Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University

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We strive to make art accessible and engaging for all.

Join us every other Wednesday at Noon for Student Art Breaks, a 30 minute art talk. Our Student Guides will discuss how ...
02/10/2021

Join us every other Wednesday at Noon for Student Art Breaks, a 30 minute art talk. Our Student Guides will discuss how objects at Stanford’s museums relate to their field of study.
RSVP on Eventbrite: https://bit.ly/3aNGmlg
Today, Kaylee Nok (Art Practice major), discusses the influence of two artists’ processes on her own work.

02/09/2021
A Conversation with Isaac Julien: Migration and Film

Artist Isaac Julien will be in conversation with Cantor Arts Center Curator Maggie Dethloff and Ruby City Contemporary Art Center Director Elyse A. Gonzales to give audiences a deeper understanding of his work and practice. Julien's seminal multi-channel work, Western Union Small Boats, is on view concurrently at the Cantor Arts Center as part of When Home Won't Let You Stay and at Ruby City Contemporary Art Center.

Today, we are proud to announce the establishment of the Asian American Art Initiative (AAAI), an interdisciplinary effo...
01/25/2021
Cantor Arts Center launches Asian American Art Initiative | Stanford News

Today, we are proud to announce the establishment of the Asian American Art Initiative (AAAI), an interdisciplinary effort to acquire, display, and research art related to Asian American and Asian diaspora artists and practices.

Read more in Stanford Report:

Among the first of its kind, Stanford’s newest hub of interdisciplinary scholarship transforms the museum’s collection and expands research opportunities.

Happy birthday to Ruth Asawa. Born January 24, 1926 in California, this American sculptor and Black Mountain College alu...
01/24/2021

Happy birthday to Ruth Asawa. Born January 24, 1926 in California, this American sculptor and Black Mountain College alumna would have been 95. She was best known for her looped-wire sculptures, informed by the influence of such teachers as Joseph Albers and Buckminster Fuller. “I found myself experimenting with wire,’’ she explained: “I was interested in the economy of a line, enclosing three-dimensional space.... I realized that I could make wire forms interlock, expand, and contract with a single strand, because a line can go anywhere.’’

Upon moving to San Francisco in 1949, Asawa contributed to the arts education of the Bay Area by expanding local programming, co-founding the Alvarado Arts Workshop in 1968 and campaigning for the opening of the first public arts high school in the city.

❗Stay tuned for a special announcement related to the works of Ruth Asawa.

[Ruth Asawa with Family Masks, 1991. © 2020 Estate of Ruth Asawa / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy The Estate of Ruth Asawa and David Zwirner.]

In celebration of #MLKDay weekend, we remember the wisdom imparted by the Martin Luther King Jr. during his second visit...
01/15/2021
Stanford celebrates Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with four-day festival | Stanford News

In celebration of #MLKDay weekend, we remember the wisdom imparted by the Martin Luther King Jr. during his second visit to Stanford in 1967. In that speech, he touched on many resonate issues of past and present—racism, poverty and violence versus nonviolent social activism—and noted that the poor “find themselves perishing on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity.”⁠

➡️ Enjoy the free four-day festival, courtesy of the university (link below). Or revisit our recording of January's #SecondSunday, and create MLK-inspired activist art: stanford.io/3suy2iy

Stanford will celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day this year with a free, four-day webinar and documentary film festival that will open on Friday evening, Jan. 15, and extend through Monday, Jan. 18, the federal holiday marking the birth of the civil rights leader. At the festival, the King Institu...

"But how do you take an entire museum — originally intended to be experienced in person — and put it online during a glo...
01/11/2021
Best of Mountain View: Real estate software transforms museum collection into a virtual gallery

"But how do you take an entire museum — originally intended to be experienced in person — and put it online during a global health crisis?" Cantor Arts Center is leveraging new tools to virtually deliver art experiences and galleries, including virtual tours of our extensive collection of Rodin sculptures.

Read more here:

How do you take an entire museum -- originally intended to be experienced in person -- and put it online during a global health crisis? The real estate industry had the answer.

"The night before I left Stanford to start the shelter-in-place with my family in Los Angeles, I was at the Cantor. I re...
01/04/2021

"The night before I left Stanford to start the shelter-in-place with my family in Los Angeles, I was at the Cantor. I remember being in the Rodin rotunda with my fellow student guides and classmates attending the First Friday event when we all received the email announcing the official cancellation of in-person classes. The next
morning, I drove back home, unsure when I’d return to campus. Although that was the last night I physically spent at the Cantor, I’ve been there mentally ever since."

Student guide and Cantor scholar Melissa Mae Santos, ’21, writes a student perspective essay on connecting with art and community in the time of coronavirus. Read the full story: stanford.io/3oHZxlW

Dear Friends,Our warmest wishes of health, peace and prosperity this coming year.We are filled with hope; though the Can...
12/31/2020

Dear Friends,

Our warmest wishes of health, peace and prosperity this coming year.

We are filled with hope; though the Cantor and Anderson Collection at Stanford University are not yet able to set a reopening date, per state and county guidelines, we are preparing for your in-person return with renewed excitement.

As we welcome January’s fresh start, we look to encounter art and artists with new eyes – if only from our homes. In that spirit, below are three works that, like 2021, we hope will bring you encouragement and new perspective:

1.) Kahlil Robert Irving renders examples of the news and digital media in ceramics, slowing them down. His pieces are included in Anderson’s Formed & Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics, which highlights sculpture that is grounded in a centuries-old tradition and speaks to contemporary issues and ideas.
2.) While we seek to better understand how to sustain our well-being during the global health crisis, Robert Bénard’s drawing of legs and feet depict the attention to detail that mid-18th century researchers applied to gaining knowledge of the human body.
3.) It can be a hard choice to leave home. Artist Mona Hatoum, a British Palestinian born in Lebanon, makes sense of dislocation by incorporating everyday found objects into pieces that evoke movement and travel while reminding viewers of the human lives involved therein. Her work Exodus II will be included in the planned exhibition When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art.

Acts of creativity remind us we are never alone in our experiences of joy and tribulation. We are so grateful you are part of our vibrant community of art and ideas. Together, we will forge new and inspiring pathways ahead.

Happy New Year,

Jason Linetzky
Director
Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Maude Brezinski
Interim Co-Director
Cantor Arts Center

Elizabeth K. Mitchell
Interim Co-Director
Cantor Arts Center

Throughout the history of American art, portrait paintings have been used as a means to many ends: to memorialize those ...
12/27/2020

Throughout the history of American art, portrait paintings have been used as a means to many ends: to memorialize those who have passed, to teach future generations about important historical figures, and to sanctify legacies.

But who decides who is worthy of a painting, and what constitutes worthiness in artistic representation? Aleesa Alexander, assistant curator of American art, reflects on the role of portraiture in signifying important and marginalized narratives in American history.

Read the essay: stanford.io/3qKOsSJ

Remember this?A museum throwback captured at the Rodin Sculpture Garden during wildfire season from September 2020 by @s...
12/25/2020

Remember this?

A museum throwback captured at the Rodin Sculpture Garden during wildfire season from September 2020 by @stopjoshgo.

There's no substitute to experiencing art in person, and we're eager to welcome you back to the museums.⁠⁠In the meantim...
12/22/2020

There's no substitute to experiencing art in person, and we're eager to welcome you back to the museums.⁠

In the meantime, please enjoy this Digital Holiday Gift Basket, with compliments from the Cantor and Anderson Collection at Stanford University: stanford.io/3dn8SLt

In awe of this architecture.A museum #throwback of the Atrium by @luigidicali.
12/18/2020

In awe of this architecture.

A museum #throwback of the Atrium by @luigidicali.

"What makes my Thinker think is that he thinks not only with his brain, with his knitted brow, his distended nostrils an...
12/16/2020

"What makes my Thinker think is that he thinks not only with his brain, with his knitted brow, his distended nostrils and compressed lips, but with every muscle of his arms, back, and legs, with his clenched fist and gripping toes." —Auguste Rodin⁠

The Cantor Arts Center proudly possesses one of the largest groups of bronze sculptures by Auguste Rodin (France, 1840–1917) in an American museum, numbering almost 200 objects of both monumental and intimate scale, now available for view online as a #VirtualTour: museum.stanford.edu/virtual-tours

Just as eager as you to renew in-person art experiences are members of the volunteer organizations that support,advocate...
12/11/2020

Just as eager as you to renew in-person art experiences are members of the volunteer organizations that support,
advocate for, and educate about the exhibitions and artwork you see and events you attend.

So we asked them: what have you missed most about the Stanford art museums?

Read the Q&A with Megan Fernandez (Visitor Services, Volunteer Program), Shana Nelson Middler (Membership Executive Council Chair), and Jeanne Heise (Docent Chair): stanford.io/3dn8SLt

Enjoy your sumptuous feasts, just like the one depicted here by Dutch painter Abraham van Beyeren's "Still Life with a C...
11/26/2020

Enjoy your sumptuous feasts, just like the one depicted here by Dutch painter Abraham van Beyeren's "Still Life with a Crab."

#HappyThanksgiving from the Cantor Arts family.

Feeling a little nostalgic for our Rodin Sculpture Garden.⁠⁠Until we can reunite with our precious collection in person ...
11/20/2020

Feeling a little nostalgic for our Rodin Sculpture Garden.⁠

Until we can reunite with our precious collection in person (and instead of in polaroid), please enjoy our #MuseumFromHome content: museum.stanford.edu/museums-home

📸: @thepolaroidjay

In anticipation of #ElectionDay2020, Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, Cantor’s Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator and the di...
11/03/2020
To instruct, entertain and persuade: political art at the Cantor | Stanford News

In anticipation of #ElectionDay2020, Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell, Cantor’s Burton and Deedee McMurtry Curator and the director of the Curatorial Fellowship Program, talks about the relationship between art and politics and previews opportunities at the museum to engage with art that addresses conflict, power and governance while prompting dialogue about artists’ enduring calls for social justice.

Stanford curator Elizabeth Kathleen Mitchell explains the history of art and politics in the context of current affairs.

EXHIBITION ANNOUNCEMENT | The Cantor Arts Center will be the exclusive West Coast venue and only site with free admissio...
11/02/2020
Cantor Arts Center to present When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art | Cantor Arts Center Press Releases

EXHIBITION ANNOUNCEMENT | The Cantor Arts Center will be the exclusive West Coast venue and only site with free admission for the traveling exhibition, “When Home Won’t Let You Stay: Migration through Contemporary Art,” scheduled to open February 5, 2021.

Organized by Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston (ICA) and curated by Maggie Dethloff, assistant curator of photography and new media at the Cantor, the multimedia show features 20 leading artists from more than a dozen countries and over 40 works made since 2000, in addition to regional-specific works not present at the show’s other venues. It includes Richard Mosse’s multi-screen video installation “Incoming,” Yinka Shonibare CBE, RA’s recently commissioned “The American Library” — along with an interactive component allowing visitors to contribute their own immigration stories — Reena Saini Kallat’s route-mapping “Woven Chronicle” (shown here) and fabric and stainless steel “Hub” sculptures by Do Ho Suh.

Major exhibition features more than 40 works exploring themes of immigration, displacement and home; rescheduled opening planned for February 5, 2021 Aligned with its mission to be a gathering place that advances dialogue on contemporary issues, the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford University will be....

“This death mask captures the visage of Leland Stanford Jr. on March 13, 1884, upon his passing at the Hotel Bristol in ...
10/30/2020

“This death mask captures the visage of Leland Stanford Jr. on March 13, 1884, upon his passing at the Hotel Bristol in Florence, Italy. Created just after the 15-year-old boy succumbed to typhoid fever while traveling with his parents on their second European trip, it nonetheless seems like a sleeping portrait of a beloved child. The softness of the lips and chalky whiteness of the plaster create an eerie youthfulness that affirms the very idea of the death mask as a memento of mortality. Because the cast of the face is a literal imprint of its model, it captures an uncanny degree of detail: delicate wrinkles around the eyes, individual hairs of the brows and lashes, even the slightest protrusion of a forehead vein. This realism is what makes the death mask so haunting, reminding us of the lasting presence of a boy whose life ended too soon.” —Meagan Wu, MA, Art History, ’19

Explore the truly haunting reimagining of the Stanford Family Collections on our #MelancholyMuseum page this #Halloween: bit.ly/melancholymuseum

10/11/2020
Hagia Sophia is a masterpiece of world architecture, having served many different functions throughout its 1,500 years o...
09/29/2020
Opinion | The Hagia Sophia Was a Cathedral, a Mosque and a Museum. It’s Converting Again.

Hagia Sophia is a masterpiece of world architecture, having served many different functions throughout its 1,500 years of history: built as the cathedral of Constantinople in 532-537, then converted into a mosque in 1453 by the Ottoman Turks, and then transformed into a museum in 1934 by the founder of the Turkish Republic.

On July 10, 2020, Turkey’s highest administrative court revoked the 1934 decree, leading to the reconversion of Hagia Sophia from a museum back to a mosque and mandated a switch of its jurisdiction to the Directorate of Religious Foundations.⁠

The Hagia Sophia Public Forum at the Cantor Arts Center at Stanford has invited a core group of scholars and a political commentator and journalist to lead the discussion about the future of this great monument. Free and open to the public — register today for this virtual forum:

➡️ Part 1 on Oct 9, 12-1:30pm PST⁠: stanford.io/2S7BApV
➡️ Part 2 on Oct 16, 12-1:30pm PST⁠: stanford.io/2ScIc6p

Changing the secular space back into a religious one is a risk for the World Heritage Site.

Say cheese.⁠Special projects coordinator Tammy sets up our Matterport camera to render gallery spaces into virtual ones....
09/25/2020

Say cheese.

Special projects coordinator Tammy sets up our Matterport camera to render gallery spaces into virtual ones. ⁠

Explore our newly launched #VirtualGalleryTour of our Rodin collection: museum.stanford.edu/virtual-tours

(📷: Brooks Manbeck)

SAVE THE DATE: Friday, October 30th at noon— Renaissance print scholar and museum director Susan Dackerman and Adler Pla...
09/23/2020

SAVE THE DATE: Friday, October 30th at noon— Renaissance print scholar and museum director Susan Dackerman and Adler Planetarium's Pedro Raposo will be discussing the workings of early modern scientific instruments and their depiction on paper for the Newberry.

Open to the public. More information: bit.ly/3hRAxVh

What's next for the Cantor? This month, we launched our first-ever virtual gallery tour — explore "The Medium is the Mes...
09/11/2020
The art of adapting: Theater groups prepare for season of uncertainty

What's next for the Cantor? This month, we launched our first-ever virtual gallery tour — explore "The Medium is the Message: Art since 1950" virtually and join us for another Second Sunday for another art-filled (indoor) weekend.

Take a peek at some highlights of the upcoming fall arts season on the Midpeninsula, many of which will take place in cyberspace.

Sepia in real life.An unfiltered photograph of the museum captured today by preparator Albert Lewis.
09/09/2020

Sepia in real life.

An unfiltered photograph of the museum captured today by preparator Albert Lewis.

Try this out! ➡️ This week we launched our first-ever virtual tour: this self-guided interactive takes you through an im...
09/02/2020

Try this out! ➡️ This week we launched our first-ever virtual tour: this self-guided interactive takes you through an immersive, 360-degree rendering of The Medium Is The Message: Art Since 1950, an exhibition curated by Aleesa Alexander that explores artists’ non-traditional use of materials for critical and expressive inquiry.

The ongoing exhibition includes works by Ruth Asawa, Titus Kaphar, Gwendolyn Knight, Alice Neel, Miriam Schapiro, Roger Shimomura and Zhou Tiehai, among others.

stanford.io/3gUmBcB

Hard-won, not done.To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the Cantor Arts Center was washed aglow i...
08/26/2020

Hard-won, not done.

To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, the Cantor Arts Center was washed aglow in purple and gold, the official colors of the suffrage movement, for one night on August 25th. Celebrate the centennial by exploring this historic milestone in a three-part Stanford News series: stanford.io/2FSIA70. (📸: Andrew Brodhead)

#WomensEqualityDay #ForwardIntoLight

During the last decade of his life, Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was never without his Minox 35EL camera.In 2014, the Cantor ...
08/19/2020

During the last decade of his life, Andy Warhol (1928–1987) was never without his Minox 35EL camera.

In 2014, the Cantor Arts Center acquired the Andy Warhol Photography Archive—a collection of 3,600 contact sheets and negatives representing the artist’s photographic practice from 1976 to 1987—from the Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. This body of work reveals an intimate landscape of celebrity elites and gay culture of the 1970s and ‘80s through portraits and candid photographs.

In celebration of #WorldPhotographyDay, explore the digital exhibition of this unparalleled collection at Stanford University: stanford.io/2YivZjT

Andy Warhol, “Detail from Contact Sheet [Photo shoot with Andy Warhol with shadow],” 1986. Gift of The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts. © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

Take heart! There's still outdoor art. 🌳 The Rodin Sculpture Garden at the Cantor made a top 10 list in California (via ...
08/18/2020
The top 10 most spectacular sculpture gardens in California

Take heart! There's still outdoor art. 🌳

The Rodin Sculpture Garden at the Cantor made a top 10 list in California (via Mercury News):

Museums may still be shuttered in the Golden State but you can enjoy art outdoors, too. Here are 10 top sculpture parks in Los Angeles and the Bay Area.

Address

328 Lomita Dr
Stanford, CA
94305-5060

Accessible by numerous public transportation agencies including Caltrain, Santa Clara Valley Transportation Agency, SamTrans, Bay Area Rapid Transit, Altamont Commuter Express, Dumbarton Express, and the East Bay Express. The Stanford Marguerite, a free weekday shuttle system, picks up and delivers passengers to and from nearby public transportation stations and university locations, including the Cantor Arts Center, Rodin Sculpture Garden, and Papua New Guinea Sculpture Garden. If you would like to know more about the Marguerite shuttle, please contact the Transportation Office at 650-723-9362 or visit the Transportation Office Web site at http://transportation.stanford.edu

General information

Photography is allowed in the Center as long as the images are for personal, non-commercial use and works shown are part of the Cantor Arts Center’s collection. Photography of special exhibitions and of works on loan is restricted. Consult with the Visitor Service volunteer upon arrival to learn where you can photograph. Tripods cannot be used inside, but flash is OK. No wedding photography is allowed. Photography guidelines are at http://museum.stanford.edu/visit/Photography_Policy.html The Cantor Arts Center respects the intellectual property rights of others, and we ask that you do the same. You can learn more at http://fairuse.stanford.edu/internet-resources/

Opening Hours

Wednesday 11:00 - 17:00
Thursday 11:00 - 20:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 11:00 - 17:00
Sunday 11:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(650) 723-4177

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Get a fresh perspective with 5,000 years of art

Serving the Stanford campus, the Bay Area community, and visitors from around the world, the Cantor Arts Center provides an outstanding cultural experience for visitors of all ages. Founded when the university opened in 1891, the historic museum was expanded and renamed in 1999 for lead donors Iris and B. Gerald Cantor. The Cantor’s collection spans 5,000 years and includes more than 38,000 works of art from around the globe. These include our renowned collection of Rodin bronze sculptures, which are displayed inside the museum as well as in our outdoor Rodin Sculpture Garden. With 24 galleries and more than 15 special exhibitions each year, the Cantor is an established resource for teaching and research on campus. Free admission, tours, lectures, and family activities make the Cantor one of the most visited university art museums in the country.


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Comments

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