Stanford Medicine

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Stanford Medicine researchers are screening diagnostic samples to identify known coronavirus variants circulating in the...
01/23/2021
Stanford Medicine launches large-scale surveillance of coronavirus variants in Bay Area

Stanford Medicine researchers are screening diagnostic samples to identify known coronavirus variants circulating in the Bay Area, including those from the United Kingdom, South Africa and Brazil.

Stanford Medicine researchers are screening diagnostic samples to identify known coronavirus variants circulating in the Bay Area, including those from the United Kingdom, South Africa and Brazil.

Scientists have discovered a simple method of reformulating gentamicin, a commonly used and highly effective antibiotic,...
01/15/2021
Purifying widely used antibiotic could reduce risk it poses to hearing, study finds

Scientists have discovered a simple method of reformulating gentamicin, a commonly used and highly effective antibiotic, that could reduce the risk it poses of causing deafness. (Photo taken before the COVID-19 pandemic.)

Scientists have discovered a simple method of reformulating gentamicin, a commonly used and highly effective antibiotic, that could reduce the risk it poses of causing deafness.

"There are so many little things we are coached on in the OR that never make it in the books," says Stanford surgeon Gra...
01/12/2021
Surgical sketches help Stanford surgeon practice, teach - Scope

"There are so many little things we are coached on in the OR that never make it in the books," says Stanford surgeon Graeme Rosenberg. "I've kept notes on these tips and tricks, but a bullet point never does it for me. I found that figuring out how to design an illustration helped me boil down the details into a learnable thing."

Graeme Rosenberg's illustrations, shared in classes he teaches and on social media, are resonating with fellow surgeons at Stanford and beyond.

Stanford Medicine expects to receive the first shipment of a coronavirus vaccine on Dec. 18 and start inoculating health...
12/16/2020
With guidance from faculty experts, Stanford Medicine prepares to deploy COVID-19 vaccine

Stanford Medicine expects to receive the first shipment of a coronavirus vaccine on Dec. 18 and start inoculating health care workers the next day.

The plan to vaccinate health care workers first aligns with federal recommendations shaped by two national committees whose members include Stanford Medicine faculty.

Stanford Medicine is ready to inoculate health care workers against COVID-19 with the first vaccine authorized for emergency use in the United States.

“I was happy to see that the study showed that the vaccine is effective, 95% effective, and it worked and was safe acros...
12/16/2020
Megan Mahoney, MD on Getting COVID-19 Vaccine | Stanford Medicine 15 December 2020

“I was happy to see that the study showed that the vaccine is effective, 95% effective, and it worked and was safe across all racial ethnic groups and all age groups.... And I decided to step up to be part of the collective to be vaccinated, to be a role model, and to be part of the solution.”
https://stan.md/3oOvetQ

How did Megan Mahoney, MD make the choice to get the COVID-19 vaccine? She shares her story of talking with her family, weighing the data, and stepping up as...

Based on brain wave data, researchers were able to identify two clinically relevant subtypes of common psychiatric disor...
12/11/2020
How brain-wave data can refine psychiatric treatment choices - Scope

Based on brain wave data, researchers were able to identify two clinically relevant subtypes of common psychiatric disorders.

Brain wave data identifies two psychiatric subtypes and can help point to best treatments for PTSD and depression, Stanford research shows.

12/10/2020
Stanford Medicine 2020: What we're made of

Thank you for being part of this remarkable community. Each day, your courage, resilience and empathy breathe life into Stanford Medicine's mission and make the impossible possible. We wish you health and peace this holiday season — and a bright New Year.

Eric Shaw began noticing strange dark patches on his skin in 2011, the year his older brother became Stanford's head foo...
12/07/2020
Stanford coach's quest to save his brother: 'God, I hope this works' - Scope

Eric Shaw began noticing strange dark patches on his skin in 2011, the year his older brother became Stanford's head football coach. Then, small tumors popped up all over his body. He was diagnosed with mycosis fungoides, a T cell lymphoma that affects fewer than four in a million people in the United States.

ESPN told the story of Stanford football coach David Shaw donating stem cells to save his brother, who had a rare form of lymphoma.

Stanley Rockson, professor of cardiovascular medicine, and his colleagues have uncovered a biomarker that confirms liped...
12/05/2020
Biomarker for lipedema, other lymphatic diseases discovered

Stanley Rockson, professor of cardiovascular medicine, and his colleagues have uncovered a biomarker that confirms lipedema is related to other lymphatic diseases, such as lymphedema, distinguishing it from obesity.

Researchers have identified a molecule that ties lipedema to other lymphatic diseases, such as lymphedema, and distinguishes it from obesity.

"We’re determined to reach as many people as we can," said Michael Snyder, professor and chair of genetics. "There’s no ...
12/04/2020
Smartwatch can detect early signs of illness

"We’re determined to reach as many people as we can," said Michael Snyder, professor and chair of genetics. "There’s no single solution that will turn the tide against COVID-19, but a device that could ping you when your health seems iffy would be a huge step in curbing transmission rates and easing the burden on our health care systems."

Stanford Medicine scientists have devised a smartwatch-based “alarm system” that goes off when it detects signs of infection.

About 53 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult with health or functional needs, said Charisse Lee of Stanfor...
12/03/2020
Message to family caregivers: There's help, even during COVID-19 - Scope

About 53 million Americans provide unpaid care to an adult with health or functional needs, said Charisse Lee of Stanford Health Care.

"Caregiving is isolating, and it can be very, very stressful," Lee said, but you don't have to do it on your own.

To help, Lee and Stanford's Amy Yotopoulos founded the Stanford Caregiver Center in 2019 to gather and distribute resources, and advice families about providing care for ill or vulnerable loved ones.

Experts from the Stanford Caregiver Center offer help for people doing the sometimes overwhelming work of caring for ill or vulnerable loved ones.

This #GivingTuesday, consider a gift to the Stanford Med Fund—helping students pursue their passion by supporting financ...
12/01/2020

This #GivingTuesday, consider a gift to the Stanford Med Fund—helping students pursue their passion by supporting financial aid, student wellness, the Medical Scientist Training Program and diversity initiatives. (Photo taken before the COVID-19 pandemic.) https://stan.md/3oePTHk

Stanford musicians reflect on the year and the people and things they're grateful for during the special Thanksgiving St...
11/27/2020
[email protected] Concert Highlights: Thanksgiving Special | Stanford Medicine 19 Nov 2020

Stanford musicians reflect on the year and the people and things they're grateful for during the special Thanksgiving [email protected] concert. #HappyThanksgiving #ThankfulThursday

Stanford Medicine [email protected] Virtual Concert is sponsored by the Medicine & the Muse Program and the Department of Medicine: https://arts.stanford.edu/event/...

A message to the Stanford Medicine community about COVID-19 safety.
11/25/2020
An Open Letter to Our Community

A message to the Stanford Medicine community about COVID-19 safety.

The number of COVID cases in the San Francisco Bay Area has soared over the past few weeks and we need your help.

Stanford Medicine community members remotely attended a weeklong series of talks, panels and workshops on reducing dispa...
11/23/2020
First Diversity Week at Stanford Medicine tackles tough topics in medical education, health care

Stanford Medicine community members remotely attended a weeklong series of talks, panels and workshops on reducing disparities and improving diversity in health care and medical education.

Stanford Medicine community members remotely attended a weeklong series of talks, panels and workshops on reducing disparities and improving diversity in health care and medical education.

As the holiday season draws near please remember to protect yourself, your family, and your community by wearing a mask....
11/20/2020

As the holiday season draws near please remember to protect yourself, your family, and your community by wearing a mask. Stanford Medicine stands with approximately 100 other U.S. hospitals and health systems urging people to #MaskUp. https://stan.md/333Wyfg

The new Stanford Hospital had been open a matter of months when the pandemic struck. "This state-of-the-art building was...
11/17/2020
How new hospital benefited patients, staff in pandemic year

The new Stanford Hospital had been open a matter of months when the pandemic struck. "This state-of-the-art building was designed to enable our exceptional staff to do their very best under worst-case scenarios: mass casualty, natural disaster or even a global pandemic," said Stanford Health Care's CEO David Entwistle. "We didn’t expect to be challenged so soon, but, because of this new facility, we were ready."

The 368-bed hospital building, which celebrates its one-year anniversary on Nov. 17, features technology and design features that have made handling COVID-19 cases easier.

Every fall, the Flu Crew provides free vaccines for Stanford students, staff and faculty, as well as people outside the ...
11/16/2020
Stanford Medicine students provide flu shots to help stave off ‘twindemic’

Every fall, the Flu Crew provides free vaccines for Stanford students, staff and faculty, as well as people outside the university community who lack access to health care. The vaccinations could help prevent hospitals from being inundated with flu patients if COVID-19 cases surge.

This fall, medical and physician assistant students vaccinated thousands of people against the flu. The vaccinations could help prevent hospitals from being inundated with flu patients if COVID-19 cases surge.

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is now calling on clinicians to screen for colon cancer when patients turn 45, i...
11/16/2020
Colon cancer screening age drops to 45 - Scope

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is now calling on clinicians to screen for colon cancer when patients turn 45, instead of 50. This applies to patients who have no symptoms or personal or family history of the disease. The national panel of medical experts hopes that by closing that five-year gap, many lives will be saved.

As younger adults are being diagnosed with colon cancer, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force is recommending screening all adults older than 45.

11/11/2020
Kaylene Carter, MD student and Navy veteran #WeAreStanfordMed

Stanford Medicine is proud of its veterans, including recent graduate Kaylene Carter. After graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy, Kaylene served as a surface warfare officer and was inspired to pursue a medical career. During a clinical rotation at the Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, she had the opportunity to care for fellow former service members. "Usually when a patient finds out I was in the military, too, they light up, feeling a little bit better about the person who's providing them care, realizing that we were in similar shoes and have been through similar experiences.” #VeteransDay

Stanford Medicine’s new Recover, Restore and Re-open framework is a tool to guide public officials, school administrator...
11/11/2020
Recover, Restore and Re-open: A Stanford Medicine framework for bouncing back from pandemic

Stanford Medicine’s new Recover, Restore and Re-open framework is a tool to guide public officials, school administrators and business leaders as they reestablish operations during different stages of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Stanford Medicine experts have created a framework to guide public officials, school administrators and business leaders on re-establishing normal operations during and after the COVID-19 pandemic.

"When we work as a team, we can affect big change. It doesn't require huge monetary investment, but it does require huma...
10/18/2020
Reducing surgical site infections in low-resource settings - Scope

"When we work as a team, we can affect big change. It doesn't require huge monetary investment, but it does require human buy-in to strengthen systems and make a difference."

Researchers discuss how a surgical safety checklist for low-resource settings helped reduce surgical site infections by an average of 35%.

During a stint in Ethiopia, Stanford surgical resident Jared Forrester worked on a surgical infection prevention plan for low- and middle-income countries.

Olympic swimmers race about 0.39 seconds faster in the evening than in the morning, and as insignificant as that fractio...
10/17/2020
Circadian rhythms affect Olympic swim performance, study finds - Scope

Olympic swimmers race about 0.39 seconds faster in the evening than in the morning, and as insignificant as that fraction of a second may seem, gold medals are routinely won by slimmer margins.

Stanford postdoc finds that Olympic athletes swim their fastest around 5 p.m. in the afternoon and their slowest in the morning.

How stress affects your brain and how to reverse it. Stanford neurobiologist Andrew Huberman discusses stress-taming tip...
10/16/2020
How stress affects your brain and how to reverse it - Scope

How stress affects your brain and how to reverse it.

Stanford neurobiologist Andrew Huberman discusses stress-taming tips with the "Future of Everything" host Russ Altman.

Stress in 2020 seems worse than ever. Stanford's Andrew Huberman discusses ways to reduce stress, such as different breathing patterns.

Join Dean Lloyd Minor and special guest Bill Gates on Oct. 21 at 11:30 a.m. PT for a conversation about COVID-19 and the...
10/16/2020

Join Dean Lloyd Minor and special guest Bill Gates on Oct. 21 at 11:30 a.m. PT for a conversation about COVID-19 and the future of global health. http://stan.md/gates #StanfordMedLIVE

Stanford Medicine immunologist Kari Nadeau discusses advances in food-allergy treatment and research, including a growin...
10/15/2020
5 Questions: Kari Nadeau on advances in food allergy prevention and treatment

Stanford Medicine immunologist Kari Nadeau discusses advances in food-allergy treatment and research, including a growing body of evidence that patients with several food allergies can be safely treated for all of them at once.

In a Q&A, immunologist Kari Nadeau discusses advances in food-allergy treatment and research, including a growing body of evidence that patients with several food allergies can be safely treated for all of them at once.

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