Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Anderson Collection at Stanford University A museum of modern and contemporary American art on the campus of Stanford University. FREE ADMISSION
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Thank you @artnews for the great write up on Moo Anderson, without whom the museum would not exist today.Mary Margaret “...
03/18/2021

Thank you @artnews for the great write up on Moo Anderson, without whom the museum would not exist today.
Mary Margaret “Moo” Anderson, who together with her husband Harry “Hunk” Anderson cultivated a world-class collection of modern and contemporary American art, was a key figure in the Bay Area art scene. Moo played an integral role in the Andersons' donation of over 100 major works to Stanford University—including pieces by Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Helen Frankenthaler—and her philanthropic activities extended to local schools, hospitals, and the nonprofit St. Francis Center. Tap the link in bio to read more about Moo's far-reaching legacy.⁠
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link in bio.
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Image: Moo and Hunk Anderson at Stanford University's Anderson Collection.⁠
Credit: Harrison Truong/Courtesy Anderson Collection⁠
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#MooAnderson⁠
#HarryAnderson⁠
#StanfordUniversity @anderson.collection.stanford⁠
#artcollectors

Join us on Mar. 10, Noon PST for #ArtBreaks with #StanfordStudent Guides. 📌To RSVP, check the link in bio.⁠This week's s...
03/10/2021

Join us on Mar. 10, Noon PST for #ArtBreaks with #StanfordStudent Guides. 📌To RSVP, check the link in bio.⁠
This week's session “Layering Perspectives: The Mindset of Creativity, Innovation, and Meaning” will explore how technology, business, and innovation are fueled by the same things that drive artists to look at the world in fresh, invigorating ways.⁠
Hosted by @cantorarts and @anderson.collection.stanford and Anuhea Parker, Management Science and Engineering Major & Creative Writing, Poetry Minor ‘22.⁠
Check link in bio for upcoming dates.

Join us for an Art Break on Wednesday at 12pm to hear from student, Melissa Santos as she discusses Art & Civil Rights. ...
02/22/2021

Join us for an Art Break on Wednesday at 12pm to hear from student, Melissa Santos as she discusses Art & Civil Rights. Melissa will talk about how art, specifically portraiture, helps us grapple with the emotional complexity of societal issues during the Civil Tights era.

Wednesday at noon! Join Stanford Student Tour Guides for a 30 minute art break talk every other Wednesday. You’ll hear a...
02/08/2021

Wednesday at noon! Join Stanford Student Tour Guides for a 30 minute art break talk every other Wednesday. You’ll hear about how objects at Stanford’s museums relate to different disciplines that each student is studying.
This week, join Kaylee Nok as she discusses the influence of two artists’ processes on her own work as an Art Practice major. RSVP on Eventbrite (http://bit.ly/art_breaks) to receive the Zoom link.

Anderson Collection at Stanford University's cover photo
02/08/2021

Anderson Collection at Stanford University's cover photo

Happy birthday to Stanford alumnus and Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell. In 1962, Robert Motherwell and Helen Fr...
01/24/2021

Happy birthday to Stanford alumnus and Abstract Expressionist Robert Motherwell. In 1962, Robert Motherwell and Helen Frankenthaler spent the summer at the artists’ colony at Provincetown, Massachusetts, where the coastline inspired the “Beside the Sea” series of 64 paintings. In this series, the oil paint was splashed with full force against rag paper imitating the sea crashing on the shore in front of his studio. Italian Summer (featured here), made in 1963, is a part of the “Beside the Sea” painting series.⁠

Caption this. #berniememes
01/21/2021

Caption this. #berniememes

In celebration of #MLKDay weekend, we remember the wisdom imparted by the Martin Luther King Jr. “Let us realize that th...
01/15/2021
Stanford celebrates Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with four-day festival | Stanford News

In celebration of #MLKDay weekend, we remember the wisdom imparted by the Martin Luther King Jr. “Let us realize that the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice.”

Enjoy the free four-day festival, courtesy of the university (link below). Or revisit our recording of January's #SecondSunday, and create MLK-inspired activist art: stanford.io/3suy2iy

Stanford will celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day this year with a free, four-day webinar and documentary film festival that will open on Friday evening, Jan. 15, and extend through Monday, Jan. 18, the federal holiday marking the birth of the civil rights leader. At the festival, the King Institu...

Now available as a virtual tour! "Formed and Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics" breaks the mold, highlighting artist...
01/13/2021
Formed and Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics | Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Now available as a virtual tour! "Formed and Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics" breaks the mold, highlighting artists who are reshaping ceramics in concept and craftsmanship, featuring 11 works by Kathy Butterly, Kahlil Robert Irving, Simone Leigh, and Brie Ruais.

Explore the gallery space virtually:

Wisch Family Gallery March 13, 2020 - February 22, 2021 Ceramics have played a fundamental role in the lives of many for centuries, as objects rooted in ritual, utility, and decoration. The medium of clay and the variety of finishing processes allows for infinite, and at times, unexpected expressive...

On shaping clay and our nation's future.Earlier this year, one of the "Formed & Fired" exhibition artists, Kahlil Robert...
01/04/2021

On shaping clay and our nation's future.

Earlier this year, one of the "Formed & Fired" exhibition artists, Kahlil Robert Irving, provided insight into his process and how he’s thinking about the present. An excerpt from our Q&A with Irving can be previewed here: stanford.io/3di9Ybm

📸: Attilio D'Agostino

Our #NewYears resolutions. Wishing you all a happy, healthy, and hopeful 2021! Cheers from the Anderson Collection at St...
12/31/2020

Our #NewYears resolutions.

Wishing you all a happy, healthy, and hopeful 2021! Cheers from the Anderson Collection at Stanford University.

12/29/2020

2020 flew by.

If you're ever curious about the behind-the-scene work at the Anderson Collection, watch this timelapse installation of #HostileTerrain94.

Hostile Terrain 94 is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project. The installation is composed of more than 3000 hand-written toe tags, each representing a migrant who has died trying to cross the US-Mexico border at the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019.

Learn more: stanford.io/3m0BRaE

Daydreaming about experiencing art in person again.A museum #throwback of the museum lobby from June 2018 by @itz.me.dai...
12/26/2020

Daydreaming about experiencing art in person again.

A museum #throwback of the museum lobby from June 2018 by @itz.me.daizy.

Our kind of holiday lights.A museum #throwback of Jim Campbell's "Home Movies Pause (David)" by Gary Head from February ...
12/20/2020

Our kind of holiday lights.

A museum #throwback of Jim Campbell's "Home Movies Pause (David)" by Gary Head from February 2020 via @artplus_siliconvalley.

Need a relaxing indoor activity? Cozy up with a museum coloring sheet. We have printable sheets featuring Anderson Colle...
12/17/2020

Need a relaxing indoor activity? Cozy up with a museum coloring sheet. We have printable sheets featuring Anderson Collection art on view: Richard Diebenkorn's "Girl on the Beach" and Elizabeth Murray's "Mouse Cup"! stanford.io/2WeXWZb

The "Formed & Fired: American Contemporary Ceramics" exhibition—which features 11 works by Kathy Butterly, Kahlil Robert...
12/14/2020
'Formed & Fired: Contemporary American Ceramics' at the Anderson Collection breaks the mold - Stanford Today

The "Formed & Fired: American Contemporary Ceramics" exhibition—which features 11 works by Kathy Butterly, Kahlil Robert Irving, Simone Leigh and Brie Ruais—was postponed from spring 2020 and will be on view upon the museum’s reopening, hopefully in early 2021.

Read more in Stanford Report: stanford.io/377OuMO

Exhibition highlights artists who are reshaping ceramics in concept and craftsmanship.

Black is still the new black. Sartorial museum goers, what do you think: a black wardrobe is a perennial favorite or are...
12/10/2020

Black is still the new black.

Sartorial museum goers, what do you think: a black wardrobe is a perennial favorite or are you all about color, color, color?

Gallery photo of Mark Rothko’s “Untitled (Black on Gray)” by @matthewrad.

Happy 100th birthday to Wayne Thiebaud! "Wayne Thiebaud is well known for his images of food, ranging from lollipops to ...
11/15/2020

Happy 100th birthday to Wayne Thiebaud!

"Wayne Thiebaud is well known for his images of food, ranging from lollipops to display cakes. During the early 1960s, he was identified with Pop Art—a connection he was quick to disclaim. Yet his own background in commercial art affect the way he handled subject matter. In 'Candy Counter,' he heightens the intensity of the color so that orange and green candies seem to vibrate with an improbable brightness, suggesting the chromatic enhancement common in advertising art. The bands of complimentary colors edging the class and candy create a flicker reminiscent of the fluorescent light in a cafeteria or candy store. Through his brushwork, Thiebaud conveys the tactile duality of his subject. He virtually frosts the surface of the canvas with paint to suggest the rippling of fudge or the shiny stickiness of caramel. Isolated in a cold, ambiguous environment, the various sweets become a means for formal exploration and finally works of art in themselves, displayed in a glass case."

The artist is pictured here at the Anderson Collection during his visit to deliver the inaugural Burt and Deedee McMurtry Lecture in 2015, where he shared his thoughts on his practice, teaching, and learning with our campus community. Celebrate Wayne Thiebaud's life and practice by rewatching the 2015 lecture: stanford.io/35qDYzs

Join us for part two of our exploration event with Eamon Ore-Giron this Thursday (11/12) at 6 PM! The artist will be pre...
11/10/2020
Part Two: Exploration event with Eamon Ore-Giron | Anderson Collection at Stanford University

Join us for part two of our exploration event with Eamon Ore-Giron this Thursday (11/12) at 6 PM! The artist will be presenting a film screening of "Chulas Fronteras," which explores the lives and music of Norteño musicians of the Texas-Mexican border. A Q&A will be hosted after the viewing to discuss themes relevant to Ore-Giron's practice as an artist and musician.

Christopher Brown’s “1946” captures a moment in post-war America. 1946 marks the end of World War II; a waving American ...
11/03/2020

Christopher Brown’s “1946” captures a moment in post-war America. 1946 marks the end of World War II; a waving American flag possibly signifies a victory, but what is more arresting is that the viewer can only see backs of people in the crowd. The painting was done in 1992, nearly half a century after the end of this great global conflict, which lessons have been fading over time as Americans look to the future rather than the distant past.

On #ElectionDay2020, we reflect on these themes of patriotism and civil duty, especially the importance of voting. GO VOTE AND AS ALWAYS, ENJOY ART.

[Mary Margaret ‘Moo’ Anderson speaks with technicians during the hanging of the collection in 2014. Photo by L.A. Cicero/Stanford News Service]

Reflections on a different kind of "Lucifer" this Halloween:"In a 1951 radio interview Pollock proclaimed: 'It seems to ...
10/30/2020

Reflections on a different kind of "Lucifer" this Halloween:

"In a 1951 radio interview Pollock proclaimed: 'It seems to me that the modern painter cannot express this age, the airplane, the atom bomb, the radio, in the old forms of the Renaissance or any other past culture. Each age finds its own technique.' Lucifer is among the earliest examples of Pollock’s own groundbreaking approach, which involved dripping, pouring, and splattering paint directly onto a canvas that had been tacked to the floor. The painting signals its modernity through Pollock’s choice of black enamel and aluminum paints, materials traditionally reserved for industrial use. A dense network of paint covers the entire surface of the canvas, creating an “all-over” composition. The bursts of yellow, red, orange, blue, and purple were squeezed directly from paint tubes. Pollock then propped the canvas on its side to add the final color, green; the resulting horizontal drips emphasize the painting’s panoramic dimensions.

Pollock gave Lucifer to Grant Mark, a chemist whom he began seeing in 1952 for his alcoholism, as payment for his services. Referring both to the morning star (which in Latin is called lux ferre, or light bringing) and the fallen angel by that name, the title Lucifer poignantly suggests an endless fall into the depths of the picture and the artist’s psyche."— Sidney Simon, PhD ‘18

(📸 of Jason Linetzky, director of the Anderson Collection, at right, watching the hanging of Jackson Pollock's painting Lucifer in 2014. Courtesy of L.A. Cicero/Stanford News Service)

Presented at the Anderson Collection, Hostile Terrain 94 is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the U...
10/28/2020

Presented at the Anderson Collection, Hostile Terrain 94 is a participatory art project sponsored and organized by the Undocumented Migration Project. The installation is composed of more than 3000 hand-written toe tags, each representing a migrant who has died trying to cross the US-Mexico border at the Sonoran Desert of Arizona between the mid-1990s and 2019.

Read more about the project in the student-written publication — available here: stanford.io/2TzWoXC

Next event: Join us on 11/5 for a panel discussion on Hostile Terrain 94. Details are available in the link above.

"In 'Timeless Clock,' [David] Smith welded together silver rods of varying lengths and widths onto broken axes that tran...
10/23/2020

"In 'Timeless Clock,' [David] Smith welded together silver rods of varying lengths and widths onto broken axes that transgress the rough perimeter of an open circle. The result is a complex arrangement of shard-like projections into space – like an exploded clock, perhaps, that can no longer tell time. Smith possessed a deep knowledge of the physical properties of his materials. His reasons for choosing silver, a relatively precious metal commonly associated with decoration, to make Timeless Clock are unknown, though Smith’s younger daughter, Candida, has said that her father 'loved the living glow' of silver." — Jennifer Field, PhD, Executive Director of the David Smith Estate

Learn more about David Smith and the sculpture on display at the Anderson Collection in our #LearningFromHome guide: stanford.io/2FYrV2u

REGISTER FOR THIS OCT. 22 EVENT: Stanford Presidential Visiting Artist Eamon Ore-Giron and poet and scholar Edgar Garcia...
10/15/2020
Artist Eamon Ore-Giron in conversation with poet and scholar Edgar Garcia | Anderson Collection at Stanford University

REGISTER FOR THIS OCT. 22 EVENT: Stanford Presidential Visiting Artist Eamon Ore-Giron and poet and scholar Edgar Garcia will discuss the artist’s practice through a lens of abstraction and in relation to the history and symbolism of gold. The color gold features prominently in Ore-Giron’s ongoing series of the “Infinite Regress” paintings, and the speakers will consider how we might decolonize and reevaluate this precious metal.

October 22, 2020 at 4:00pm   Stanford Presidential Visiting Artist Eamon Ore-Giron and poet and scholar Edgar Garcia will discuss the artist’s practice through a lens of abstraction and in relation to the history and symbolism of gold. The color gold features prominently in Ore-Giron’s ongoing ...

An eventful week at the Anderson: Join us for two virtual events on September 24-25. On September 24, we are hosting a f...
09/23/2020

An eventful week at the Anderson: Join us for two virtual events on September 24-25. On September 24, we are hosting a film screening of "Border South," a documentary following the Central American migrant experience across Mexico and into the Sonoran Desert. The film is presented in conjunction to our upcoming exhibition Hostile Terrain 94. Join us the next day (September 25) for a Q&A with the artist and filmmaker of "Border South" Raul Paz Pastrana and anthropologist Jason De León.⁠

EVENT INFO: stanford.io/3coIz79

Happy birthday to Elizabeth Murray (b. 1940). She belonged to a generation of artists who emerged in the 1970s and whose...
09/06/2020

Happy birthday to Elizabeth Murray (b. 1940). She belonged to a generation of artists who emerged in the 1970s and whose exposure to Cubist-derived Minimalism and Surrealist-influenced Pop inspired her to push painting beyond all historical models of making.

In this context, Murray produced a singularly innovative body of work. As she warped, twisted, and knotted her constructed three-dimensional canvases, she gave the elastic shapes of classic Surrealism a space in their own image. With a career that spanned over four decades, Murray was one of the most ambitious and revered artists of her time.

Celebrate her life and work by watching the 2019 Burt and Deedee McMurtry Lecture, featuring critic Roberta Smith and curator Jason Andrew on Elizabeth Murray. VIDEO: stanford.io/2FV9SIL

[Elizabeth Murray, Mouse Cup, 1981-1982. Oil on two canvases. © 2014 The Murray-Holman Family Trust / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.]

#LaborDay weekend is around the corner, but many of us won't be able to see our family and friends in person or travel a...
09/04/2020

#LaborDay weekend is around the corner, but many of us won't be able to see our family and friends in person or travel as previously planned.

In the days before the internet, exchanging letters was an art form to connect with loved ones and bridge the distance. From Philip Guston to Wayne Thiebaud, archival letters and postcards from artists in our Collection have inspired us to launch a letter writing campaign. For activity instructions: stanford.io/2QSjjMy.

Write, draw, and have fun. Share your letters with us! Tag your letters with @anderson.collection.stanford.

Save the date: On September 24th, the Anderson Collection is hosting a virtual film screening of “Border South” — exact ...
09/01/2020

Save the date: On September 24th, the Anderson Collection is hosting a virtual film screening of “Border South” — exact show time to be determined. Raul O. Paz Pastrana’s film captures some of the experiences that hundreds of thousands of migrants suffer in their quest to reach the United States.

It also references the Undocumented Migration Project, an effort to collect and catalog artifacts left behind by migrants in the Arizona desert. We are presenting this film screening in conjunction with the upcoming exhibition “Hostile Terrain 94" at the Anderson Collection.

More information: stanford.io/2ELToUe

Upcoming: last student takeover of August!I am Jensen Neff, class of 2020. I just graduated with a major in Product Desi...
08/21/2020

Upcoming: last student takeover of August!

I am Jensen Neff, class of 2020. I just graduated with a major in Product Design and a minor in Art History. I have been a student guide for two years, and the guide program was one of my favorite things during my time at Stanford. I absolutely loved it! I grew up in Northern California and spend my free time hiking, biking, and camping. My passion is thinking through a lense of inclusive design, whether that be in the space of museum education, consumer products, or sustainable fashion.

Join me as I take over over the Anderson Collection Instagram next week: instagram.com/anderson.collection.stanford/

Tune in next week as Laurel Foster takes over the #AndersonCollection Instagram. She is a Junior (Class of 2022), studyi...
08/07/2020

Tune in next week as Laurel Foster takes over the #AndersonCollection Instagram. She is a Junior (Class of 2022), studying Mechanical Engineering. When she's not spending her time as a student guide and docent at the Stanford art museums, she leads her sorority Alpha Phi as the director of philanthropy and is a member of the Sailing team at Stanford. Her interests include yoga and art. ➡️ instagram.com/anderson.collection.stanford/

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