Cornell Feline Health Center

Cornell Feline Health Center The Cornell Feline Health Center is dedicated to improving the lives of cats worldwide through the dissemination of information to cat lovers and caregivers and the support of scientific investigation into feline health issues.

Operating as usual

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), heart disease in cats affects 1 out of every 10 cats wo...
02/28/2021

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA), heart disease in cats affects 1 out of every 10 cats worldwide. Heart disease is a condition in which an abnormality of the heart is present. Most feline heart disorders are acquired during the course of an animal’s life, but others are present at birth. Heart disease in cats can be either congenital or acquired.

Signs of heart disease in cats include:
- difficulty/rapid breathing,
- weakness,
- lethargy,
- exercise intolerance,
- and collapsing episodes.

Cats very rarely cough as a result of heart disease. The normal resting respiratory rate for cats is between 15 and 30 breaths per minute. Respiratory rates above 35 breaths per minute in either species should prompt consultation with a veterinarian. Follow this link to learn more about the proper care if you suspect heart disease in your cat https://hubs.ly/H0Hl8Fz0

February Heart Health month tips continued...Have you heard about our Camuti Consultation Service? Did you know that our...
02/26/2021

February Heart Health month tips continued...

Have you heard about our Camuti Consultation Service? Did you know that our own Dr. Bruce Kornreich, Director of the Cornell Feline Health Center is one of our specialists offering cardiology consults?

Yes, Bruce is a board certified veterinary cardiologist who has broad experience in clinical cardiology, basic science, and veterinary education. He has practiced both private and academic clinical medicine, has undertaken basic scientific research in the fields of cardiology and neuroscience, and has been recognized as an outstanding teacher of students ranging from elementary school children to veterinary students. Dr. Kornreich received both his DVM and PhD from Cornell, and has been a dedicated member of the Cornell Community since 1988.

The Camuti Consultation Service is a unique fee-based service that puts you in contact with one of our outstanding veterinary consultants, who will discuss your cat’s condition and/or care with you. Learn more here https://hubs.ly/H0Hk5mz0

February Heart Health month series continued....Although most feline heart disorders are diagnosed in middle-aged and el...
02/23/2021

February Heart Health month series continued....

Although most feline heart disorders are diagnosed in middle-aged and elderly cats, some kittens are born with them. Fortunately, these congenital cardiac conditions are relatively rare, occurring in only one or two percent of kittens. According to Marc Kraus, DVM, and former senior lecturer in the department of clinical sciences at Cornell University’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the most commonly diagnosed among these disorders are: ventricular septal defect (VSD), patent ductus arteriosus (PDA), and mitral valve dysplasia (MVD).

You can learn more about Congenital Heart Disorders here: https://hubs.ly/H0H54Vp0

February Heart Month series continued...In the article from our last post Dr. Bruce G. Kornreich mentioned that the most...
02/21/2021

February Heart Month series continued...

In the article from our last post Dr. Bruce G. Kornreich mentioned that the most common heart disease in cats is hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, or HCM. HCM is a primary heart muscle disease that causes thickening of (usually) the walls of the left ventricle and is considered to be ‘acquired’, as they are not present at birth.
The cause of feline HCM is unknown, but it has been shown to be more prevalent in some cat breeds, including the Maine Coon, Ragdoll, British Shorthair, Persian, and Sphinx.

If you would like to learn more about the clinical signs, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of this disease, check out our dedicated webpage https://hubs.ly/H0GTnXz0

02/21/2021
The Dodo

A sweet story from The Dodo that we just had to share.

Aggressive cat didn't have a chance at the shelter — then this woman brought him home 💙

Dr. Bruce G. Kornreich, Director of the Cornell Feline Health Center and a board certified veterinary cardiologist at th...
02/19/2021

Dr. Bruce G. Kornreich, Director of the Cornell Feline Health Center and a board certified veterinary cardiologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, shares some tips about how to spot heart disease in your pets.

Kornreich says:
“February is American Heart Month, and it is important that every dog and cat owner is empowered to recognize signs of heart disease in their companion animals.
Regular veterinary checkups are a key component in keeping your cat’s heart healthy. The best thing that owners can do is to make sure their cats have thorough medical checkups — at least once a year — during which the veterinarian pays close attention to the heart. While examination with a stethoscope cannot detect all feline heart diseases, it’s probably the most cost-effective approach to diagnosis in otherwise healthy cats."

Check out our website to for more tips from Dr. Kornreich: https://hubs.ly/H0GTgNn0

February is Heart Health Month and the heart is not only a vital organ but also the driving force of life itself. In ord...
02/17/2021

February is Heart Health Month and the heart is not only a vital organ but also the driving force of life itself. In order to keep your kitty's heart thriving, we will be posting heart health tips for the remainder of February.
Starting today, we are diving in to the topic of heartworm in cats. Among all of the various disorders that can endanger a cat’s physical well-being and perhaps threaten its life, few are more insidious than feline heartworm disease, a potentially life-threatening condition that occurs when a parasitic worm called Dirofilaria immitis gets into an animal’s system. And the only way in which this worm can enter your cat’s body is through a mosquito bite. The infection occurs when a mosquito pierces a cat’s skin and, in so doing, allows entry of heartworm larvae that it has picked up from another animal, most commonly an infected dog, into the victim’s bloodstream. To learn more about this dreaded disease and how to take preventive measures to protect your feline friend, follow our link: https://hubs.ly/H0GPWgv0

DID YOU KNOW?President Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) was known as an avid cat-lover. He had two cats while he was in the W...
02/15/2021

DID YOU KNOW?

President Abraham Lincoln (1861-1865) was known as an avid cat-lover. He had two cats while he was in the White House; Tabby and Dixie, and because of his affection for felines, he would also bring in strays. There are many reports from his contemporaries as well as his wife about the president's love of cats.

Abraham Lincoln was the first President to bring a cat into the White House! When son Tad asked to bring his cat Tabby, to the home, Lincoln Agreed. Later, on a visit to General Grant’s headquarters in the middle of winter, Lincoln found three half-frozen kittens there and took them back to the White House.

It is said that he regularly played with cats to relieve stress during his presidency—a favorite de-stressing technique of cat lovers, even today.

Founded on February 12th, 1974 by Fred Scott DVM, PhD, the Cornell Feline Health Center was the first center dedicated s...
02/12/2021

Founded on February 12th, 1974 by Fred Scott DVM, PhD, the Cornell Feline Health Center was the first center dedicated solely to the improvement of feline health and well-being.

Since its inception, the Center has contributed significantly to our understanding of a variety of health issues, including the diagnosis and prevention of infectious diseases, the mechanism of feline inflammatory bowel disease, the spread of respiratory disease in shelters, the treatment of a variety of feline cancers, and improved methods of maintaining the genetic diversity of endangered species.

Funded solely by the philanthropy of our donors, the Cornell Feline Health Center has a proud legacy of supporting basic and clinical research, disseminating vital information and providing support to veterinary health professionals and cat lovers, supporting the education of tomorrow’s top-notch veterinarians and researchers, and responding to emergent health issues that affect cats worldwide.

Weight loss is a common problem in cats with a variety of diseases, and managing this problem can be challenging. This i...
02/09/2021

Weight loss is a common problem in cats with a variety of diseases, and managing this problem can be challenging. This is especially true when cats lose their appetite, as the drugs that may be used to stimulate appetite are commonly given orally, and if a cat is not eating, such medications cannot be reliably administered by adding them to food. Cats that don’t eat are also predisposed to a number of other potentially serious health issues, so effective appetite stimulants have tremendous potential to improve the lives of cats with a variety of conditions that decrease their appetite.

Mirtazapine is a drug that was initially developed to control nausea but has been shown to be an effective appetite stimulant in cats. It has been used for quite some time by veterinarians trying to improve their patients’ appetites, but the issue of giving it to cats that won’t eat has been problematic. The FDA approved a transdermal formulation of mirtazapine for use as an appetite stimulant in cats. This formulation can be applied to the skin of a cat, and studies have shown that such application results in levels of mirtazapine in the blood stream that are safe and effective at increasing appetite in cats. The name of the product is Mirataz and it is produced by Kindred Bioscience Inc.

We recommend that you discuss this therapeutic option with your veterinarian if your cat is having problems leading to decreased appetite.

February is Responsible Pet Owners month. With the ownership of a pet comes a list of responsibilities you can't or shou...
02/06/2021

February is Responsible Pet Owners month. With the ownership of a pet comes a list of responsibilities you can't or shouldn't avoid. Just like kids, pets can get sick and it's important to ask yourself if you are ready to face the financial and emotional responsibilities which come along with it. Pet ownership is a commitment, for better or worse.
The Cornell Feline Health Center is dedicated to educating pet owners across the globe to make the best decision for their pets. On our website you can find resources on many different feline health topics which will help you navigate your responsibilities as a pet owner along the way: https://hubs.ly/H0G6pVr0

February is Pet Dental Health Month. Does your Cat suffer from bad breath? The three most common dental diseases in cats...
02/03/2021

February is Pet Dental Health Month. Does your Cat suffer from bad breath? The three most common dental diseases in cats are gingivitis, periodontitis, and tooth resorption, and the severity of each of these conditions can vary significantly. Check out some health tips that will help you keep your cat's teeth clean and may also ward off a number of other health problems. https://hubs.ly/H0FTYtz0

We are proud to have Dr. Paul Maza as part of our Camuti consultation team. He used his passion to help animals by found...
01/29/2021

We are proud to have Dr. Paul Maza as part of our Camuti consultation team. He used his passion to help animals by founding his non-profit group FARVets. FARVets (Feral, abandoned, rescued animals) is dedicated to implementing projects abroad to assist local animal welfare organizations with their missions of vaccination, increasing animal welfare awareness via pet education, treating medical conditions and addressing overpopulation by holding sterilization surgery clinics. Learn more about Paul and his amazing work of FARVets on our news page
https://hubs.ly/H0FGCL10

Yesterday, January 24th, was Change a Pet's Life Day. We would love to hear your story how you changed your kitty's life...
01/25/2021

Yesterday, January 24th, was Change a Pet's Life Day. We would love to hear your story how you changed your kitty's life or vice versa. Life can be tough for all of us but a helping hand (or paw) with a little bit of love can give you the courage to push through.

Have you ever wondered, if your cat had questions, what would they ask? Your cat might not be able to form words but a c...
01/22/2021

Have you ever wondered, if your cat had questions, what would they ask? Your cat might not be able to form words but a cat's body language and behavior can silently scream a question without you even knowing. In celebration of National Answer Your Cat’s Question Day, we will answer the first 10 questions you or your cat might have. Ask away and let us find the answer for you.

According to numerous psychologists, the warmth and touch from your loved ones can have a huge impact on your mental and...
01/20/2021

According to numerous psychologists, the warmth and touch from your loved ones can have a huge impact on your mental and physical health. This can also be true for your little kitty. Check out this blog post to learn the importance of petting your cat to reduce stress https://hubs.ly/H0F7YrH0

“We are, each of us, a product of our imperfect society. Yet each and every one of us—faculty, students, and staff—has a...
01/18/2021
President Pollack reflects on the legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr.

“We are, each of us, a product of our imperfect society. Yet each and every one of us—faculty, students, and staff—has a responsibility, individually and as a community, to hold fast to our Cornell ideals: to condemn that hate, as we strive to become better than we are.”

Cornell University contains seven undergraduate colleges plus the College of Veterinary Medicine, the Law School, the Samuel Curtis Johnson Graduate School of Management, the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York City and Doha, Qatar, and the 93 fields of study in the Graduate School.

Veterinary One Health Association at Cornell
01/16/2021

Veterinary One Health Association at Cornell

One Health embodies the collaboration of many professional disciplines across the human and animal health spectrum. For the past few days we have highlighted how different professionals are important to One Health! Featured today, veterinarians! Comment below other ways you think veterinarians and their techs and assistants contribute to One Health!
#cornellonehealthsymposium #onehealth #veterinarians #vetmed #cornell #cornellcvm #cornellvoha

In this latest article from Catster, learn more about "How to Prepare Your Kitten for the Vet." The earlier a problem is...
01/15/2021
How to Prepare Your Kitten for the Vet | Catster

In this latest article from Catster, learn more about "How to Prepare Your Kitten for the Vet." The earlier a problem is diagnosed, the earlier intervention can be implemented,” Dr. Kornreich says. “In most cases, there will be a better outcome.” https://hubs.ly/H0DLp190

Start your kitten on the right paw by keeping her healthy from the moment she comes home. Here's how to prepare your kitten for the vet.

Let's brighten up these gloomy winter days with some fun kitty pictures and let's celebrate National Dress Up Your Pet D...
01/14/2021

Let's brighten up these gloomy winter days with some fun kitty pictures and let's celebrate National Dress Up Your Pet Day! Give us your best shot and show it off in our comment section 🤗📸😻.

They say that music calms the savage beast, and while savage may not apply to your feline friend, it is true that going ...
01/12/2021

They say that music calms the savage beast, and while savage may not apply to your feline friend, it is true that going to the veterinarian can be a stressful experience for cats. In some cases, the stress of these trips can cause them to behave in a less-than-cooperative manner, and stress is not good for your cat’s health, or for yours or your veterinarian’s!

A recent study published in the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery looked at the effects of playing different types of music (classical and that produced specifically for cats!) for cats in a veterinary clinical setting to see if it might calm them down. Their behavior was subjectively assessed by behavioral scores, and their physiologic stress was measured by evaluating the ratios of two types of white blood cells in their blood (a previously validated measure of stress).

The results showed that the cat-specific music reduced stress as measured by behavioral scores, but that it had no effect on the white blood cell measure of physiologic stress.

While more work needs to be done to validate or refute these findings, this study suggests that the use of music produced specifically for cats (this is described in the manuscript) may be helpful in reducing stress in cats during visit to the veterinarian.

Visit the link below to see the manuscript..

https://hubs.ly/H0DHKYP0

With the ongoing pandemic, every sneeze and cough can put your mind in overdrive. Respiratory infections are common in c...
01/09/2021

With the ongoing pandemic, every sneeze and cough can put your mind in overdrive. Respiratory infections are common in cats, especially in high-density populations such as shelters, breeding catteries, and feral cat colonies. A variety of viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa cause these infections, which negatively impact feline health. In order for you to put your mind at ease have your Vet evaluate the health of your little fur baby. If you would like to learn more about the potential respiratory infections in cats follow this link to our website: https://hubs.ly/H0DyrTf0

Resolutions are a good way to start the New Year. A New Year's resolution could also benefit your kitty. A healthy weigh...
01/05/2021

Resolutions are a good way to start the New Year. A New Year's resolution could also benefit your kitty. A healthy weight and exercise can result in a longer, healthier life for your cat. Many questions arise when it comes to the correct diet for your little fur baby. Sometimes, what we think would be a great treat or the best food choice for them, could potentially hurt them in the long run.

In order to make the best decision for your cat we recommend a yearly wellness check up. Diet needs can change with the current health condition and age of your cat. If you are in doubt, work with your veterinarian or a licensed nutritionist. Also check out our web page on "Feeding your cat" https://hubs.ly/H0Djg1Y0

Feeling thankful for the guidance and support of our Advisory Council members over the years!
01/05/2021

Feeling thankful for the guidance and support of our Advisory Council members over the years!

Members of the Baker Institute Advisory Council advise and support the Directors of The Baker Institute and the Cornell Feline Health Center, our faculty, and staff, providing input, guidance, and assistance in addressing and implementing strategic plans and objectives. The Council provides expertise, insight, strategic thinking, innovative ideas, networking opportunities, trend analysis, encouragement, vision, support, community engagement opportunities and fiscal resources.

We are so fortunate to have this expertise and the contributions of time and talent of so many, including long-time council member and supporter of the Baker Institute Dr. Joanne Bicknese.
https://www.vet.cornell.edu/departments-centers-and-institutes/baker-institute/about-us/advisory-council/joanne-bicknese-baker-institute-advisory-council-member

Address


General information

Feline health studies are the cornerstone to providing better health care for cats. Veterinarians must have specific information so that they can make intelligent decisions on the best disease treatment and prevention regimes for cats. New vaccines and specific treatment protocols do not just appear-they require dedicated effort, often over several years. The Cornell Feline Health Center is committed to obtaining information about diseases and health management which will enable veterinarians to maintain healthy cats.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:30 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:30 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:30 - 17:00
Thursday 08:30 - 17:00
Friday 08:30 - 17:00

Telephone

(607) 253-3414

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Cornell Feline Health Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The University

Send a message to Cornell Feline Health Center:

Videos

Nearby universities

Comments

Has anyone had any luck with treatments for oral squamous cell carcinoma? My 12yr old kitty, Meme, was diagnosed last week. Her prognosis is not good. Not a candidate for surgery as is spread in her lower lip/jaw area. Vet put her on steroids & antibiotic. I added Reishi Mushroom/Milk Thistle & Vit. E. Someone suggested Piroxicam to me instead of steroids. Any info would be greatly appreciated.
Hello all-- Meet Lucy. She is a sweet, loving and playful stray that showed up on our doorstep after living wild in the neighborhood since March. Unfortunately, after a vet visit we discovered she is FIV + and we can't keep her with our two cats and risk infecting them. She is otherwise a healthy cat but needs a home where she will be kept indoors and be the only cat. Anybody out there know of a home for her?
I am in need of help for my two adult cats. They are both obese (20 lbs) and I have to get them down to a normal weight. The vet just says "give them 1/4 cup of dry chow" twice a day. Is there some site that will give diet recipes that I can make for them?
On May 26th Peanut went to Rainbow Bridge and be with his buddy Motzie. Strange it was not his asthma that took him it was cancer in his lymph node along his trachea.
Love your picture of Dr. Richards and the kitty! Such a kind man.
Prayer letter before you by a rescued Tom Cat from India , asking for help to stay alive. Dear Friends / Sir / Ma'am , My name is Rasogolla, a 14 months old Tom Cat. One year ago I was rescued by Miss Sanchari Sengupta & Her family in a stormy, rainy night. In 10th of June 2019, I underwent Faecalith surgery at Belgachhiya Pet Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, as I was unable to release faecal matters for about long drawn 2 (Two) months, in spite of repeated urge. Now after 3months of surgery, from the day of 11th September, 2019, the same thing occurred even after maintaining each & every steps that the Surgeon suggested to do & I now can't eat sufficient food. To avoid reccurence of fact, I want to get rid of it permanently under the kind control of NGO who can provide Experienced Vet Surgeons team for exact treatment rather than experiment. My kindhearted rescuer family went far away for my first time surgery by spending more than their financial capacities that's not possible again and again as my another rescued friends ( few stray dogs & Puppies / stray Cats & kittens / few injured Birds) depend on them for food, basic treatment & Lil bit of shelter inside & outside of their residencial zone, that my rescuer family is doing just out of affection for abandoned animals for more than 10 years, without even asking for a single penny from anyone else. I am suffering from a very rare case of Anatomical Disorder at the end of spinal area (Probably Constricted area of iliocecal region) that only can be curable under the kind control of Expert Vet. Surgeon team (with sufficient updated Isfrustructure that's hardly available at West Bengal) & it will cost huge to do entire treatment (surgery & after surgery care like saline & Injection for healing) that's hardly possible to afford by my rescuer family though they are trying to reduce my pain by giving medicines & herbal therapy. But it's a case of Surgery that's urgently needed. Some people & Kolkata's Vet Surgeon adviced to go to Bangalore. Some heartless Ppl are asking to throw me at jungle, Some are humiliating my family to see their unlimited anxiety for an animal. I pray before you to connect me along with my Guardian for such treatment with all the arrangements from your side through NGO & get us back to my rescuer family so that I can live happily with them for the rest of my life (i.e. hardly for 14 to 16 years according to a Cat's lifespan) IF I SURVIVE....... Please help. Eagerly waiting for your kind response & cooperation. Yours truely Rasogolla Sengupta (the rescued Tom Cat)
I just recently lost a 7-yr-old cat who seemed to come down very ill suddenly. When she was a kitten, she had a chronic problem with prolapsed rectum. She had an operation I believe is called a colopexy and did well for a few years. Her symptoms before she died were increased thirst, discolored urine, not eating on her own, and small dark feces. She quickly went downhill within 24 hrs. This happened during Hurricane Dorian and no vets were open. I tried amoxicillin but she responded just temporarily.
Greetings...I have a female cat with significant anal gland issues. Are there any resources I can read up on this and how to prevent these issues? Thank you
Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a devastating disease affecting a terrifying number of cats. A cat genetics company, Basepaws, is now raising awareness about HCM through a novel way of genetic risk detection which may aid in the early detection of HCM symptoms. They recently tested the very first cat positively for an HCM mutation -- the famous internet sensation Samson the Cat aka Catstradamus. Here is the full article: