Georgia Law Review

Georgia Law Review Georgia Law Review is the flagship publication of the University of Georgia School of Law. Established in 1966, Georgia Law Review is the flagship publication of the University of Georgia School of Law.
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Staffed entirely by second- and third-year law students, the Law Review is Georgia Law’s only general subject-matter publication. Law Review publishes one volume–comprised of four quarterly issues–annually, and it has recently launched a Symposium issue. Dedicated to publishing quality and timely legal scholarship for over forty-five years, Georgia Law Review publishes the work of renowned law professors, judges, and legal practitioners in addition to selected notes written by Georgia Law Review members. Georgia Law Review’s mission addresses two principal goals. First, the Review provides the finest legal education and training. Law Review editors select, edit, and publish the works that appear within the pages of Georgia Law Review’s volumes. Through this process, Law Review editors develop and hone their research, writing, editorial, and leadership skills. More importantly, however, the Review strives to provide a forum for legal reform. In the inaugural issue of the Georgia Law Review, Dean Lindsey Cowen articulates the Review’s purpose “in seeking out the weak points in our law, in developing appropriate recommendations for change, and in advocating them persuasively in its pages.” The editors of Georgia Law Review continually seek to fulfill this mission in helping the Review serve as a platform of legal reform. Georgia Law Review is staffed by Georgia Law students and operates independently of the University of Georgia Law faculty or administration.

Operating as usual

Symposium is tomorrow! Symposium is virtual and free to community members and attorneys not seeking CLE credit, so we ho...
03/24/2021
Symposium | Georgia Law Review

Symposium is tomorrow! Symposium is virtual and free to community members and attorneys not seeking CLE credit, so we hope to see everyone there. Register here: https://www.georgialawreview.org/pages/163-symposium. Today we're spotlighting our keynote speaker, Leader Stacey Abrams! We are honored to have Leader Stacey Abrams as our keynote speaker. She is the New York Times bestselling author of "Our Time is Now" and "Lead from the Outside," an entrepreneur, and political leader. After serving as Minority Leader in the Georgia House of Representatives, Abrams became the 2018 Democratic nominee for governor of Georgia. Dedicated to civic engagement, she launched Fair Fight to ensure every American has a voice in our election system.

Established in 1966, Georgia Law Review is the flagship publication of the University of Georgia School of Law. Staffed entirely by secon...

Today, we're spotlighting Panel 3, "The Future of Voting Rights."  We are honored to have Congresswoman Nikema Williams ...
03/23/2021

Today, we're spotlighting Panel 3, "The Future of Voting Rights." We are honored to have Congresswoman Nikema Williams as an introductory speaker! Congresswoman Williams serves Georgia's 5th Congressional District. Earlier this month, Congresswoman Williams voted to support H.R.1, the “For the People Act.” The bill includes two amendments authored by Congresswoman Williams to assist people interfacing with HUD with voter registration information and making Election Day a federal holiday. Professor Douglas teaches at University of Kentucky College of Law. His scholarship focuses on state constitutions and judicial decision-making, and he is the author of “Vote for US: How to Take Back Our Elections and Change the Future of Voting.” Ms. Joyce Gist Lewis is a partner at Krevolin & Horst, LLC in Atlanta and successfully represented The New Georgia Project in seeking relief to protect mail in voting during the 2020 Election. She also appeared on behalf of the Democratic Party of Georgia in emergency election litigation. Professor Pildes teaches at NYU School of Law. He has written on the VRA and the role of SCOTUS in overseeing elections. He was also part of the Emmy-nominated NBC breaking-news team for coverage of the 2000 Bush v. Gore contest.

Today, we're spotlighting Panel 3, "The Future of Voting Rights." We are honored to have Congresswoman Nikema Williams as an introductory speaker! Congresswoman Williams serves Georgia's 5th Congressional District. Earlier this month, Congresswoman Williams voted to support H.R.1, the “For the People Act.” The bill includes two amendments authored by Congresswoman Williams to assist people interfacing with HUD with voter registration information and making Election Day a federal holiday. Professor Douglas teaches at University of Kentucky College of Law. His scholarship focuses on state constitutions and judicial decision-making, and he is the author of “Vote for US: How to Take Back Our Elections and Change the Future of Voting.” Ms. Joyce Gist Lewis is a partner at Krevolin & Horst, LLC in Atlanta and successfully represented The New Georgia Project in seeking relief to protect mail in voting during the 2020 Election. She also appeared on behalf of the Democratic Party of Georgia in emergency election litigation. Professor Pildes teaches at NYU School of Law. He has written on the VRA and the role of SCOTUS in overseeing elections. He was also part of the Emmy-nominated NBC breaking-news team for coverage of the 2000 Bush v. Gore contest.

Today, we're spotlighting our second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act." Register here: http:/...
03/22/2021

Today, we're spotlighting our second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act." Register here: http://ow.ly/mMTR50E4p0U. Panel 2 will be moderated by UGA's own Lori Ringhand. Professor Ringhand is Director of Dean Rusk International Law Center. Her scholarship focuses on election and constitutional law. Professor Codrington teaches at Brooklyn Law School. He is a fellow at the Brennan Center and is co-author of a forthcoming book, "The People’s Constitution: 200 Years, 27 Amendments, and the Promise of a More Perfect Union." Professor Muller teaches at University of Iowa College of Law. His scholarship focuses on federalism and the role of states in the administration of federal elections. Professor Schultz teaches at both Hamline University and University of Minnesota Law School as a visiting professor. He has authored over 35 books and 200 articles, including his recent books "Encyclopedia of Money in American Politics" and "Presidential Swing States." Sachin Varghese is a partner at Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore and serves at General Counsel to Democratic Party of Georgia. He also served as a Georgia elector in the 2020 presidential election. In his practice, he represents plaintiffs in complex litigation matters.

Today, we're spotlighting our second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act." Register here: http://ow.ly/mMTR50E4p0U. Panel 2 will be moderated by UGA's own Lori Ringhand. Professor Ringhand is Director of Dean Rusk International Law Center. Her scholarship focuses on election and constitutional law. Professor Codrington teaches at Brooklyn Law School. He is a fellow at the Brennan Center and is co-author of a forthcoming book, "The People’s Constitution: 200 Years, 27 Amendments, and the Promise of a More Perfect Union." Professor Muller teaches at University of Iowa College of Law. His scholarship focuses on federalism and the role of states in the administration of federal elections. Professor Schultz teaches at both Hamline University and University of Minnesota Law School as a visiting professor. He has authored over 35 books and 200 articles, including his recent books "Encyclopedia of Money in American Politics" and "Presidential Swing States." Sachin Varghese is a partner at Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore and serves at General Counsel to Democratic Party of Georgia. He also served as a Georgia elector in the 2020 presidential election. In his practice, he represents plaintiffs in complex litigation matters.

Symposium is this Thursday! This week, we'll be spotlighting all of our speakers and panelists, starting with our first ...
03/21/2021

Symposium is this Thursday! This week, we'll be spotlighting all of our speakers and panelists, starting with our first panel, "The Right to Vote." Be sure to register here: https://www.georgialawreview.org/pages/163-symposium

Gilda Daniels is professor at University of Baltimore School of Law . She is an expert on voting rights and served in the DOJ during the Clinton and Bush administrations. She is also the author of UNCOUNTED: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.

Atiba Ellis is a professor at Marquette University Law School. His scholarship focuses on voting rights theory and critical legal theory. He has written about the impact of SCOTUS decisions such as Citizens United and Shelby County.

Professor Anthony M. Kreis teaches at Georgia State University College of Law. He has co-authored amicus briefs for Bostock v. Clayton County and Comcast v. National Association of African-American Owned Media. He has also testified before the Georgia General Assembly.

Bryan Sells is an Atlanta-based civil rights attorney. He has brought a successful VRA Section 2 suit challenging the method a Georgia county used to elect its local board of education. He has previously worked at the DOJ in the Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division.

Symposium is this Thursday! This week, we'll be spotlighting all of our speakers and panelists, starting with our first panel, "The Right to Vote." Be sure to register here: https://www.georgialawreview.org/pages/163-symposium

Gilda Daniels is professor at University of Baltimore School of Law . She is an expert on voting rights and served in the DOJ during the Clinton and Bush administrations. She is also the author of UNCOUNTED: The Crisis of Voter Suppression in America.

Atiba Ellis is a professor at Marquette University Law School. His scholarship focuses on voting rights theory and critical legal theory. He has written about the impact of SCOTUS decisions such as Citizens United and Shelby County.

Professor Anthony M. Kreis teaches at Georgia State University College of Law. He has co-authored amicus briefs for Bostock v. Clayton County and Comcast v. National Association of African-American Owned Media. He has also testified before the Georgia General Assembly.

Bryan Sells is an Atlanta-based civil rights attorney. He has brought a successful VRA Section 2 suit challenging the method a Georgia county used to elect its local board of education. He has previously worked at the DOJ in the Voting Section of the Civil Rights Division.

Register for our Symposium, "150 Years of Voting in America," featuring Leader Stacey Abrams as our keynote speaker and ...
03/17/2021

Register for our Symposium, "150 Years of Voting in America," featuring Leader Stacey Abrams as our keynote speaker and Congresswoman Nikema Williams as an introductory speaker. Symposium is virtual and free for community members and attorneys not seeking CLE credit. http://ow.ly/GTpX50E0DtQ

Our Symposium's third panel, "The Future of Voting Rights," will discuss changes in election law and features  Profs. Jo...
03/15/2021

Our Symposium's third panel, "The Future of Voting Rights," will discuss changes in election law and features Profs. Joshua Douglas from University of Kentucky J. David Rosenberg College of Law and Richard Pildes from New York University School of Law Ms. Joyce Gist Lewis, partner at Krevolin & Horst, LLC. Congresswoman Nikema Williams will be serving as the panel's introductory speaker! Register here: http://ow.ly/MVol50DY8XM

Our Symposium's second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act," features Prof. Wilfred Codrington I...
03/14/2021

Our Symposium's second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act," features Prof. Wilfred Codrington III from Brooklyn Law School, Prof. Derek Muller from University of Iowa College of Law, Prof. David Schultz from Hamline University and Mr. Sachin Varghese, partner at Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore. Symposium is only 21 days away so be sure to register here: http://ow.ly/A5fR50DY8NJ

Our Symposium's second panel, "The Electoral College and the Electoral College Act," features Prof. Wilfred Codrington III from Brooklyn Law School, Prof. Derek Muller from University of Iowa College of Law, Prof. David Schultz from Hamline University and Mr. Sachin Varghese, partner at Bondurant, Mixson & Elmore. Symposium is only 21 days away so be sure to register here: http://ow.ly/A5fR50DY8NJ

Our Symposium's first panel, "The Right to Vote," will discuss the history of suffrage and the right to vote and feature...
03/11/2021

Our Symposium's first panel, "The Right to Vote," will discuss the history of suffrage and the right to vote and features Profs. Gilda Daniels, Atiba Ellis, and Anthony Kreis and attorney Bryan Sells. We hope to see you on March 25th! Register here: http://ow.ly/yfxG50DVGe8

Our Symposium's first panel, "The Right to Vote," will discuss the history of suffrage and the right to vote and features Profs. Gilda Daniels, Atiba Ellis, and Anthony Kreis and attorney Bryan Sells. We hope to see you on March 25th! Register here: http://ow.ly/yfxG50DVGe8

Join us for our Symposium “150 Years of Voting in America” on March 25th, featuring Stacey Abrams as our Keynote Speaker...
03/06/2021

Join us for our Symposium “150 Years of Voting in America” on March 25th, featuring Stacey Abrams as our Keynote Speaker and Nikema Williams as an Introductory Speaker! Register here: http://ow.ly/MtcY50DRVGE

Join us for our Symposium “150 Years of Voting in America” on March 25th, featuring Stacey Abrams as our Keynote Speaker and Nikema Williams as an Introductory Speaker! Register here: http://ow.ly/MtcY50DRVGE

Congratulations to the Volume 56 Executive Board and Managing Board! We're excited to see all that you accomplish!
02/18/2021

Congratulations to the Volume 56 Executive Board and Managing Board! We're excited to see all that you accomplish!

Congratulations to the Volume 56 Executive Board and Managing Board! We're excited to see all that you accomplish!

Congratulations to the Editorial Board members whose Notes were selected for publication! We're excited to read these No...
02/09/2021

Congratulations to the Editorial Board members whose Notes were selected for publication! We're excited to read these Notes in Volume 56!

Congratulations to the Editorial Board members whose Notes were selected for publication! We're excited to read these Notes in Volume 56!

Congratulations to our newest Editorial Board members! They’ve already contributed to Volume 55, and we can’t wait to se...
10/05/2020

Congratulations to our newest Editorial Board members! They’ve already contributed to Volume 55, and we can’t wait to see their achievements on Georgia Law Review!

*Reposting due to an incorrect name! Our apologies!

Congratulations to Georgia Law Review's 2020–2021 Editorial Board! We are excited for these new members and look forward...
07/02/2020

Congratulations to Georgia Law Review's 2020–2021 Editorial Board! We are excited for these new members and look forward to all the amazing work they will do.

Black lives matter
06/05/2020

Black lives matter

We are excited to announce the 2020-2021 Executive Board and Managing Board members for Volume 55 of Georgia Law Review....
02/10/2020

We are excited to announce the 2020-2021 Executive Board and Managing Board members for Volume 55 of Georgia Law Review. Congratulations to these fantastic students!

Congratulations to our Editorial Board members who were selected for publication. We look forward to publishing scholars...
01/30/2020

Congratulations to our Editorial Board members who were selected for publication. We look forward to publishing scholarship from Madison Conkel, Alex Edmonds, Tyler Gaines, Nicole Hammett, Caitlin Henderson, Laura Nelson, Anna O'Donnell, Caroline Parnass, Jason Sigalos, Michael Sloman, Hunter Smith, Emily Snow, Jon Tortorici, and Julia Weaver in Volume 55.

01/07/2020
Georgia Law Review

Today is the first day of Spring classes here at UGA School of Law. Welcome back, everyone! We hope everyone has had a great New Year. Be on the lookout for newly published articles and notes by some spectacular scholars and students! In the meantime, checkout our website that has a vast library of scholarly articles and notes. https://www.georgialawreview.org/

Established in 1966, Georgia Law Review is the flagship publication of the University of Georgia School of Law. Staffed entirely by secon...

Volume 53, Issue 4 is now available here at Georgia Law Review. This Issue is dedicated to our Vol. 53 Symposium about m...
11/04/2019
Vol. 53, Issue 4, 2019 | Published by Georgia Law Review

Volume 53, Issue 4 is now available here at Georgia Law Review. This Issue is dedicated to our Vol. 53 Symposium about multi-district litigation. Find pieces authored by judges, practitioners and scholars. Discover the world of multi-district litigation or read thoughts on how to continue to move this litigation forward in the future. #MDL https://www.georgialawreview.org/issue/1697

MDL Turns 50: A Look Back & the Way Forward; some perspectives from the Volume 53 Symposium.

Yesterday we held our 2019 Symposium "Criminal Justice Reform in Georgia." This event was the culmination of 6 months of...
10/25/2019

Yesterday we held our 2019 Symposium "Criminal Justice Reform in Georgia." This event was the culmination of 6 months of hard work, driven by our Executive Symposium Editors Jonathan Kaufman and Justin Van Orsdol, as well as our EIC Amy Elizabeth Shehan. Kudos on a job well done and thank you for sparking discussion on such an important topic.

We also want to extend a special thank you all our panelists for your time, the staff and faculty at the University of Georgia for your support, and all of our EB and MB members who dedicated their time to making this a great event.

Be on the lookout for our forthcoming Symposium issue, which will feature scholarship by many of our panelists. Their work will continue to promote a dialogue and move Georgia forward in reforming its criminal justice system.

We are less than a month away from our symposium, "Criminal Justice Reform in Georgia: A Reflection of Progress and Oppo...
09/26/2019

We are less than a month away from our symposium, "Criminal Justice Reform in Georgia: A Reflection of Progress and Opportunities for Change" taking place October 24th. Gov. Nathan Deal will be the keynote speaker and there will be panels focusing on probation, bail and juvenile justice. You will not want to miss out on this great conversation! Register at https://estore.uga.edu/C27063_ustores/web/classic/store_cat.jsp?STOREID=152&CATID=1261

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I am no lawyer and I am not college educated. I am just a citizen. I recently sat on the jury in a case involving death and self defense. I have discovered a flaw in the court system that swings the scales of justice in favor of the prosecution. As a result, we put a man away for life when in fact he is innocent and was only fighting for his on life at the time of the incident. The flaw is in the jury instructions. 1st, it reads in such a way that many uneducated people cannot comprehend. 2nd, it gives the jury choices as to what they can find someone guilty of, but at no point does it actually use innocent in the instructions. There is not a line in the choices that says you can simply find the defendant innocent; only guilty or not guilty. By doing this, you take the thought of innocence away from the juror and in some way compell the juror to find them guilty of something. This is wrong. Also. I find it unacceptable for the presiding judge to be involved in helping the prosecution write the indictment of the individual he is actually judging. This also happened on this case. So, what does Georgia Law Review say in regard to such an issue ?
Congrats MEAGAN BROWN for your appointment as the first Black Editor-in-Chief of the Michigan Law Review @ https://www.freep.com/story/news/local/michigan/2018/01/26/michigan-law-review-editor-chief-african-american/1069210001/ I was a Staff Editor on the Michigan Law Review 30 years ago (May-Aug. 1989)... literally from off the streets! I tested on the Law Review with no law experience, nobody that mentored me in the law... and at the time I wasn't even a law student yet. However, because I'm a Black Conservative Academic that champions Natural Law & Natural Rights I've been blacklisted for over 30 years. To this day, the University of Michigan libraries (including the law school whose law review I was an Editor of 30 years ago), refuse to even carry any of my 11 books which have been translated in over a dozen languages, published on 4-5 CONTINENTS! This is what I mean by Liberal Fascism Writ Large. Ms. Meagan Brown, what will your appointment do? What can it do to combat this existential academic treachery by Marxist & Alinsky Academics who reign supreme at the 95-100% percentile in American Miseducation Concentration Camps we euphemistically call Colleges and Universities in America....? Throughout the WORLD? Is this TRUE Intellectual Diversity or Slavish Sophism, Grotesque Groupthink? Here's my latest lecture essay review of John Birch Society CEO Art Thompson's lecture series, "Myths vs. Facts" @ http://www.elliswashingtonreport.com/2019/10/19/myths-vs-facts-part-19-spiritualism-influence-on-america/ Please share with others... especially our Youth who are miseducated with Spiritualism (Drug abuse) & the Occult, Socialism Slavery, Liberal Fascism, Evolution Atheism, Eugenics Racialism, Communist Democide, Liberal Fascism, Gestapo Globalism, Judicial Activism, and many, many other damnable Heresies of unredeemed Mankind. Veritas Pro Christos et Eclessia! (Harvard's original 1692 Motto: 'Truth for Christ and the Church') ~ Ellis Washington, J.D. University of Michigan (Class of 1986, MM; Michigan Law Review, 1989)
Why is Georgia prosecutors allowed to use the "party to a crime" statue to convict alleged accomplices based on facts not alleged in the indictment. Does alleged accomplices have the right to know the "nature and cause" of the allegations against them just as an individual defendant, to enable them an opportunity to prepare an adequate defense. How can alleged accomplices prepare an adequate defense without prior notification of how he supposedly participated in the crime. When an indictment alleges an alleged accomplice participated in one manner, it is unconstitutional to convict him for participating in an entirely different manner. Correct???