Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center

Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center The center's mission is to conduct research linking accessibility to health outcomes among individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing.
(5)

The center's mission is to conduct research linking accessibility to health outcomes among individuals who are deaf or hard of hearing. The center's goals are to: 1. design and evaluate existing outcomes and intervention projects 2. share results to the deaf/hh community and research community and 3. engage in community partnership, training and education. Our researchers at Deaf Health-QoL are involved in a wide range of biobehavioral and applied research projects. In addition, our faculty, students and community members - all from a variety of academic backgrounds - contribute to the Center.

05/13/2019
Fast Fact: Social Relationships

Are you statisifed with your social relationships? Want to find ways to create more a more social life?

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo at the top left corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Do you have friends you can count on, trust? Friends provide companionship and support, which increases your overall life satisfaction.

Our Deaf health lab surveyed 1397 Deaf ASL users. About 83% said that their social support was good.

Social health is an important part of your overall health, just like your physical and mental health. Think about how you feel about your social health. You might want to join sports, clubs, or community groups. Take good care of yourself and your friends!"

05/06/2019
Fast Fact: Mental Health Awareness

How well do you know your mental health? Watch this video to find out why it is important to be aware of your and others' mental health!

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo at the top right corner. A young white woman with brown hair is wearing a white lab coat.
"May is Mental Health Awareness Month! Do you understand the risk factors for mental health problems, how to help someone, and where to find help? Our Deaf Health Lab surveyed 1171 deaf ASL users and found that 20% of deaf adults experienced depression symptoms in the past 7 days. It is important that deaf adults are aware of their and others' mental health. Be open about your feelings and support others' feelings.

If you are a Gallaudet student and you experienced depression symptoms recently, you can go to Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS)."

04/30/2019
Fast Fact: Alcohol Awareness

Did you know that April is alcohol awareness month? Too much alcohol intake can cause some damage to your organs like liver, kidney, and your brain. Watch this video to learn more about the risks!

Transcript: A gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo on the top left. A South Asian male with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Did you know that April is Alcohol Awareness month? This Deaf Health lab asked 1,271 Deaf ASL users about alcohol use in the past 30 days. More than half (58%) said they drank alcohol within the past 30 days. In this group of drinkers, 9% said they drank more than once everyday in 7 days.

It is important to pay attention how much you drink. Too much alcohol intake can affect your health such as liver disease, heart problems, kidney disease, and more. It is important to drink safely!"

04/26/2019

Have you ever had a genetic test?

04/26/2019
Genetic Testing

This video asks about genetic testing. The question is "Have you ever had a genetic test?"

04/25/2019
ASL Film: Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer

Today is the National DNA Day. We are excited to share a new ASL film titled, "Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer!" This was proudly made by our research lab and the National Human Genome Research Institute/NIH.

Please click link to watch! Transcript is available on YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyFSp3VJQQ0

A National Human Genome Research Institute and Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center at Gallaudet University collaboration project on genetic ...

04/22/2019
Fast Fact: Suicide Prevention Awareness

We all can help prevent suicide; it is important to be aware of your resources.

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo at the top left corner. A white woman with blond hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"We can all help prevent suicide, and it’s important to know risk factors and signs. This Deaf Health lab gathered data from 1066 Deaf ASL users and found that around 25% (1 in 4) reported they do not have anyone they can talk with about their problems or difficult decisions.
If you or someone you know need support, you can go to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline online chat or VRS hotline and join us for the Out of Darkness walk at Gallaudet University on April 25 to raise awareness of suicide and provide support to the community. The link to register for the Out of Darkness walk is www.afsp.org/gallaudet

04/17/2019
Fast Fact: Satisfaction with VRI

Have you ever encountered problems while using VRI to communicate with healthcare speacialists or have you felt like VRI increases your accessiblity? Watch this video to find out what results of the collected data are!

Transcript: Transcript: A gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo on the top left. A South Asian male with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Have you ever gone to a health care service and communicated with the doctors through Video Remote Interpreting (VRI) technology? Did you have a satisfactory experience, or did you feel like you faced some obstacles with clear communication?

This Deaf Health lab gathered data from 555 Deaf ASL users who has experience with using VRI and only 41% were satisfied with the quality of the VRI technology service.

If the Deaf patient is not satisfied with the quality of VRI service, they often are less willing to disclose health information. There are some problems that a Deaf patient may face while using VRI technology such as limitations for interpreter in the VRI to see the doctor’s movement or gestures as the VRI technology service often faces the Deaf patient. Not only that, the VRI often may freeze or lose connection, leaving the Deaf patient without clear access to communication."

04/15/2019
Fast Fact: Taking Good Care of Your Health

Do you feel like you are able to take good care of your health? Watch this video and find how many Deaf ASL users are confident with their ability to take care of their health!

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo at the top left corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Do you wonder if you are taking care of your health properly? Do you visit the doctor regularly for checkups, exercise, and eat healthy food?
This Deaf Health Lab gathered data from 891 Deaf ASL users; around 72% felt confident in their ability to take good care of their health.

How can you maintain a healthy lifestyle? You can eat fruits and vegetables, reduce salt and sugar intake, drink fluids, exercise at least 30 minutes daily, and maintain a healthy body weight. That’s not all, be sure to visit the doctor for daily checkups when needed and pay attention to your body! A healthy lifestyle leads to a happier lifestyle!"

Dr. Zachary Featherstone and Tara Holcomb attended the University of Maryland Disability Summit. Dr. Zachary Featherston...
04/12/2019

Dr. Zachary Featherstone and Tara Holcomb attended the University of Maryland Disability Summit. Dr. Zachary Featherstone presented on 'Deaf Patients’ Accessibility, Experiences, and Perception of
Physicians’ Patient-Centered Communication Behaviors.' Tara Holcomb did her poster on"Deaf Patient Sees Doctors Less than Hearing Patients: A Case for Missed Mental Heath Diagnoses."

Photo Description: First picture includes a white male in a suit standing and is giving a presentation about patient-centered communication. The second picture includes a white female with patterned white and navy blue shirt. She is smiling and standing nearby her poster, "Deaf Patient Sees Doctors Less than Hearing Patients: A Case for Missed Mental Heath Diagnoses."

03/25/2019
Fast Fact: Healthy Eating

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo at the top right corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Sorry, I just finished eating my fruit!
Do you want to have a good quality of life? Eat fruits and vegetables. This can help reduce risks for heart disease, stroke, obesity, and diabetes!

The Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center asked how many Deaf adults ate fruits and vegetables. In this adult sample that uses ASL, 57% said that they did not eat enough vegetables. About 60% said that they did not eat enough fruits.

How much is enough? It is recommended that you eat 2 cups of fruits and 3 cups of vegetables.

What does one cup of fruit look like? (insert images)
What does one cup of vegetables look like? (insert images)

Have fun being creative with how you use fruits and vegetables in daily eating habits!"

03/11/2019
Fast Fact: Using Internet For Health Information

Transcript: A gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo on the top right. A South Asian male with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"When you have a health problem or are curious about a health topic, where do you go first for information? Internet? Vlogs? Books? Newspapers?

Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center gathered data on health information seeking trends from a sample of 1,150 Deaf ASL users. In this sample, around 80% used the Internet to look for health information within the past year.

Our website, Facebook, and Twitter has health information and videos available all in ASL and English too!"

Twitter Account: https://twitter.com/deafhealthlab
Website: http://www.deafhealthqol.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DHCQOL/

03/04/2019
Fast Fact: High Blood Pressure

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black logo at the bottom right corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

"Did you know that high blood pressure also affects the heart? High blood pressure, or hypertension, is when the pressure in the arteries is higher than the normal level. High blood pressure increases burden on the heart and blood vessels. It makes your heart work harder to pump blood through blood vessels all over your body. High blood pressure can increase the risk for heart attack and stroke.

The Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center gathered data from 1719 Deaf ASL users. About 31% of this sample were told that they had high blood pressure or hypertension by their doctor/healthcare professionals.

Go to the doctor regularly. They will take your blood pressure which allows the doctor to notice patterns and determine risk for hypertension. To have a healthy blood pressure, you should maintain a healthy weight, eat fruits and vegetables, exercise, and limit your alcohol and salt intake.

Take care of your heart. "

02/27/2019
Fast Fact: Know Your Family's Health History

Transcript: A gray background with a yellow, blue, and black Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center logo on the top right. A Black woman in a red shirt is signing in the middle.

"February is an important month as it is Black History month! This includes the importance of knowing your family's health history! Knowing your family’s medical history can help you identify if you have a higher than usual chance of having common diseases like diabetes, heart disease, and cancer. Knowing this information allows you to do reduce your risk of developing these diseases by prevention! How do you learn about your family medical history? By talking to your relatives and family members!
Our Deaf Health lab’s data shows that 17% of Black Deaf adults were unsure if their family members ever had cancer compared to 9% of Black Hearing adults.
80% of Black Deaf adults have friends and family that they feel comfortable talking to about health concerns whereas 87% Black Hearing adults had friends and family member they discussed their health with.
Ask about your family’s health because your health is everything."

02/25/2019
Fast Fact: Decision Making With Doctors

Transcript: A gray background with a yellow, blue, and black logo at the upper right corner. An African American male is wearing a white lab coat.

"Hey there, February is Black History month! Our Deaf Health and Quality of Life Center did a survey and found that black deaf individuals were likely to be less involved in making decisions with their doctors compared to hearing black individuals. What does shared decision making mean? It’s a process where medical professionals and patients work together to make decisions and decide on what tests, treatments, and care to pursue. It strengthens your relationship with your doctor and allows patients and providers agree on a treatment plan TOGETHER. Next time you go to the doctor, discuss your issues and concerns - your health is important!

02/15/2019
Fast Fact: Blood Clot

Are you wondering why heart attacks happen? Watch this video to find out! #AmericanHeartMonth

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black logo at the bottom right corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a white lab coat.

Hi! This month is Heart month!
*the girl clenches her chest*

Heart attack! Do you know why that happened? It is because of a blood clot which develops from unhealthy eating habits, or not exercising enough. Blood clots can also occur from factors that are unmodifiable like race and gender. Those who are most likely to develop blood clots are African-Americans females.

Clots begin when blood begins to slow down in vessels, causing build-up of clots. It will either break-off and block a narrower vessel down its path or stay fixed and eventually block the entire vessel. Then blood supply is cut off, causing heart attacks or strokes.
*the girl clenches her chest again*
You don’t want to be like me right? Eat right ! Exercise! Be careful!

Transcript: White document with a picture of a finger touching a touch-screen device on the side; with a video of a man ...
02/12/2019

Transcript:

White document with a picture of a finger touching a touch-screen device on the side; with a video of a man signing on the touch-screen. The flier reads:

Title: PROMIS-ASL, Health and Quality of Life Measurement in ASL

Subheading: Are you Deaf/HH? ASL Signer? 50 years old or older? If yes, take the survey and get a $25 gift card! For more information or to make an appointment, please email [email protected]

Footer: Principal Investigator and Director: Poorna Kushalnagar, Ph.D. The project has been approved by the institutional Review Board at Gallaudet University

02/11/2019
Fast Fact: Cervical Cancer

Blue background with a yellow logo “Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center”. A White person with brown hair is wearing a white lab coat.

Transcript:
“It is important to know your body, right? Did you know that cervical
cancer is easy to miss, thus resulting in cancerous growth ?!

Cervical cancer occurs when cells growth in the cervix grows out of control. You won’t likely feel the cancerous lesion, nor it is noticeable until it is too late. That is why you should
take pap smear tests to prevent development of cancerous lesions. Did you know that heath
insurance will cover for the tests? Go ahead!

CDC recommends that you start pap smear test at 18-21 years old, and retake it every three years.
This lab found that 78% (N=415) Deaf ASL users followed the recommendation of receiving pap smear screening test every three years.

The test consists of swabbing the cervix to gather cells, then the swabbed cells will be analyzed for possible cancerous cells.

It’s your health! Make sure you discuss about pap smear on your next doctor appointment!”

To view more health videos, visit our website at: Deafhealthqol.com/deaf-health-films.

02/08/2019
Fast Fact: Heart Disease

Transcript: Gray background with a yellow, blue, and black logo at the bottom right corner. A young South Asian girl with black hair is wearing a red shirt.

“February equals love right? YES! Love your heart! February is American Heart Month which focuses on heart disease.

I will explain how heart disease can occur. Your body needs blood that is flowing to survive, and arteries allow blood flow to your heart and body. When you have high cholesterol, plague forms on the walls of the arteries which can cause blood flow blockages. When this happens, this leads to heart disease. Stokes and heart attacks can happen due to heart disease.

Small changes can make a big difference. If you want a healthy heart, get a yearly physical with your general practitioner, listen to your body, get 20 minutes of exercise daily, eating healthy by adding fruits and veggies to your plate, maintain a healthy weight, lessen stress, and limiting alcohol and tobacco intake. Show your heart some love!”

Another paper was published in JADARA with Poorna Kushalnagar TraciAnn Hoglind, Abbi Simons, and Deb Guthmann-Ternus. Th...
01/11/2019

Another paper was published in JADARA with Poorna Kushalnagar TraciAnn Hoglind, Abbi Simons, and Deb Guthmann-Ternus. This article reports the prevalence of alcohol use in the Deaf community.

Address

800 Florida Ave NE
Washington, DC
20002

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The University

Send a message to Deaf Health Communication and Quality of Life Center:

Videos

Nearby universities