Alice Cook House

Alice Cook House Alice Cook House is AWESOME! We love living here! Alice Cook House is: 1 of 5 houses in the West Campus House System, Cornell's residential college initiative.
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Home to 450 undergraduates living in Cook Main, Boldt Tower, Boldt Hall, North Baker, Baker Tower, 122 McGraw, and 625 University. Home to The Language House, a language-learning residence in Boldt Hall for students practicing German, French, Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish. Led by House Professor André Dhondt, Edwin H. Morgens Professor of Ornithology. A vital intellectual community that includes 30 House Fellows, Cornell faculty and senior administrators who engage with residents through intellectual and social opportunities that enhance student-faculty-staff interaction within the House.

Mission: West Campus House System Mission: A community of students and faculty gathered in a spirit of inquiry and active citizenship. West Campus House System Program Goals: Develop a sense of belonging to one's House. Create safe, healthy, and welcoming communities. Build meaningful relationships between residents and faculty. Create opportunities for intellectual exploration that lead to a deeper understanding of one's discipline, exposure to a broad range of knowledge, and a desire to be a lifelong learner. Encourage student engagement in the House System and provide opportunities for the development of student leadership skills. Provide opportunities for students to engage as citizens in the broader community. Help students navigate the opportunities available to them at Cornell.

Operating as usual

Cornell Southeast Asia Program
11/24/2020

Cornell Southeast Asia Program

EVENT: Hands-on Gamelan

With Christopher J. Miller, director of the Cornell Gamelan Ensemble

Monday, November 23, 9:30-10:30pm

Come learn to play the bronze percussion instruments of the Javanese gamelan! An ensemble of gongs and metallophones, gamelan is Indonesia's best known traditional music. This workshop gives a taste of this majestic and entrancing tradition. Most instruments are simple to play, so you can get up and running right away! For more about gamelan at Cornell see this trailer (https://vimeo.com/452556705). If you want to join in, sign up here (https://forms.gle/Bfc3zzi5HPjTi6gp8). This event will be capped at 8 people to maintain physical distancing guidelines and will be on a first come first serve basis. Looking forward to seeing you there!

02/03/2020
David Dobrik

Kkkkoo

FIRST DATE GONE WRONG!! EMBARRASSING FALL!!

‘We deserve to not live around poison’: Alabama Resident Activists Speak Up Against Environmental Injustice
10/30/2019
‘We deserve to not live around poison’: Alabama Resident Activists Speak Up Against Environmental Injustice

‘We deserve to not live around poison’: Alabama Resident Activists Speak Up Against Environmental Injustice

Coal ash, although not hazardous waste, according to the EPA, contains arsenic, mercury and other toxins that can cause cancer and health problems. While the Trump Administration has suggested weakening the rules about coal ash disposal further, the status quo has already had a terrible cost for th

10/21/2019
The Cornell Daily Sun
10/17/2019
The Cornell Daily Sun

The Cornell Daily Sun

With prelim season upon us, it is important to understand and implement the best methods of studying. A Cornell professor explains the cognitive impact of minimal sleep and cramming.

Alice Cook House's cover photo
08/31/2019

Alice Cook House's cover photo

We are lucky to have talented artist Kadie Salfi as a Cook House Fellow! Please check out her latest exhibit!
08/25/2019
Ithaca Voice

We are lucky to have talented artist Kadie Salfi as a Cook House Fellow! Please check out her latest exhibit!

A solo exhibition by artist Kadie Salfi examining themes of family history and memory will be on view at Corners Gallery from Sep. 5 to Oct. 5.

An opening event will be held 5:30-7 p.m. on Sep. 13.

Welcome to all the new and returning Cook House residents from your Cook House staff!
08/21/2019

Welcome to all the new and returning Cook House residents from your Cook House staff!

Thanks for a great year Alice Cook House staff!
05/18/2019

Thanks for a great year Alice Cook House staff!

Please join GRF Emeka at Relay for Life at Barton Hall! It will be going on for next few hours. Proceeds benefit cancer ...
04/13/2019

Please join GRF Emeka at Relay for Life at Barton Hall! It will be going on for next few hours. Proceeds benefit cancer research.

Cook House hosted the Cornell Board of Trustees for dinner last night! Thanks to all the students who attended. It’s imp...
03/22/2019

Cook House hosted the Cornell Board of Trustees for dinner last night! Thanks to all the students who attended. It’s important for leadership to get a chance to hear from students and they enjoyed the evening!

West Campus House System Sevin Fellow John Noltner featured in Cornell Daily Sun
03/16/2019
Photographer John Noltner Aims to Promote Peace With Photo Series

West Campus House System Sevin Fellow John Noltner featured in Cornell Daily Sun

Award-winning photographer and peace activist John Noltner embarked on a 40,000 mile road trip in 2009 to photograph the U.S to promote dialogue, resolve conflict and catalyze social change, which …

What kind of world do you want to live in? Join us at 6pm tonight (3/14) to see Photographer John Noltner’s photo exhibi...
03/14/2019

What kind of world do you want to live in? Join us at 6pm tonight (3/14) to see Photographer John Noltner’s photo exhibit and hear the stories!

A quick turn on some big prints Cornell University

We will share these stories in an exhibit opening Thursday night in the Cook Commons.

#bigprints #fastturnaround #localstories #theworldiwanttolivein #apeaceofmymind @ Alice Cook House

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Address

709 University Avenue, Alice Cook House, Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
14853

General information

Professor Emerita Alice Hanson Cook died on February 7, 1998, just nine months short of her ninety-fifth birthday. Throughout her long and productive life, she dedicated herself to improving the lives of working women and men everywhere she went, not only at Cornell and across the United States, but around the world as well. In her autobiography, A Lifetime of Labor (New York: The Feminist Press at the City University of New York, 1998), Alice refers to her "patchwork career": student, social worker, YWCA secretary, labor educator, post WWII advisor in Germany on reconstituting German labor unions, wife, mother, single parent of two boys and temporary parent to numerous others, professor, university ombudsman, world acclaimed researcher, and to the very end, an activist. What a remarkable example she set for living life to its fullest! Labor education was Alice's first vocation, and dedication to the enlightenment of working adults continued to engage her energy and attention throughout her life. Upon graduation from Northwestern University where she had been a student activist, Alice wondered where she could find work, which would implement her social ideals. She found that spot in the YWCA Industrial Department, which provided education and support to blue collar women. A talented educator even in her twenties, she volunteered to teach in other pioneering workers' education movements of the time: Commonwealth College in Arkansas, Bryn Mawr Summer School in Pennsylvania, the Summer School for Workers in North Carolina. She applied her skills as an organizer and teacher while serving as Education Director for the Textile Workers Union and as Assistant to the President of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers Union Joint Board in Philadelphia. Professor Cook had pursued graduate studies in Germany prior to the rise of Hitler, with special emphasis on the trade union movement there. Post-war, the U.S. Army turned to Alice for the task of reestablishing democratic unions in Germany through programs of adult education. Drawing on her prior knowledge of trade unions both in Germany and the U.S., and her fluency in the German language, Alice performed her assignment with distinction. Moreover, she developed contacts that became lifelong friends and sources of data for her later career as a scholar engaged in research and publication. In 1952, Alice was recruited by ILR Extension to direct a foundation-funded project: Integrating of Unions and Community. The project brought Alice to Ithaca, where she remained for the rest of her life. M.P. Catherwood, then the Dean of the ILR School, recognized her brilliance, and persuaded her to teach Labor History and Union Administration courses in the resident degree program. Moving into a new career as a college professor, Alice contributed both to teaching and research, publishing such path breaking works as Union Democracy: Practice and Ideal, Labor's Role in Community Affairs; and after winning a Fulbright for a year's study in Japan, An Introduction to Japanese Trade Unions, plus dozens of articles. Her research was almost always ahead of its time, and often cited. As a teacher, Alice was both devoted and demanding. Her lectures were a pleasure to listen to, and easy to take notes from; each sentence was complete, it nested where it belonged in a paragraph, which in turn supported a section of her presentation. Not surprisingly, she graded student papers on both form and substance. Alice Cook's service to Cornell and other parts of the local community was legendary. On campus, she was co-founder of the Women's Studies Program and the Advisory Committee on the Status of Women. And she opened the once all-male Faculty Club lunch hour to women. Appointed by University President Dale Corson as Cornell's first Ombudsman, she received complaints from anybody in the community, and she helped resolve them with patience and diplomacy. The procedures for that office are essentially the same now, as they were when Alice instituted them in 1970. Nearly every women's group in the Ithaca area also benefited from Alice's wise counsel and generous support. Among them were the Ithaca branch of the American Association of University Women, the Professional Skills Roster, Displaced Homemakers, the Tompkins County Chapter of the National Organization for Women (NOW), and Planned Parenthood of Tompkins County. Alice Cook retired from Cornell in 1973, but retirement, for her, merely meant going on to other pursuits. Her first undertaking was a study for the Ford Foundation of working women around the world, a global enlargement of the courses she had often taught for ILR Extension during her tenure. An explosion of publications followed that study, and included, The Working Mother, among others. In this period, she filed three amicus curae briefs, two in Japan on gender and age discrimination, and one in Canada on gender discrimination, as well as writing or co-authoring numerous articles. In 1975, Alice and her collaborator received a German Marshall Fund grant to study women and trade unions around the world. Once again, she donned her seven-league boots, and the two-volume report which followed this exhaustive research, Women and Trade Unions in Eleven Industrialized Countries, made its appearance, along with Working Women in Japan: Discrimination, Resistance and Reform, and The Most Difficult Revolution: Women and Trade Unions, treasures all for anyone interested in comparative labor relations. In 1983, which coincided with Alice's own 80th year, ILR celebrated her birthday by hosting an international conference on "Women Workers in Fifteen Countries" featuring speakers from the countries in which Alice had conducted her research. And in the years following, Alice Cook dedicated herself and her still remarkable energies to the study of comparable worth, and wrote two casebooks on the subject. Her research played an important role in public policy formulation and was the subject of a number of ILR Extension Conferences in which she was the lead speaker. Following the pattern of her youth, she continued to participate in summer schools for women workers as a teacher and speaker. And she found a winter home at the University of Hawaii's Industrial Relations Center, where, working at her computer, she turned out numerous articles, and finally many chapters in her autobiography. Over the years, Alice Cook inspired and mentored thousands of students, trade unionists, and colleagues with her active mind, her interest in everything human, and her good and graceful spirit. She leaves a rich legacy for the next century.

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 20:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 20:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 20:00
Thursday 09:00 - 20:00
Friday 09:00 - 20:00
Saturday 11:00 - 16:00
Sunday 17:00 - 19:00

Telephone

(607) 255-9543

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Alice Cook House is: 1 of 5 houses in the West Campus House System, Cornell's residential college initiative. Home to 415 undergraduates living in Cook Main, Boldt Tower, Boldt Hall, North Baker, Baker Tower, and 625 University. Home to The Language House, a language-learning residence in Boldt Hall for students practicing German, French, Japanese, Mandarin, and Spanish. Led by House Professor Shorna Allred, Department of Natural Resources.

A vital intellectual community that includes 35 House Fellows, Cornell faculty and senior administrators who engage with residents through intellectual and social opportunities that enhance student-faculty-staff interaction within the House.

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