North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS

North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS NCICS is a North Carolina State University research institute located at NOAA's National Centers for Environmental Information in Asheville, NC. Our primary activity is operating the Asheville location of a NOAA Cooperative Institute.
(1)

Hosted by North Carolina State University, CICS-NC is an activity of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies (NCICS) and is a unique center of excellence showcasing a partnership between universities, the private sector, non-profit organizations, community groups, and the federal government. CICS-NC is a multidisciplinary team of experts who collaborate in climate and satellite research to support NOAA NCEI’s “research to operations” strategy. CICS-NC focuses on collaborative research into the use of satellite and in situ observations in climate research and applications and on preparing the next generation of the workforce needed to address climate change and applications. CICS-NC partners include all campuses of the UNC system and other members of the CICS consortium. CICS-NC is supported by an agreement between NOAA, NC State University, and the University of Maryland and is administered by NC State University.

Mission: Promote collaborative research into the use of in situ and remotely sensed observations in Earth system research and applications, led by NOAA’s National Centers for Environmental Information. Innovate new products and methods to understand the state and evolution of the full Earth system. Facilitate regional economic development through its engagement activities. Prepare the next generation of the workforce needed to address climate science and its applications. Engage with corporate leaders to develop climate-literate citizens and a climate-resilient society.

Our partners at the North Carolina State Climate Office are hiring! This is an exciting opportunity to engage in researc...
07/31/2020
Associate Director/Chief Scientist

Our partners at the North Carolina State Climate Office are hiring! This is an exciting opportunity to engage in research and help put #climate data into action. See the job posting below for details and instructions on applying: https://jobs.ncsu.edu/postings/134905

The Associate Director/Chief Scientist will report to the Director of the State Climate Office. This position will act as the research lead for the office and will serve as the Acting Director when the Director is unavailable. The Associate Director/Chief Scientist will be responsible for leading an...

NCICS's Jen Runkle led the development of a new NOAA resource that provides health researchers with information on envir...
07/29/2020
Environmental Data for Infectious Disease Research

NCICS's Jen Runkle led the development of a new NOAA resource that provides health researchers with information on environmental datasets they can use to study how COVID-19 and other infectious diseases might be affected by environmental factors such as temperature and humidity. Learn more via the story below:

NOAA provides a listing of resources to study the effects of environmental factors related to infectious diseases, such as COVID-19.

Jared Rennie is mentoring 2020 NOAA Hollings Scholar Mya Sears, who is developing a web-based climate and hurricane vuln...
07/17/2020
Vulnerability

Jared Rennie is mentoring 2020 NOAA Hollings Scholar Mya Sears, who is developing a web-based climate and hurricane vulnerability tool for Puerto Rico: https://pr-vulnerability-ncsu.hub.arcgis.com/

A collection of maps and data for Puerto Rico that contribute to the overall vulnerability of each municipality.

NCICS's Bjorn Brooks is one of the advisors for a NASA DEVELOP team studying year-to-year changes in forest cover to sup...
07/17/2020

NCICS's Bjorn Brooks is one of the advisors for a NASA DEVELOP team studying year-to-year changes in forest cover to support the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians.

The NCEI summer #NASADEVELOP team is hard at work investigating monitoring techniques to help manage the forests of the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians in western North Carolina. Read more about the impressive work this team is doing on this collaborative project. https://bit.ly/3h2lHLE

Mentoring is a key value here at NCICS, so we are pleased to be able to host several interns this summer and to continue...
07/17/2020

Mentoring is a key value here at NCICS, so we are pleased to be able to host several interns this summer and to continue our tradition of mentoring both NOAA Hollings Scholars and NASA DEVELOP interns. The experience is different this time around, with everyone participating remotely rather than in person, but we hope it will still be memorable and valuable for all involved. Learn more about the summer 2020 interns in this article from NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information:

NCEI has a full fleet of interns this summer working toward solutions to real-world issues. Learn more about the 17 early-career scientists and how they are contributing to NOAA’s mission. https://bit.ly/3j95M06

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
07/14/2020
NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

In a virtual gathering to discuss improving data availability and value, several scientists from NCEI and the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS will participate in the 2020 Earth Science Information Partners summer meeting that starts today. The theme of the conference focuses on building public-private partnerships to increase data resilience and enhance its socioeconomic value. Read more about the vision and virtual meeting of Earth Science Information Partners-ESIP.

New research led by NCICS scientists shows that atmospheric water vapor, not large-scale upward vertical velocity, is th...
07/09/2020
Quantifying the Relationship Between Extreme Precipitation and Atmospheric Water Vapor :: North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies

New research led by NCICS scientists shows that atmospheric water vapor, not large-scale upward vertical velocity, is the determining factor for precipitation totals in heavy precipitation events in the US. This has important consequences for #climate change resilience.

For the continental US, extreme precipitation generally scales linearly with precipitable water—the amount of water vapor in a column of air. But when precipitable water is already high, an increase in precipitable water can result in disproportionately large increases in precipitation totals.

There are regional and seasonal variations, so large-scale vertical velocity is important in some areas and seasons, but precipitable water, rather than vertical velocity, is the limiting factor on the maximum amount that falls during the most intense precipitation events.

As the #climate warms, atmospheric water vapor increases, but future increases in precipitation totals in the heaviest events may outpace the average rate of increase in water vapor.

Read more at https://bit.ly/2ZJZw64

Heavy precipitation events are the product of two important ingredients: a sufficiently large amount of water vapor in the atmosphere and the upward flow of air that generates precipitation. Quantifying how each of these factors contributes to extreme precipitation events is a crucial step in unders...

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
07/07/2020

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

The concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere continues to rise. From 1980 to 2019, the global yearly average has risen more than 20 percent, as shown in the latest graph from NOAA Earth System Research Laboratories. Carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas, causes heat to build in Earth’s atmosphere. The relationship between emissions and climate change is explained in a global effort to track sixteen “climate indicators” by the U.S. Global Change Research Program, supported by NCEI and North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS. Expand your knowledge: http://bit.ly/USGCRPClimateIndicators

Is #COVID-19 sensitive to weather conditions? Researchers from NCICS and @appstate have identified an association betwee...
06/23/2020
Humidity Identified as a Factor in COVID-19 Cases in Some U.S. Cities :: North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies

Is #COVID-19 sensitive to weather conditions? Researchers from NCICS and @appstate have identified an association between humidity and COVID-19 case counts in several U.S. cities.

Results across 8 cities studied showed cases were more common in conditions with low specific humidity and low temperature. More detailed analysis showed humidity levels were a significant predictor of cases in 3 cities.

The associations were small, and more analysis is needed over longer time periods and more locations, but the results suggest weather factors should be considered in infectious disease modeling efforts.

It is important to note that the results do not necessarily suggest that cases of COVID-19 will decline significantly in the summer.

Read more about their findings at https://bit.ly/3dh0n2L.

A growing body of research shows that weather conditions can influence the prevalence of some respiratory diseases and that the lower temperatures and humidity common in winter may have direct effects on both virus transmission and human susceptibility. With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, r...

06/18/2020
The Collider

The Collider

Today is #ShowYourStripes day! To celebrate, we're sharing our member Jared Rennie of the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS' warming stripes, which show temperature variations over the last century. Support climate change awareness by downloading and posting your county's stripes!

The Collider
06/09/2020
The Collider

The Collider

The North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS is responsible for co-creating assessments on climate change that influence policy and make scientific reports digestible to the public. We sat down (virtually) with two NCICS scientists to discuss increasing nighttime temperatures, why COVID-19 is a climate issue, and what post-COVID recovery could mean for climate policy.

Today, the NC Dept of Environmental Quality released the 2020 NC Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan, a comprehe...
06/02/2020
NC DEQ: Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan

Today, the NC Dept of Environmental Quality released the 2020 NC Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan, a comprehensive effort to address climate change vulnerability, guide state action, engage with stakeholders, and facilitate collaboration.

It assess vulnerability, risk, and resilience strategies for multiple sectors, including agriculture and forestry, coastal resources and infrastructure, health and human services, transportation, and energy. Other chapters focus on climate and environmental justice and nature-based solutions. The final chapter presents a path forward for a climate-resilient North Carolina.

The resilience plan draws heavily on the findings of the North Carolina Climate Science Report (https://ncics.org/programs/nccsr/), which provides a detailed look at observed and projected climate change across North Carolina. NCICS led the development of the Climate Science Report, which was authored by climate experts from across the state with support from the NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information Technical Support Unit and the NC State Climate Office.

Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan Preparing North Carolina for Future Climate Impacts As directed by Executive Order 80, the North Carolina Climate Risk Assessment and Resilience Plan is the state’s most comprehensive effort to date, based on science and stakeholder input, to address Nor...

The #COVID-19 "self-checker" tool developed by NCICS's Jen Runkle in conjunction with Buncombe County, NC, is now up and...
05/05/2020
Developing a COVID-19 Self-Checker for Buncombe County, North Carolina :: North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies

The #COVID-19 "self-checker" tool developed by NCICS's Jen Runkle in conjunction with Buncombe County, NC, is now up and running. The tool helps Buncombe County residents assess symptoms and risks, obtain testing, make decisions about medical care, and get daily check-ins.

In the first five days, 255 county residents used the self-checker, with 28 being directed to seek emergency care and more than 100 directed to seek testing. Learn more via the link below.

NCICS epidemiologist Dr. Jennifer Runkle worked with officials from Buncombe County, NC, to develop and release a COVID-19 “self-checker” tool for county residents. The tool helps residents assess potential symptoms and make decisions about seeking medical care while providing county public heal...

04/24/2020
Buncombe County Government

NCICS's Jen Runkle has been busy helping Buncombe County develop a #COVID19 "self-tracker" tool. The tool, which will be available soon, is designed both to help citizens who may be experiencing symptoms make decisions and to give county public health officials better information about the prevalence of COVID-19. You can learn more about the tool starting at about 7 minutes into the Facebook video linked below:

Regular Meeting of the Buncombe County Board of Commissioners' for April 21, 2020

UNC Asheville's National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC)
04/20/2020

UNC Asheville's National Environmental Modeling and Analysis Center (NEMAC)

Looking for some ways to learn about #climate this week? We worked with U.S. Global Change Research Program and North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS to develop a consistent graphical style for climate indicators. This collaboration focused on how data should be represented in order to accurately and effectively communicate the message. Check out the website to learn more about each one (and see the graphics)!

https://www.globalchange.gov/indicators

NC State College of Sciences
03/16/2020
NC State College of Sciences

NC State College of Sciences

Teaching online may seem daunting at first — especially if you’ve never taught online, are unfamiliar with learning technology tools or don’t have instructional videos ready to deploy. Here are some tips from College of Sciences faculty to help prepare for online teaching.

Thanks to WLOS ABC 13 for featuring the North Carolina Climate Science Report this week. Click the link below for web an...
03/13/2020
How the mountains could be impacted by increase in global temperatures

Thanks to WLOS ABC 13 for featuring the North Carolina Climate Science Report this week. Click the link below for web and video stories, including interviews with NCICS’s Ken Kunkel and Dave Easterling of NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information. #NCClimate https://wlos.com/news/local/how-the-mountains-could-be-impacted-by-increase-in-global-temperatures

A new report gives a look at life with climate change right here in Western North Carolina. WLOS. The report was released Wednesday from a group of researchers working with the North Carolina Center for Climate Studies. It is a statewide report that breaks down the climate trends and predictions for...

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
03/13/2020
NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

Supporting a multi-institution effort, we share the first North Carolina Climate Science Report, produced by authors and advisory panel members from around the state and the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS. We invite you to visit the link below to download a copy of the full report, the short report findings and executive summary, and a plain language summary of the key findings.

Today, NCICS released the North Carolina Climate Science Report, a scientific assessment of historical climate trends an...
03/11/2020
North Carolina Climate Science Report :: North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies

Today, NCICS released the North Carolina Climate Science Report, a scientific assessment of historical climate trends and potential future climate change in North Carolina under increased greenhouse gas concentrations.

The report includes an overview of global climate change followed by observed and projected changes for North Carolina, including temperature and precipitation averages and extremes, hurricanes and other storms, sea level rise, and other aspects of the climate system. Results are presented for the state as a whole and for three regions: the Western Mountains, the Piedmont, and the Coastal Plan.

This was a multi-institution effort, with authors and advisory panel members from around the state, including NCICS, NC State College of Sciences, Duke University, North Carolina A&T State University, East Carolina University, Coastal Studies Institute, the State Climate Office of North Carolina, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Appalachian State University, NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information, and the USGS/NCSU Southeast Climate Adaptation Center.

We invite you to visit the link below to download a copy of the full report, the short report findings and executive summary, and a plain language summary of the key findings.

The North Carolina Climate Science Report is a scientific assessment of historical climate trends and potential future climate change in North Carolina under increased greenhouse gas concentrations.

NCICS's Douglas Rao is one of the post-docs speaking at the "Spotlight on Postdocs" event on Saturday, March 21 at the N...
03/09/2020
Daily Planet Spotlight on Postdocs Programs and Events Calendar

NCICS's Douglas Rao is one of the post-docs speaking at the "Spotlight on Postdocs" event on Saturday, March 21 at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences in Raleigh. See the link below for details:

Join us in the globe of the Nature Research Center for an exciting round of lightning talks from researchers at NC State University. This event co-organized with Aurore Canoville and Melissa Whatley from the Postdoctoral Association at NCSU and Chris Smith from the Office of Postdoctoral Affairs at....

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information
02/28/2020

NOAA National Centers for Environmental Information

A new paper in the journal Climate, written by scientists at the North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS, NCEI, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and other institutions, suggests that the Arctic could be essentially ice-free in summer within fifteen years, although the models used in the study returned a wide range of projections. The results indicate that sea-ice models have room for improvement—and that the ice may disappear even more quickly than current global climate models project. https://www.ncei.noaa.gov/news/arctic-ice-study

You might have seen the Facebook live event with WLOS ABC 13 yesterday afternoon. Here's the story that aired on the sta...
02/20/2020
Mountains brace for first snow event in more than a year

You might have seen the Facebook live event with WLOS ABC 13 yesterday afternoon. Here's the story that aired on the station last night, featuring insights from Scott Stevens and Jared Rennie on snowfall here in Asheville:

It has been a quiet start to the season for the city of Asheville's salt yard. After a slow start to winter's snow, city officials said crews will begin working 12-hour shifts starting Thursday morning. (Photo credit: WLOS staff) The last time Asheville measured an inch or more of snow was in Decemb...

02/20/2020

The Asheville Museum of Science Science Pub event originally planned for today has been rescheduled for March 19.

Join NCICS's Jen Runkle and colleagues from the WNC Climate and Health Working Group for a discussion of climate change and human health, including actions and activities here in Western North Carolina aimed at responding to the challenges posed by climate change. We hope to see you on the 19th at The Collider!

Due to the snow event here in Asheville, tonight's Science Pub on climate and human health is cancelled. We expect it to...
02/20/2020

Due to the snow event here in Asheville, tonight's Science Pub on climate and human health is cancelled. We expect it to be rescheduled in the near future, so watch for updates. Safe travels to everyone in the area today!

Hey y'all! We're open till 3pm. Hope you'll come have snow much fun at #AshevilleMuseumofScience!

Please note, tonight's Science Pub is cancelled; we will advise when it will be rescheduled.

#schoolsout #snowday #STEAMTeam

Address

151 Patton Ave
Asheville, NC
28801

General information

NCICS: inspires cutting-edge research and collaboration; advances understanding of the current and future state of the climate; and engages with business, academia, government, and the public to enhance decision making.

Opening Hours

Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(828) 271-4912

Website

Alerts

Be the first to know and let us send you an email when North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS posts news and promotions. Your email address will not be used for any other purpose, and you can unsubscribe at any time.

Contact The University

Send a message to North Carolina Institute for Climate Studies - NCICS:

Videos

Nearby universities


Other Colleges & Universities in Asheville

Show All

Comments

Because the albedo/atmosphere reflect 30% of the incoming solar energy the earth is cooler with that albedo/atmosphere than without. Without an atmosphere the earth would receive 30% more kJ/h becoming a barren rock much like the moon, hot^3 on the lit side, cold^3 on the dark. This observation is easily confirmed by comparisons with the moon as Nikolov, Kramm suggest and UCLA Diviner mission observes. This refutes the RGHE theory which postulates just the opposite, that the earth sans atmosphere would be a -430 F ball of ice or 288 K w/ - 255 K w/o = 33 C cooler. (Rubbish!) Because of the non-radiative heat transfer processes of the contiguous participating atmospheric molecules, 396 W/m^2 of BB LWIR upwelling from the surface is not possible. As I demonstrate in the grand science tradition of performing experiments: https://principia-scientific.org/debunking-the-greenhouse-gas-theory-with-a-boiling-water-pot/ Without the 396 W/m^2 upwelling LWIR there is no net 333 W/m^2 for the GHGs to "trap", "back" radiate or warm anything anywhere. There is no radiative greenhouse effect and the so-called GHGs do not "warm" the terrestrial surface. Nick Schroeder, BSME CU ‘78 Colorado Springs, CO 80921
Thank you so much for being part of this great festival!
FASTER THAN EXPECTED Dr. Guy McPherson, is a Professor Emeritus of Natural Resources and Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona, the world's leading authority on Abrupt Climate Change leading to Near Term Human Extinction Human Extinction; that is, he is knowledgeable about the habitat necessary for human survival. As the global average temperature rises above a certain point, it's not that human beings can't live at higher temperatures, but that the plants that we and other animals depend upon for food cannot adapt fast enough and they die out. Based on these facts, and the abrupt rise in global average temperatures due to the predicted 50 Gigaton bursts or “burps” of methane in the Arctic Ocean this year or within the next two years, Dr. McPherson has written an article which includes a timeframe for virtual Human Extinction within 6-31 months from now:
Additionally, you show 10 spots or more in other states that are smaller geographically, but only 4 in Wyoming. And you pick Lander, WY that is barely in totality, again, ignoring Riverton with areas on centerline.
I have a serious concern about your interactive map. Riverton, WY, well-equipped with an NOAA weather station, is not included and, according to our data, has a better chance at clear skies than Casper, which you did include. Our communities are doing a lot to welcome and prepare for eclipse watchers. You do them, and us, a disservice by hiding some of the best places to view the 2017 eclipse.