American Universities' Services

American Universities' Services AUS is the premiere organization for university placement in the United States. Every year we place more than 1500 students before they leave their home countries.Email [email protected] for application information

Operating as usual

Timeline Photos
12/21/2012

Timeline Photos

12/21/2012

Dear Colleagues and Dear Students,

Happy holidays to all of you.
Here at American University Services we have had a wonderful and very successful year.
We added four new members and we will welcome three more at the beginning of this next year into our office in New York.
The success comes from all of you who cooperate with us.
We hope that all of our students will return back to their home countries feeling proud and happy with a bright future.

Please for your information, AUS offices will be closed Monday December 24, and Tuesday December 25, and back to our offices Wednesday through the Monday of December 31, then closed Tuesday, January 1, and Wednesday January 2, and back to work on Thursday, January 3.
At the time of closing, our emergency number will be available and ready to help you with any issue you may have as usual open 24/7, and can be reached at the phone: 1-801-729-5011.

Congratulations to everyone we work with on a great year and here’s to welcoming in another fantastic new year.

Best wishes,
American University services staff and administration

Dear Colleagues and Dear Students,Happy holidays to all of you.Here at American University Services we have had a wonder...
12/21/2012

Dear Colleagues and Dear Students,

Happy holidays to all of you.
Here at American University Services we have had a wonderful and very successful year.
We added four new members and we will welcome three more at the beginning of this next year into our office in New York.
The success comes from all of you who cooperate with us.
We hope that all of our students will return back to their home countries feeling proud and happy with a bright future.

Please for your information, AUS offices will be closed Monday December 24, and Tuesday December 25, and back to our offices Wednesday through the Monday of December 31, then closed Tuesday, January 1, and Wednesday January 2, and back to work on Thursday, January 3.
At the time of closing, our emergency number will be available and ready to help you with any issue you may have as usual open 24/7, and can be reached at the phone: 1-801-729-5011.

Congratulations to everyone we work with on a great year and here’s to welcoming in another fantastic new year.

Best wishes,
American University services staff and administration

Timeline Photos
07/24/2012

Timeline Photos

American Universities' Services's cover photo
05/18/2012

American Universities' Services's cover photo

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UAE, GCC need thousands of teachers in next five years The shortage of teachers in the region is also the second highest in the world. The UAE and GCC’s education sector holds bright prospects for teachers and the other general administration staff as demand will grow in coming years in line with surge in population across the region. The shortage of teachers in the region is also the second highest in the world as the profession is of less interest to the locals who prefer to work in highly paid public sector jobs. Although the region has a lower pupil-teacher ratio of 17 compared to the world average, the countries face challenges in recruiting highly qualified teachers. Growing demand for teachers at international schools in the UAE of at least 14,000 over the next five years and in Saudi Arabia of 183,600 by 2030 will pose further problems, Marmore Mena Intelligence said in its report “Is education still a good business in the GCC?” According to industry figures, GCC’s K-12 education market stood at $67 billion (Dh245.9 billion), of which the share of private schools accounted for $8.1 billion (Dh29.7 billion). MR Raghu, managing director of Marmore Mena Intelligence, says shortage of qualified staff is still a challenge faced by many institutions in the UAE. Private players need to offer salaries above the global average to attract quality staff. Over the period of next 3 years, about 10,000 staff are expected to be recruited. “Despite the projected entry of more players into the education sector, the demand is also expected to grow in the coming years. Thereby, the tuition fee is highly unlikely to decrease and is expected to grow at the existing rate,” he said. “We expect the number of UAE private schools to grow by five per cent in 2018 compared to the current year as enrollment is expected to rise.” Replying to a query whether the existing educational institutions meet requirements for the growing population in the UAE, Raghu said they would not be able to meet the demands as the enrollment levels are expected to increase over the next few years owing to the projected growth of the population between the ages zero to 18 Therefore, an influx of private institutions is expected in the coming years to meet the growing demand. Favourable demographics, rising disposable income, government initiatives and the willingness of parents to spend on education are expected to be key growth drivers for the education sector. The average spending for education in the UAE is nearly twice that of the global average and the average tuition fee for private institutions in the UAE has grown at a compound annual growth rate of five per cent since 2011. A recent study by HSBC disclosed that school fees in the UAE is the second-highest in the world. It found that the cost for sending a child to school in the UAE, from primary to university, will be around $99,378 (Dh365,025). According to Mahboob Murshed, managing director of Alpen Capital, the total number of students in the UAE is projected to grow at an annualised rate of 4.1 per cent, from an estimated 1.1 million in 2015 to 1.4 million in 2020; there are around 220 schools forecasted to be set up in the UAE by 2020. Irteza Ahmed, director of Investments at Amanat Holdings, which holds stakes in educational institutions including Madaares, says there is considerable planning and visibility regarding new schools opening in 2018 – and along with existing supply, these new schools will help address demand in the market. With respect to teachers, the UAE remains an attractive destination for teachers trained locally and across the globe. Ahmed sees overall tuition fees to remain stabilised in the UAE due in part to constructive initiatives by regulatory bodies such as the KHDA and ADEK. GCC education According to Mahboob Murshed, the population in the GCC is projected to reach close to 60 million in 2020, 40 per cent of whom are below 25 years of age. The total number of students in the GCC education is projected to grow at a CAGR of 3.6 per cent from an estimated 12.6 million in 2015 to reach 15 million in 2020. “Saudi Arabia will lead the way with almost 7,000 schools expected to come up in the kingdom in the next five years to meet the growing requirements and manage the current shortfall. On the other hand, the number of educational institutions in Dubai are heading for a potential oversupply and this may further intensify competition in the sector,” Murshed said. The demand for schools in the GCC region is likely to increase at a three per cent CAGR from an estimated 43,903 in 2015 to 50,978 in 2020. Saudi Arabia will continue to dominate the education market in the GCC. In terms of annualised growth during 2015 to 2020, the number of students in Oman, Qatar and the UAE are projected to grow faster than the other member nations, he added. From an estimated 9.2 million in 2015, the total number of students in Saudi Arabia is projected to grow at an annualised rate of 3.5 per cent to 11 million in 2020 signifying a requirement of more than 7,000 schools in the next five years in the kingdom. Saudi Arabia also aims to build 1,500 nurseries by 2020, he added.
3 Saudi universities receive top positions in QS rankings RIYADH: Three universities in the Kingdom have received top positions in the QS University Rankings for the Arab Region. The three universities which received five-star plus rankings include King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM), King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh and King Abdul Aziz University (KAU) in Jeddah. Dr. Thurayya Arrayed, one of the first 30 women on the Shoura Council, said: “I am very proud of every scientific indication that our established universities are doing well and congratulate them. I am sure other universities such as KAUST are shining too.” She said that every step Saudi Arabia takes toward excellence in its educational endeavors will be positive, and it is the need of the hour in this age of technology and research. “It is expected that our higher educational institutions should show signs of growing success in aligning their plans, performance, and projects with the National Transformation Program (NTP) 2020 and Vision 2030,” she concluded, saying that she expects better results in the near future. Shoura Council member Dr. Fayez Al-Shehri told Arab News that the remarkable performance of the three universities bears eloquent testimony to the contributions made by the government toward higher education. He pointed out that there are 35 universities which include 25 government institutions that receive the best support from the government to produce erudite citizens. Describing it as excellent news, Spanish Ambassador Alvaro Iranzo Gutiérrez, who holds a degree in law said: “Education is the cornerstone of the economic development and social program.” Bangladesh Ambassador Golam Moshi, a lawyer turned diplomat said that the achievement demonstrates a clear signal toward the road of a knowledge-based society. “The Kingdom, has been giving top priority to education for both males and females, and now it is bearing fruits,” the envoy added. A Saudi journalist based in Dubai, Musad Al-Zayani, who follows the region for his newspaper, said this is a sign of the forward march of Saudi Arabia. “It’s a matter for rejoicing when three universities from the same country receive five-star plus ratings,” Al-Zayani, who was a product of the King Abdul Aziz University said, adding that it is because of the integrated Vision of the Kingdom, which is planned by the leadership to forge ahead in the years to come. Congratulating the management of the three universities, Saudi writer Abdulhadi Habtor said it’s a remarkable achievement, and it clearly portrays the hard work rendered by these academic institutions. Habtor, who was also a student at the King Abdul Aziz University said it reflects the developmental strides in Saudi Arabia toward Vision 2030. “Let us not be complacent with this situation; we should focus on other universities in the country too,” he concluded.
Saudi minister says kingdom will not cover cost of private education The kingdom has cut scholarships for students attending private universities within Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia’s minister of education has reportedly told a group of Saudi students that the government will not provide financial aid for their education at private colleges and universities inside the kingdom. Saudi Gazette reports that Ahmed Al-Issa met with the medial students, doctors and specialists at 2:30pm on Sunday after they had waited near the Ministry of education for five hours. “The circumstances which prompted the introduction of the domestic scholarship programme for students in private universities do not exist any longer so the government is not obliged to provide them with financial support,” he was quoted as saying. Al-Issa went on to clarify that any student who opts to attend private university should bear the cost of his or her studies, saying the covering of expenses at private institutions would effectively make them government universities. This was despite protests from the group that they left their jobs to complete their higher education at private universities under the domestic scholarship programme only to find it had been stopped. The kingdom has reduced generous education allowances including study abroad programmes as part of reforms introduced to combat lower oil prices. In 2015 it allocated about $6bn to support students studying abroad but introduced new restrictions last year including the limiting of funding to those attending the top 100 universities globally. It also cut overall spending on education by 12 per cent in 2016, according to reports.