange, yellow, and pink foliage!
- Nick Sobecki
Class of 2016
Applied Plant Biology

Introducing a new album posting to our greenhouse page! As part of the requirement for the course PBIO 3160 Horticultural Management and Techniques the students are required to select a plant or plant group and write a short, informative piece about their topic. Hopefully, we will be adding a weekly posting until the end of the calendar year. The selected material will be something found growing on-site in the teaching collection of the greenhouse or garden area that interests them. This course enrolls both majors and non-majors, as will be indicated in their signatures. The students may approach the topic in a manner of their choosing: fun facts, aesthetics, use, habitat, research, care and maintenance, etc.
H.W.Blazier - Instructor, Kelsey Bryant – TA Fall Semester 2016 - 2017
Following is the official Catalog Course Description:
Applied techniques course; emphasis on care and maintenance of plant material, greenhouse structures, and display garden areas; involves student with hands-on practical experience of growing and care of selected plants found in horticultural applications; daily upkeep and maintenance of a greenhouse facility; care and maintenance of display garden area, aesthetics of planning, design and planting; pest identification and management strategies; develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition fundamentals.

Ohio University  Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse's cover photo
12/28/2016

Ohio University Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse's cover photo

Ohio University  Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse
12/28/2016

Ohio University Plant Biology Dept. Greenhouse

Orchid flowers typically have three petals and three sepals. However, there is a vast variety of different flower forms,...
12/20/2016

Orchid flowers typically have three petals and three sepals. However, there is a vast variety of different flower forms, which appear to be adaptations that reflect the diversity of insects that pollinate orchids. The stems of epiphytic orchids are swollen at the base to form a pseudobulb for food storage. Their aerial roots absorb water and sometimes contain chlorophyll, allowing them to photosynthesize. The roots of terrestrial orchids often form symbiotic relationships with fungi. Horticulturists have found that seed germination requires the presence of particular types of fungi. About one hundred and forty species of orchids are native to North America. The ladyslipper orchid is a native species found in our region.
- Ellie Andrews
Class of 2016
Plant Biology

Introducing a new album posting to our greenhouse page! As part of the requirement for the course PBIO 3160 Horticultural Management and Techniques the students are required to select a plant or plant group and write a short, informative piece about their topic. Hopefully, we will be adding a weekly posting until the end of the calendar year. The selected material will be something found growing on-site in the teaching collection of the greenhouse or garden area that interests them. This course enrolls both majors and non-majors, as will be indicated in their signatures. The students may approach the topic in a manner of their choosing: fun facts, aesthetics, use, habitat, research, care and maintenance, etc.
H.W.Blazier - Instructor, Kelsey Bryant – TA Fall Semester 2016 - 2017
Following is the official Catalog Course Description:
Applied techniques course; emphasis on care and maintenance of plant material, greenhouse structures, and display garden areas; involves student with hands-on practical experience of growing and care of selected plants found in horticultural applications; daily upkeep and maintenance of a greenhouse facility; care and maintenance of display garden area, aesthetics of planning, design and planting; pest identification and management strategies; develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition fundamentals.

It may sound a little weird, but have you ever just taken a bite out of a lemon or a lime like you do an apple or orange...
12/13/2016

It may sound a little weird, but have you ever just taken a bite out of a lemon or a lime like you do an apple or orange? Probably not. But if you haven't, with the help of one of these small small fruits, it completely changes the experience that you would expect from biting in a sour citrus fruit like that. Synsepalum dulcificum, or Miracle Fruit as it is commonly known, contains a very interesting chemical compound called miraculin. As a glycoprotein, this chemical binds to the taste buds when the fleshy part of the fruit is eaten. Once the chemical has bound to your tongue, sour things that you eat after become sweet. I found it quite peculiar, until one day while I was working in the greenhouse at Ohio University I tried this myself and it worked like magic. The plant originates in West Africa, where an interestingly new demand for the plant has opened regarding chemotherapy. Apparently the consumption of the fruit has become popular amongst cancer patients because the miraculin takes away a metallic taste that is produced from receiving chemo.
- Alexander Greff
Class of 2018
Applied Plant Biology

Nepenthes bicalcarata or the fanged pitcher plant is a species of carnivorous plants that come from Borneo. Borneo is an...
12/06/2016

Nepenthes bicalcarata or the fanged pitcher plant is a species of carnivorous plants that come from Borneo. Borneo is an island that houses portions of Malaysia, Indonesia, and the small nation of Brunei. All pitcher plants have modified leaves that bear the resemblance of pitchers, hence the name. These pitchers are designed to trap insects and in the larger pitchers, small mammals and reptiles. These are then digested by enzymes in the fluid at the bottom of the pitcher. The fanged pitcher plant sports two “fangs” which drip nectar into the pitcher below and are thought to attract insects and other creatures for the pitcher to digest.
- Caroline Siegert
HTC Environmental and Plant Biology
Class of 2019

11/29/2016

Click on the video to see Mimosa pudica in action!
Mimosa pudica, also known by its common names – sensitive plant, touch-me-not plant, and shameful plant, is a prickly perennial herbaceous plant. This plant has the ability to move on its own! When the plant is touched or senses movement around it, the leaves fold inwards and the branches move downward. It is thought that Mimosa pudica’s unique movement is a defense against herbivory. It also closes its leaves at night as a reaction to the absence of light. The flowers of Mimosa pudica are, for lack of more scientific terms, pink or lilac fluff balls that one might expect to see in a Dr. Seuss book.
- Lyndsey Maruna
Environmental Biology
Class of 2017

Mimosa pudica, also known by its common names – sensitive plant, touch-me-not plant, and shameful plant, is a prickly pe...
11/28/2016

Mimosa pudica, also known by its common names – sensitive plant, touch-me-not plant, and shameful plant, is a prickly perennial herbaceous plant. This plant has the ability to move on its own! When the plant is touched or senses movement around it, the leaves fold inwards and the branches move downward. It is thought that Mimosa pudica’s unique movement is a defense against herbivory. It also closes its leaves at night as a reaction to the absence of light. The flowers of Mimosa pudica are, for lack of more scientific terms, pink or lilac fluff balls that one might expect to see in a Dr. Seuss book.
- Lyndsey Maruna
Environmental Biology
Class of 2017

Introducing a new album posting to our greenhouse page! As part of the requirement for the course PBIO 3160 Horticultural Management and Techniques the students are required to select a plant or plant group and write a short, informative piece about their topic. Hopefully, we will be adding a weekly posting until the end of the calendar year. The selected material will be something found growing on-site in the teaching collection of the greenhouse or garden area that interests them. This course enrolls both majors and non-majors, as will be indicated in their signatures. The students may approach the topic in a manner of their choosing: fun facts, aesthetics, use, habitat, research, care and maintenance, etc.
H.W.Blazier - Instructor, Kelsey Bryant – TA Fall Semester 2016 - 2017
Following is the official Catalog Course Description:
Applied techniques course; emphasis on care and maintenance of plant material, greenhouse structures, and display garden areas; involves student with hands-on practical experience of growing and care of selected plants found in horticultural applications; daily upkeep and maintenance of a greenhouse facility; care and maintenance of display garden area, aesthetics of planning, design and planting; pest identification and management strategies; develop a basic understanding of plant nutrition fundamentals.

11/15/2016
Firecracker seeds

Firecracker seeds exhibiting explosive dehiscence dispersal.
See following post of PBIO #3160 album for more information about this plant.

The firecracker flower, or Crossandra infundibuliformis, is pretty amazing, from a plant's perspective that is. As a flo...
11/14/2016

The firecracker flower, or Crossandra infundibuliformis, is pretty amazing, from a plant's perspective that is. As a flower, they boast a beautiful orange color, that after picked can last days on the stem on which they were produced. Native to India and Sri Lanka, these flowers are typically cultivated from seedlings, and used many times as house plants in these temperate regions because the plant requires a minimum temperature of 10 degrees Celsius, or about 50 degrees Fahrenheit. These plants are very unique in their method or reproduction. After the flowers of the plant are all dried up, the seed pod remains, but it doesn't just open and release the seeds normally. In the presence of high moisture or after a rainfall, these seed pods explode, creating a popping sound and sending seeds flying! This allows them to reproduce very efficiently, with the hope that each seed goes undisturbed and can germinate.
- Alexander Greff
Class of 2018
Applied Plant Biology

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