Georgia Statewide AHEC Network

Georgia Statewide AHEC Network Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Network Program for Georgia helps recruit,train and retain health care professionals for rural and underserved areas of the state.
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Operating as usual

Have you looked at our career resources?  Our flagship product is the Health Careers in Georgia manual. Comprehensive in...
09/16/2020
Health Careers in Georgia 2019-2021 | foothills

Have you looked at our career resources? Our flagship product is the Health Careers in Georgia manual. Comprehensive info on healthcare careers, education, salaries and so much more.
https://www.foothillsahec.org/health-careers-in-georgia-2019-2021

Foothills Area Health Education Center (AHEC) is pleased to present the 11th edition of Health Careers in Georgia. This publication is produced through the partnership of the Georgia Statewide AHEC Network consisting of six centers with support from the Georgia Department of Community Health and the...

So many medical students, so few clerkship sites
09/10/2020
So many medical students, so few clerkship sites

So many medical students, so few clerkship sites

Some schools have been struggling to find clerkship sites and preceptors, and COVID-19 has worsened their woes. We look at the problem and possible solutions.

Contact Tracing: Training New Workers and Connecting with Rural Residents - The Rural Monitor
09/09/2020
Contact Tracing: Training New Workers and Connecting with Rural Residents - The Rural Monitor

Contact Tracing: Training New Workers and Connecting with Rural Residents - The Rural Monitor

Contact tracing is an important step in preventing further spread of the coronavirus. Alaska’s AHEC program, a center for public health in Washington, and a national public health foundation share their training strategies while an IHS hospital in Arizona discusses its in-person contact tracing in...

During pandemic, Black families put trust in Black doctors
09/08/2020
During pandemic, Black families put trust in Black doctors

During pandemic, Black families put trust in Black doctors

Over generations, Dr. Janice Bacon has built trust in a community generally skeptical of the health care system and made her Black patients feel they have a safe place to go for medical care.

Special Libraries Association (SLA)
09/02/2020

Special Libraries Association (SLA)

Registration is now open for #SLA2020, a virtual interactive experience that puts you in control of your learning, networking, and professional growth! Join #infopros and #librarians to learn critical skills, share ideas and experiences, build new relationships, and grow your network. Register now! https://connect.sla.org/ac2020/registration1

#SLAdrivingforward #SLAers #lawlibrarians #medlibs #acadlibs #datalibs

Albany Area Primary Health Care, Inc.
08/19/2020

Albany Area Primary Health Care, Inc.

Albany Area Primary Health Care (AAPHC) is currently hiring for a Director of Nursing for our medical group in Southwest Georgia.

The Director of Nursing (DON) is the organization’s most senior nursing administrator who establishes standards for nursing practices and maintains accountability and responsibility for nursing services. As a member of the Executive Team, the DON supports and facilitates an interdisciplinary team approach to the delivery of patient care. The DON assures that patient care, clinical and staffing standards for nursing are consistent with professional standards and with the mission, vision and values of AAPHC.

Ready to join this wonderful organization that serves nine counties across Southwest Georgia? Apply today online at www.aaphc.org/http://aaphc.org/careers/current-openings.

#aaphc #sowega #southwestgeorgia #georgia #nowhiring #valuechcs

Rural Health Research Gateway
08/12/2020
Rural Health Research Gateway

Rural Health Research Gateway

From 2010 to 2019, 120 rural hospitals have closed in the U.S. The healthcare professional workforce composition changes considerably after a rural hospital closure. Many rural communities see a decrease in primary care physicians and an increase in advanced practice providers.

However, approximately one-fourth of those communities that lost a primary care provider also saw a decrease in number of advanced practice providers.

Read more about the healthcare workforce composition in this brief from the Rural Policy Research Institute (RUPRI): http://ow.ly/agNp50ATYL2

Foothills AHEC
08/10/2020

Foothills AHEC

Introducing this year’s 2020 Pathway to Med School (PTMS) Cohort! We enjoyed hosting this bright group of premed students for our 3-Day PTMS Workshop and wish them all the best in their future plans to attend medical school. We appreciate our partners, PCOM Georgia and Mercer University School of Medicine, for their help in organizing tours and mock interviews for the group whether in-person or virtually. We also want to give a shout out to the NGMC GME program physicians (Family Medicine, Internal Medicine, and General Surgery) for participating in tours, Q&A sessions, and the Physician Roundtable Dinner. Here’s to expanding the pipeline of primary care physicians in rural Georgia! Applications for the 2021 PTMS program will open in December.

Georgia Health News
08/05/2020
Georgia Health News

Georgia Health News

The cuts come at a time when more people are experiencing mental health problems, and hospitals are reporting more drug overdose cases in their ERs...

America’s Looming Primary-Care Crisis
07/31/2020
America’s Looming Primary-Care Crisis

America’s Looming Primary-Care Crisis

The pandemic could put thousands of doctors out of business. Saving them may require changing how the health-care system works.

"Since reopening we have had 156,175 cases and 2760 deaths. We have probably reached maximum capacity for testing and ar...
07/30/2020
Amber Schmidtke, PhD

"Since reopening we have had 156,175 cases and 2760 deaths. We have probably reached maximum capacity for testing and are nearing maximum capacity for critical care beds. I would argue these numbers tell us that the experiment of reopening after three weeks of shelter in place has had disastrous consequences. We do not have the ability to adequately track and monitor the pandemic anymore and we are straining our healthcare infrastructure to cope with the consequences of our case surge. We desperately need to limit transmission back to manageable levels. Instead, it feels very much like our state has given up on even trying. Our death rate is 33 per 100,000 residents. With the calculations I did in the 27Jul update, that’s equivalent to the death rate of Mexico, whose population is 128.9 million compared to Georgia’s 10.6 million. The deaths we are seeing in Georgia were preventable."

In today's update there is the usual summary of the situation in Georgia but also discussion of two research articles including one of the few studies we have about how COVID-19 spreads within a school after reopening and the long term impacts of COVID-19 in adults.

07/29/2020
www.aamc.org

https://www.aamc.org/system/files/2020-06/stratcomm-aamc-physician-workforce-projections-june-2020.pdf

Georgia Budget and Policy Institute
07/27/2020
Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

Georgia Budget and Policy Institute

The Southwest Georgia Regional Medical Center plans to close in October. This will be the 8th rural hospital closure in Georgia since 2011.

Association of American Medical Colleges
06/30/2020
Association of American Medical Colleges

Association of American Medical Colleges

We’re excited to announce Residency Explorer, a free resource for rising 4th year MD and DO medical students in the United States and international medical applicants, is now available! Residency Explorer allows applicants to research individual residency programs in 23 specialties, compare themselves to applicants who previously matched at those programs, and explore program characteristics across many areas of interest.

Residency Explorer is the only resource with original, source-verified data from the 9 national organizations involved in the transition to residency, including . #Match2021 http://ow.ly/LJNl50AbyO7

U.S. physician shortage growing
06/26/2020
U.S. physician shortage growing

U.S. physician shortage growing

A new AAMC study projects a shortfall of up to 139,000 physicians by 2033. Among the factors: older patients and retiring doctors.

Amber Schmidtke, PhD
06/22/2020

Amber Schmidtke, PhD

Good evening! This is the Georgia COVID-19 update for 19Jun2020.

SUMMARY: We had a big day for cases, after several big days this week. Data suggest that the reason why Georgia isn't a hot spot like all its neighboring states is because we aren't doing enough testing. We also don't have enough contact tracers (they are hiring!).

DEATHS: There were 31 deaths newly reported today bringing the statewide total to 2636. For Georgia, this is a low-medium day for us.

CASES: Today was another big day with 1097 new cases reported. That's the third highest day we've had since the pandemic began. Counties with significant 24 hour AND 14-day increases include Atkinson, Bulloch, Catoosa, Chattooga, Coffee, Emanuel, Glynn, Irwin, Jeff Davis, Jenkins, Stewart, Tattnall, Tift, and Troup counties. I'll map the counties of concern in tomorrow's update. New case reports are graphed with a 7-day moving average in the top middle graph. The new statewide total is 62,009. From the trendline, you can see that cases have been increasing since the beginning of the month and that we are back to where we were at our peak, based on new case reports. If we look at the hot spot map from the New York Times, Georgia remains conspicuously blank compared to its neighbors and as discussed yesterday this doesn't make a lot of sense: (1) viruses don't recognize geopolitical borders, (2) we were the first state in the region to reopen so we've had more opportunity for transmission than our neighbors. More on why this might be happening, below.

TESTING & CONTACT TRACING: A common question I've fielded recently is "isn't our case count rising because we're doing more testing?" And for a while, I would have agreed that it was possible. However, if we look at our tests reported each day (middle graph) we really aren't doing as much testing as we once were. Our testing rate is stable. It is also a lot less than neighboring states. A few days ago, I shared a resource (https://www.covidexitstrategy.org/) that has some great tools for state to state comparison and one of them is how well each state is doing at reaching the target for daily testing. If you look at the blue table (middle left) you'll see that Georgia is way behind its neighboring states. Some of you might recall that there is a discrepancy on the landing page of the Georgia DPH daily report where the PCR test results don't add up to the daily case count. Today, there's a difference of 6,331 test results. And previously, DPH has explained that's because the top set of data only include results reported through electronic submissions. If you click on the Lab Testing tab, the numbers DO add up to the case total because it includes all positive PCR results, regardless of how they were communicated to DPH. So it's possible that the COVID Exit Strategy resource is using the test data submitted only through electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) and that could impact the % toward testing target. HOWEVER, that's a problem that would likely impact neighboring states as well and is unlikely to be unique to Georgia. Compared to our neighbors, we likely aren't testing enough and as a result, we look blank on the hot spot map because we can't find what we aren't looking for. However, we can do all the testing in the world, but it won't get us any closer to the other side of this pandemic unless we also do adequate contact tracing. DPH put out a great video today that explains how contact tracing works and you can view that here: https://youtu.be/8LANQADjaEY. They also issued a press release encouraging people to answer contact tracing phone calls. I've included a helpful graphic that explains how contact tracing works in the bottom right. So how is Georgia doing at contact tracing? Using modeling tools provided by CDC, National Public Radio investigated how each state was doing toward CDC guidance on the contact tracing workforce required to adequately respond to the pandemic. Only 10 states and territories meed the estimated need (see graphic in upper left). South Carolina has enough reserve staff to make it work. If we dig deeper, Georgia currently has 1300 contact tracers compared to an estimated need of 2948 (or 44% of the workforce needed). This number was confirmed by a press release today from GA DPH (see references for link). An interesting piece of data came out in the press release (bottom left of the graphic), that was probably intended to reassure people but I think has the opposite effect if you put it into context: "To date, 16,590 cases have been interviewed and 40,082 contacts identified." Folks, we have 62,009 cases to date and cases are climbing. If 16,590 cases have been interviewed that means that the contact tracers have only been able to investigate 26.8% of the pandemic so far for Georgia. With 1300 contact tracers, that's an average workload of ~48 cases per person to date and each case can have dozens - hundreds of contacts that need to be tracked down.

To quote Brody from the movie Jaws, "we're going to need a bigger boat." A much bigger boat, in fact. So if you're ready to get over this pandemic then we need to be doing all that we can to recruit contact tracers to join the DPH effort. These are paid positions, can probably be done remotely, with a minimum requirement of a high school diploma. If you are in a position to do this critically important work, PLEASE visit the link at the bottom of this update. In the meantime, please answer the phone if your caller ID shows "GA COVID Team." Let's make these investigations as efficient as possible for the contact tracers.

REFERENCES:
A note: almost all of my data come directly from the GA DPH daily report. I am sure to reference everything else, so you can see them for yourself.
https://dph.georgia.gov/covid-19-daily-status-report
https://dph.georgia.gov/press-releases/2020-06-19/georgia-dph-asks-residents-answer-call-new-contact-tracing-video
https://www.covidexitstrategy.org/
https://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2020/06/18/879787448/as-states-reopen-do-they-have-the-workforce-they-need-to-stop-coronavirus-outbre

BECOME A CONTACT TRACER: https://www.governmentjobs.com/careers/georgiadph/jobs/2772139/georgia-contact-tracer-coronavirus-response

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MAILING LIST: http://eepurl.com/g7facv

Meaningful Ways to Celebrate Juneteenth This Year
06/18/2020
Meaningful Ways to Celebrate Juneteenth This Year

Meaningful Ways to Celebrate Juneteenth This Year

On June 19, 1865, enslaved African Americans in Galveston, Texas, were informed they were free, nearly two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation was signed. Read on for meaningful ways to celebrate the holiday.

National AHEC Organization
06/17/2020
National AHEC Organization

National AHEC Organization

“I advocate so much that we need to have more black and brown doctors because we know that we can provide the care that our community needs, we can save our community, literally.”

Diversity and inclusion are central to the AHEC mission, and we are inspired by stories such as this one about a physician doing some remarkable work in the area of diversity in healthcare.

Association of American Medical Colleges
06/17/2020

Association of American Medical Colleges

A first-generation college graduate and D-1 athlete from rural Montana, Bridger Rodoni defied odds becoming a medical student (University of Michigan Medical School). Read about Bridger’s journey via the Anatomy of An Applicant resource project: http://ow.ly/EGo650Aayo1

Explorehealthcareers.org
06/17/2020
Explorehealthcareers.org

Explorehealthcareers.org

Although states are starting to loosen stay at home restrictions, clinical hours may still be hard to come by. Learn about how some medical students are earning their hours amid the Pandemic: http://ow.ly/kkIz50A6utM

Amber Schmidtke, PhD
06/15/2020

Amber Schmidtke, PhD

Welcome to the Sunday Week in Review for the COVID-19 pandemic in Georgia.

CASES: In the upper left you'll see a graph of cumulative cases to date broken down by county type. I've marked the last four weeks with blue arrows. The number of new cases (by date of report) is as follows:
- 24 hours: 880
- 7 days: 5783
- 4 weeks: 19,980
The new statewide total is 57,681. So 34.6% of the cases were reported in the past month. In the bottom left, I've graphed the total number of cases (and deaths) per week. We had several high case count days this week, and we haven't seen a weekly total this high since 19Apr. This week we saw new hot spots emerge along the Georgia borders with Alabama, Tennessee and Florida.

HOSPITALIZATIONS: I've provided a map in the top middle that displays the hospitalization rate for each county. The statewide average is 16.6%, as a point of reference. As of the most recent status report from Georgia Emergency Management Agency (Friday, June 12), critical care beds are filled to 73% capacity. In previous color-coding from GEMA, this would be coded as yellow on a stoplight-inspired scale.

DEATHS: The number of new deaths (by date of report) is as follows:
- 24 hours: 5
- 7 days: 271
- 4 weeks: 850
The new statewide total is 2451. So 34.7% of the total deaths to date took place in the past month. In the bottom middle I've mapped the local case fatality rate for each county. The statewide average is 4.25%, as a point of reference.

In the bottom right table, we can see some demographic data on the deaths so far. There is a small male:female predominance when we look at all fatalities, but this disparity increases when we look at the distribution of age and sex for fatalities (graph in upper right). In this analysis, the male:female predominance is observed for all deaths between ages 30 - 79. The ages of 60 - 89 have the largest concentration of deaths, and especially between 70 - 89. An underlying condition was noted for 62.6% of deaths. In the middle right graph we can see how age and race are distributed among the deaths so far. African American / Black deaths outnumber white deaths in every age category except for 80+. This is concerning because African Americans make up only 32% of the Georgia population according to census data. This tells us that COVID-19 is disproportionately impacting this population. I'll provide some more information on race and county type tomorrow but thought today's graphic was already busy enough.

As much as our communities are feeling fatigue over this pandemic, it's important to remember that this pandemic isn't tired of us. A virus is concerned only with physics, chemistry and biology and how those things contribute to its survival. When people gather, the virus has new opportunities to spread to new hosts. When I was in graduate school, I went through training to work with radioactive materials for some of my experiments and a part of that training was a motto that helped me remember how to minimize my exposures: time, distance, shielding. The comparison between a radionuclide and a virus is not perfect, but the exposure risk mitigation is rather similar. To minimize your exposures in a given setting, you want to minimize the time of exposure, maximize the distance from the hazard source, and put up whatever barrier or shielding you can between you and the hazard. In the context of this pandemic the "shielding" can be a mask or another physical barrier like plexiglass. With respect to time and distance, even if you can space yourself 6 feet away from others in an office or room, the risk increases with time. Anyway, I use this motto to think through exposures as I prepare to do a task or errand in public and thought it might be helpful to you as well.

REFERENCES:
https://dph.georgia.gov/covid-19-daily-status-report
https://www.census.gov/
https://gema.georgia.gov/document/document/sitrep-612/download

Address

Augusta, GA
30912

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(706) 721-8331

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Register today to participate in the upcoming Diversity Healthcare Virtual Fair being held on April 24, 2019. The event is FREE to potential students interested in learning more about post graduate degrees in the healthcare field. Chat live with 35 colleges and universities all from the comfort of your laptop! Feel free to share and re-post. #diversity #healthcare #graduateschool #virtualevent https://www.careereco.com/Fair/EventDetails?fairId=20a5d72d-cb04-4c3b-8f97-a9b3011824c4