The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum

The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum celebrates the creative achievements of local and global cultures from antiquity through today.
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The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum unites the Textile Museum's collection and the Albert H. Small Washingtoniana collection.

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Brazilian artist Tonico Lemos Auad provides today’s #MondayMotivation through textiles of varying techniques. Auad uses ...
02/08/2021
Tonico Lemos Auad

Brazilian artist Tonico Lemos Auad provides today’s #MondayMotivation through textiles of varying techniques. Auad uses knitting, needle work and weaving to create tactile pieces that explore the significance of objects used in everyday life

https://www.stephenfriedman.com/artists/28-tonico-lemos-auad/

Tonico Lemos Auad explores physical manifestations of belief, specifically looking at the personal or cultural significance afforded objects in everyday life. Often encompassing notions of architecture and landscape, Auad’s unique way of working subverts traditional techniques associated with craf...

This is a curtain designed by William Morris, one of Britain's most influential designers of the 19th century. Morris wa...
02/05/2021

This is a curtain designed by William Morris, one of Britain's most influential designers of the 19th century. Morris was a multitalented artist who played a key role in the Arts and Crafts movement.

The movement disdained industrialization and idealized craftspeople taking pride in their own handiwork. When creating textiles, Morris preferred natural dyes and the techniques of tapestry weave or woodblock printing by hand. This woodblock-printed curtain employs various shades of only two colors: blue from indigo and yellow from weld. Morris's design aesthetic and color sensibilities were influenced by Persian and medieval European art #FabricFriday

Tulip and Willow furnishing textile fragment, designed by William Morris (1834-1896), England, c. 1883. Cotton, block printed, 44.5 x 35 in. The Textile Museum 1991.8.1. Gift of Nora Stone Smith

Learn more about this Chinese textile through our #StudentInsights:This Chinese “dragon robe,” tailored in the Manchuria...
02/03/2021

Learn more about this Chinese textile through our #StudentInsights:

This Chinese “dragon robe,” tailored in the Manchurian style, was made during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912) between 1875 and 1900. While robes patterned with dragons became widespread in Chinese court wear during the Ming Dynasty, it was under the Manchu emperors of the Qing dynasty that these robes became known as “dragon robes.”

This example features three large golden dragons centered around a terrestrial diagram, surrounded by symbolic motifs of bats, flaming pearls, cranes and flowers. There are a total of nine dragons, each with five claws. Nine and five were auspicious numbers with positive associations, and only high-ranking individuals were allowed to wear robes with nine five-clawed dragons.

Dragon robe, China, Manchu, 1875-1900. The Textile Museum 1973.30.2. Gift of Brigadier General Regan Fuller

Researched by Jules Kennedy. Jules Kennedy is a junior at the Maryland Institute College of Art currently working towards a bachelor’s of fine arts in illustration.

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "weft-faced plain weave."Weft-faced plain weave is a plain weave in which the weft yarns...
02/02/2021

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "weft-faced plain weave."

Weft-faced plain weave is a plain weave in which the weft yarns are significantly more numerous and hence more closely spaced than the warp yarns so that they completely hide the warp.

Today’s #MondayMotivation comes from Sonya Clark, who explores Black history and culture through textiles, mixed media a...
02/01/2021
Sonya Clark

Today’s #MondayMotivation comes from Sonya Clark, who explores Black history and culture through textiles, mixed media and performance

http://sonyaclark.com/

This is a formal winter hat worn by a sixth-rank civil official in Qing-dynasty, China. Winter hats featured fur or blac...
01/29/2021

This is a formal winter hat worn by a sixth-rank civil official in Qing-dynasty, China. Winter hats featured fur or black velvet trim, while summer hats were made of silk-covered bamboo.

Both styles included a fringe of red silk cords to cover the crown, as well as a “finial” (knob) that indicated the wearer's rank. The opaque white glass finial on the top of this winter hat identified the wearer as a sixth-rank official #FabricFriday

Hat worn by a sixth-rank civil official, China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912), 1900-1925. Velvet, large bead, metal decoration, silk cord; satin weave; 5.75 x 10.25 (dia) in. The Textile Museum 1993.3.2. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Ausey Robnett

Our librarian, Tracy Meserve, is bringing you her recommendations each month, starting with “100 Iconic Bollywood Costum...
01/28/2021

Our librarian, Tracy Meserve, is bringing you her recommendations each month, starting with “100 Iconic Bollywood Costumes” by Sujata Assomull.

"Indian costume is a popular research topic at the library, so when I first heard about this book I knew it was a must-have. It is fun and informative at the same time, and features 100 color illustrations of costumes from iconic Bollywood movies from the 1950s to today. The mix of traditional Indian costume elements, like saris, with Western fashion influences, such as the mini skirt, allow for a compelling look at how Indian culture has both changed and stayed the same over time." -Tracy Meserve #LibraryInsights

This week’s #StudentInsights focuses on a skirt from Southeast Asia:Tai Lue women of Northeast Thailand and Laos wear tu...
01/27/2021

This week’s #StudentInsights focuses on a skirt from Southeast Asia:

Tai Lue women of Northeast Thailand and Laos wear tube skirts called “phaa sin.” This intricately woven garment might be presented by a bride to her new family members as a gift. Doing so indicates that the bride is mature and capable of providing for her family. A woman might also wear a finely woven phaa sin like this one to a special event or ceremony.

The fabric of this phaa sin is untailored, comprising a length of woven yardage. Following Tai Lue tradition, the top and border sections are woven with dark-blue cotton yarns. The midsection features an assortment of gold brocading and geometric patterning. It also includes a striped sequence of green, magenta, teal and the same dark blue as the border, woven in double interlocked tapestry weave.

Tube skirt (phaa sin), Southeast Asia, Thailand, Tai Lue, c. 1930. The Textile Museum 1971.18.11. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. James Madison Andrews

Researched by Emma Barany and Grace Martin. Emma Barany and Grace Martin are currently juniors at the Maryland Institute College of Art, majoring in animation and fibers, respectively. They were drawn to the phaa sin because of its rich, beautiful colors.

Join us for a new season of Contemporary Voices this Tuesday (2/2) at 6pm EST with artist Anne Wilson. Presented in part...
01/27/2021

Join us for a new season of Contemporary Voices this Tuesday (2/2) at 6pm EST with artist Anne Wilson. Presented in partnership with Textile Society of America, the series shares a conversation with an innovative artist on the first Tuesday of the month through May.

Learn more and register: https://museum.gwu.edu/programs?field_tags_tid%5B%5D=8346

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "shuttle." A shuttle is a stick or other device on which the weft yarn is wound in order...
01/26/2021

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "shuttle."

A shuttle is a stick or other device on which the weft yarn is wound in order to make it easier to pass it through the shed during weaving.

Our monthly Fashion on Film program series returns this Thursday (1/28) at 6pm EST! Starting with “The Rise of the Mini ...
01/25/2021

Our monthly Fashion on Film program series returns this Thursday (1/28) at 6pm EST! Starting with “The Rise of the Mini Skirt: Nora Noh,” watch the film at home and then join us for discussion via Zoom (popcorn optional).

Learn more and register: https://museum.gwu.edu/programs?field_tags_tid%5B%5D=7741

Astird Krogh’s brilliant fiber optic sculptures provide some #MondayMotivation during these dark winter months. Inspired...
01/25/2021
Astrid Krogh

Astird Krogh’s brilliant fiber optic sculptures provide some #MondayMotivation during these dark winter months. Inspired by historical tapestries and carpets, Krogh incorporates new technology to create textiles of light

http://www.astridkrogh.com/#her-work/gallery/

An inspiring journey through the art and design of Astrid Krogh, a well-balanced mix of the personal and professional aspects of the artist, and always with her work in focus. Krogh’s impression on the world of art and design has been strong over the past several years, with the new presentation, ...

This is a textile fragment from Egypt. It was originally part of a larger textile, probably a wall hanging, woven in the...
01/22/2021

This is a textile fragment from Egypt. It was originally part of a larger textile, probably a wall hanging, woven in the 5th century.

The portrait appears to be of Dionysus, the Greco-Roman god of wine, fertility and theater. He is shown wearing a wreath of berries and vine leaves on his head and an animal skin over his shoulder – two features typically associated with Dionysus.

This textile was made using tapestry weave, which combines two structural principles: 1) Different colored weft yarns do not continue from selvedge to selvedge (side to side) of the cloth. Instead each one acts independently, passing back and forth within its own pattern area. 2) Since the weft yarns carry the pattern, the weave must be weft-faced (weft yarns cover the warp yarns).

Many tapestry weavers work 90 degrees to the design they want to create to capture minute details and create shading, as seen clearly in the facial details of this Dionysus portrait #FabricFriday

Textile fragment, Egypt, 5th century. Wool, linen; slit and dovetailed tapestry weave; 10.5 x 10.25 in. The Textile Museum. 71.132. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers in 1954

Join us in February for our new interview series with authors featured in the Fall 2020 The Textile Museum Journal (Vol....
01/21/2021

Join us in February for our new interview series with authors featured in the Fall 2020 The Textile Museum Journal (Vol. 47, COLOR). Guest editor, Mary Dusenbury, will lead four discussions at 12:00pm ET on February 10, 17, 24, and 26.

Learn more and register: https://museum.gwu.edu/programs?field_tags_tid%5B%5D=8356.

Our next #StudentInsights highlights a Navajo textile:This Navajo rug was produced in the Southwestern region of the Uni...
01/20/2021

Our next #StudentInsights highlights a Navajo textile:

This Navajo rug was produced in the Southwestern region of the United States in 1960. It was likely woven on an upright tapestry loom and made of Navajo-Churro sheep wool. The crisp linework and distinctive patterning of the repeating 3D diamond pattern is evidence of the exceptional quality of this handmade rug.

Along the top and bottom, the pattern appears more compressed, indicating that the tapestry was hand-beaten with more force in some areas. The cream and grey of the rug are undyed wool, while the black color of the weft could have been achieved by dyeing with black walnuts, and the red of the warp was likely dyed with cochineal or synthetic aniline dyes. This rug was likely made for a Western audience: Rug exports were one of the major sources of revenue for the Navajo people during the 20th century.

Rug, United States, Southwest, Navajo, 1960. The Textile Museum, 1986.18.9. Gift of Ione Brode

Researched by Gabby Hemmer and Lily Wilkins. Hemmer and Wilkins are both seniors in the Fibers department at the Maryland Institute College of Art. They share an interest in handwoven textiles, and both practice the craft themselves.

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "warp-faced plain weave."Warp-faced plain weave is a plain weave in which the warp yarns...
01/19/2021

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "warp-faced plain weave."

Warp-faced plain weave is a plain weave in which the warp yarns are significantly more numerous and spaced more closely than the weft yarns so that they completely hide the weft.

This is a woman’s shawl from the Azuay Province in the highlands of south-central Ecuador. It was woven in the 20th cent...
01/15/2021

This is a woman’s shawl from the Azuay Province in the highlands of south-central Ecuador. It was woven in the 20th century.

Shawls like this one are worn by women of mixed Andean and European heritage for special occasions, such as the foundation day of Azuay’s capital city, Cuenca. The traditional costume also includes a brightly colored skirt called a “pollera,” a white blouse and a Panama hat. Since cotton yarn is now more expensive than wool, most modern shawls are woven of wool yarn #FabricFriday

Shawl, Ecuador, 1986. Wool; warp-faced plain weave, warp-resist dyed, knotted fringe, machine embroidered; 103.5 x 31.25 in. The Textile Museum 1986.19.56. Latin American Research Fund

Today’s #StudentInsights features a textile from Uzbekistan:Known as a “munisak,” robes like one this were a staple of 1...
01/13/2021

Today’s #StudentInsights features a textile from Uzbekistan:

Known as a “munisak,” robes like one this were a staple of 19th-century Uzbek fashion. Creating a munisak started with women from urban families, who were in charge of raising silkworms and spinning their silk into thread. Threads were then handed over to workshops of male artisans. They would complete multiple rounds of dyeing (wrapping different parts of the pattern with string each time to resist dye), before finally weaving the threads into fabric on looms.

Before a wedding, the groom’s family would search for the finest silk ikat fabric their money could buy in order to tailor a munisak for the bride. The bride would wear it on her wedding day, and later it would be draped over her casket stand at her funeral, where a purifying ritual would allow her daughters to inherit the garment.

Robe (munisak), Central Asia, 1800-1850. The Textile Museum 2012.16.3. The Megalli Collection

Researched by Audrey Naiva. Audrey Naiva is a Fibers major at the Maryland Institute College of Art with a focus on natural dyes.

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "couching."Couching is a patterning process in which a yarn or object is attached to the...
01/12/2021

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "couching."

Couching is a patterning process in which a yarn or object is attached to the surface of a fabric with one or more stitches.

Check out the hand-stitched silk collages of Billie Zangewa for some #MondayMotivation. Based in Johannesburg, South Afr...
01/11/2021
Billie Zangewa - Artists - Lehmann Maupin

Check out the hand-stitched silk collages of Billie Zangewa for some #MondayMotivation. Based in Johannesburg, South Africa, Zangewa draws from cityscapes and domestic life to explore her intersectional identity

https://www.lehmannmaupin.com/artists/billie-zangewa/featured-works

Since its establishment more than two decades ago Lehmann Maupin has identified and cultivated the careers of an international roster of visionary and historically significant artists.

01/08/2021

Virtual Rug and Textile Appreciation Mornings are back for the new year! Sylvia Fraser-Lu kicks things off tomorrow (January 9, 11 AM) with an introduction to her new book on Burmese textiles. Visit our website to RSVP and see other upcoming programs, including a talk by Japanese-textile scholar Ann Marie Moeller https://museum.gwu.edu/rug-mornings

This is a headdress panel from what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was made by the Taabwa people in the...
01/08/2021

This is a headdress panel from what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. It was made by the Taabwa people in the 20th century.

Headdresses were worn by both male and female diviners. The white spiral motif at the center represents the rising moon and is referred to as "the eye of Kibawa,” a spirit who was believed to control the dead. During seances, spirits would rise from the earth and take control of the diviner. The motif was a message of enlightenment, courage and the dawning of hope #FabricFriday

Headdress, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 1920-1950. Beads, cotton; plain weave; 3.5 x 8.5 in. Cotsen Textile Traces Study Collection T-2925. Photo by Bruce M. White Photography

We’re sharing #StudentInsights on our collections from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), starting with this ...
01/06/2021

We’re sharing #StudentInsights on our collections from the Maryland Institute College of Art (MICA), starting with this handkerchief from India.

This textile is known as a “chamba rumal” or chamba kerchief, an embroidered handicraft that was popularized by the rulers of the Chamba kingdom, in the foothills of the Himalayas. These textiles were used as coverings for gifts and for ceremonies, and they continue to be used during weddings as exchanges of goodwill between families.

The embroidery is usually done by women, and this particular cloth uses several techniques, including satin stitch, split stitch, cross stitch and buttonhole stitch. Earlier pieces such as this were embroidered on unbleached yellow tinge fabric; today, embroiderers dye white fabric in a solution of boiled tea. Like many chamba rumals, this example depicts the Hindu deity Krishna. He is shown dancing along with his “gopis” (milkmaids) in a circular formation around a lotus flower.

Chamba rumal, India, Himachal Pradesh, Chamba, 19th century. The Textile Museum 1990.4.7. Gift of Leila F. Wilson.

Researched by Kirra Browne and Yesoll Yang. Kirra Browne is a senior at MICA working towards a BFA in ceramics. She is interested in the cultural significance of designs and patterns. Yesoll Yang is a sophomore at MICA working towards a BFA in graphic design. She is interested in the significance of colors and materials in textiles.

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "looping."Looping is a technique using a single element or yarn in which the free end an...
01/05/2021

Today's #TextileTuesday term is "looping."

Looping is a technique using a single element or yarn in which the free end and full length of the yarn is pulled through previous work at the edge of a fabric to form each new loop. The element crosses over itself in proceeding to make the next loop. Looping is an ancient technique that existed before the domestication of fiber sources and the invention of the loom. The technique is still practiced in areas with less European influence, such as the Amazon rainforest and New Guinea. Frequently, long plant fibers are used that can be twisted into yarn as the work proceeds.

The image shown here depicts crochet, a looped structure.

Wishing you a bright New Year with this kimono from Okinawa Island in Japan, one of the first countries to ring in 2021!...
01/01/2021

Wishing you a bright New Year with this kimono from Okinawa Island in Japan, one of the first countries to ring in 2021! We hope this year is as filled with endurance and beauty as this traditional bingata piece #FabricFriday

Eijun Shiroma, kimono, Okinawa Island, Japan, 2017. The Textile Museum 2017.8.1. Donated by Eijun Shiroma, 15th generation head of the Shiroma Bingata Studio

One of the silver linings of this past year is the way that our global museum community has come together online to disc...
12/29/2020

One of the silver linings of this past year is the way that our global museum community has come together online to discover, grow and connect over shared passions. With your support, we can continue to make our museum more relevant and accessible now and for the future.

Join as a member or make a gift to the Annual Fund today: https://museum.gwu.edu/join-give

Address

701 21st St NW
Washington D.C., DC
20052

Opening Hours

Monday 11:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 11:00 - 19:00
Thursday 11:00 - 19:00
Friday 11:00 - 17:00
Saturday 10:00 - 17:00
Sunday 13:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(202) 994-5200

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Located in the heart of Washington, D.C., the George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum celebrates the creative achievements of local and global cultures from antiquity through today. The museum unites The Textile Museum, established in 1925, and the Albert H. Small Center for National Capital Area Studies to engage the university and the wider community through collections, scholarship, exhibitions, and educational programs.


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