UGA Cortona Studies Abroad

UGA Cortona Studies Abroad For over 40 years, the University of Georgia Studies Abroad Program in Cortona, Italy offers a rich historical environment where students can easily integrate with the Italian lifestyle!
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Founded in 1970, the University of Georgia Studies Abroad Program in Cortona, Italy has been a leader in international arts education. This Program provides a challenging opportunity for the serious art student who wishes to combine international travel with an intensive studio and classroom experience. The medieval hilltown of Cortona offers a rich historical environment where students can easily integrate with the lifestyle of a typical Italian community.

Operating as usual

Rising behind the Basilica of Santa Margherita, at over 2000 feet above sea level, the Fortezza del Girifalco is the hig...
02/13/2021

Rising behind the Basilica of Santa Margherita, at over 2000 feet above sea level, the Fortezza del Girifalco is the highest elevation on our walking tour of Cortona. While there has likely been some type of stronghold in this location since the Etruscans settled the area in the 5th century BCE, the earliest written record of a fortress on the hilltop dates from 1258 CE. This medieval citadel, along with the rest of Cortona, was annexed by the Florentine Republic in 1411, and in 1527, the structure was joined with the walls surrounding the town. The Fortezza del Girifalco is often referred to as a “Medici fortress” because its 16th century restoration was decreed by the Grand Duke of Tuscany, Cosimo I de’ Medici. The fortress has not seen battle since the medieval period, and in 1776, it was disarmed and sold to the city of Cortona. Since then, the space has been used for a variety of purposes, including a prison, a storage facility for stone and wood, and a home for displaced children during WWII.

Today, the magnificent view afforded by the Fortezza del Girifalco makes the site a popular destination for tourists and photographers. The fortress itself now functions as a venue for cultural events such as wine-tastings, concerts, and art exhibitions, including Cortona On The Move, the city’s annual contemporary photography festival. The marble blocks on the overlook in front of the fortress are a favorite place for UGA students to gather and discuss their study abroad experiences as the sun sets over the Valdichiana.
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March 12th is the last day to apply to our Fall 2021 program. We'd love to have you :)
02/09/2021

March 12th is the last day to apply to our Fall 2021 program. We'd love to have you :)

The Basilica of Santa Margherita boasts one of the most breathtaking interiors in Cortona. Completed in 1897, the sanctu...
02/06/2021

The Basilica of Santa Margherita boasts one of the most breathtaking interiors in Cortona. Completed in 1897, the sanctuary’s decoration draws from Italy’s architectural traditions. The alternating bands of masonry, for example, can also be seen in the famous stripes of Siena’s cathedral. Similarly, the vaulted ceiling’s fields of vivid blue, punctuated by delicate stars, recall a pattern that was popular in early Renaissance churches. The basilica is dedicated to Santa Margherita, Cortona’s patron saint, whose incorrupt body is enshrined at the church’s crossing. The sanctuary also houses marble sculptures that depict the saint in life and in eternal repose, as well as the 13th century crucifix that legend says spoke to her in 1277.

In 1917, a chapel inside the basilica was dedicated to soldiers from Cortona who served during WWI. The names of the soldiers are recorded on the chapel walls, and some of their likenesses may be seen in a fresco which depicts Santa Margherita petitioning Christ on their behalf. The quietly tranquil and architecturally majestic space creates an ideal atmosphere for reflecting on the lives of Cortona’s heroes and their protective patron saint.

On a UGA Cortona study abroad program, you'll not only learn remarkable things in our classes and on our excursions to I...
02/03/2021

On a UGA Cortona study abroad program, you'll not only learn remarkable things in our classes and on our excursions to Italian cities, you'll also make lifelong friends. Alumni, tag two people with whom you need to reunite ASAP in Cortona!

#ugacortona #studyabroad #studyabroaditaly #studyartinitaly #uga #ugastudyabroad #dawgsabroad #ugacortonaalumni #cortona

Don't forget, the deadline to apply for our Fall 2021 program is March 12th!
02/01/2021

Don't forget, the deadline to apply for our Fall 2021 program is March 12th!

From one of the highest elevations on our walking tour, the Basilica of Santa Margherita overlooks Cortona. Dedicated to...
01/30/2021

From one of the highest elevations on our walking tour, the Basilica of Santa Margherita overlooks Cortona. Dedicated to the town’s patron saint, the church rests on land where people have worshiped since the 11th century. The original structure, a small oratory dedicated to San Basilio, was important to Santa Margherita during her life. After her death in 1297, it was decided to erect a basilica to house her relics. Completed in 1304, the church was expanded after Santa Margherita was canonized in 1728. The current façade was finished in 1896, and preserves the 14th century rose window. Elevated to the status of Minor Basilica in 1927, the church remains a vital part of the Cortonese community. UGA students often visit the basilica to experience Cortona’s rich history, spiritual traditions, and architectural beauty.

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If you are a UGA Cortona alumnus who has participated in the Young Americans Radio Show, you know Andrea Canoba Caneschi...
01/29/2021
CORTONA 70s - Bischeri A Mano Armata "Il Manufatto" - Trailer ufficiale

If you are a UGA Cortona alumnus who has participated in the Young Americans Radio Show, you know Andrea Canoba Caneschi, and if you are a UGA Cortona alumnus from our first decade of study abroad programs, you know Cortona in the 1970s. All of you, listen up: Andrea has dedicated his life to making a crazy, dangerous, funny, dramatic, retro, parodic, irreverent, sometimes offensive, and very well-crafted heist film, set in 1970s Cortona and starring the coolest and most moronic butterfly-collared cops you’ve ever seen on the big screen, as well as a fabulous cast of characters drawn straight from Cortona’s citizenry. The old Foxes disco even makes an appearance! Check out the trailer (subtitled in English!) and then start making plans to come to Cortona for the premiere, which will take place… well, sometime after this COVID thing is over. We’ll keep you posted! In the meantime, follow the film’s page at Cortona 70’s. Bischeri A Mano Armata. “Il Manufatto”! https://www.facebook.com/Cortona-70s-Bischeri-A-Mano-Armata-Il-Manufatto-111247253577694

1976: un pericoloso criminale internazionale, Tito Maccarones, si aggira per le strade di un delizioso borgo toscano, intenzionato ad impadronirsi di un prez...

What would you do with 24 hours in Cortona right now?
01/28/2021

What would you do with 24 hours in Cortona right now?

No matter what your interest, we have a place for you!  Hone your artistic abilities with our unique programs. Use the l...
01/26/2021

No matter what your interest, we have a place for you! Hone your artistic abilities with our unique programs. Use the link in our bio to see more information and apply now!

The mosaics of Cortona’s Via Crucis, positioned along Via Santa Margherita, were created by artist Gino Severini in 1946...
01/22/2021

The mosaics of Cortona’s Via Crucis, positioned along Via Santa Margherita, were created by artist Gino Severini in 1946, following WWII. Born in Cortona, Severini became a leading figure in the movement of Italian Futurist painting during the early 20th century. The Via Crucis mosaics demonstrate his artistic brilliance as well as the pride that he took in his heritage. Upon receiving the commission for the project, Severini responded, “I received your letter . . . with great excitement. I have lived in these very sad times in great isolation, expressing, in my own way, my protest against the absurd war in which we all suffer the consequences. I had practically given up . . . the desire to work in mosaic again. And then, here is your letter that gives me the chance to do something important in my own city of Cortona.” Severini’s reinvigorated enthusiasm is evident in these panels, which blend the ancient technique of mosaic with the pioneering modern compositions that the artist is known for. These bold arrangements continue to dazzle 75 years after their installation, exemplifying the Italian tradition of artistic innovation that inspires the students of UGA Cortona.
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Una cartolina per Cortona: Dear Cortona, you are always in my heart!Summer of 1978Joan Body 🇺🇸💌🇮🇹All the postcards are n...
01/17/2021

Una cartolina per Cortona:

Dear Cortona, you are always in my heart!
Summer of 1978
Joan Body

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All the postcards are now on display together as part of the Cortona 2020 exhibition, on view in the Margie E. West Gallery at the Lamar Dodd School of Art in Athens, Georgia through January 23.

Visit the galleries weekdays 9:00am - 4:00pm
closed on holidays
270 River Road, Athens GA 30602
visitors required to wear a mask and maintain six feet of distance from other visitors
for more information: https://art.uga.edu/galleries/la-mostra-cortona-2020

Continuing our walking tour up Via Santa Margherita, we approach the mosaics of Cortona’s Via Crucis, or Way of the Cros...
01/15/2021

Continuing our walking tour up Via Santa Margherita, we approach the mosaics of Cortona’s Via Crucis, or Way of the Cross. Created by Gino Severini in 1946, these 15 panels are housed in stone aediculae spaced roughly every forty meters along the steep uphill street. Severini’s colorful mosaics attract art enthusiasts, but they also serve an important dual religious function for the faithful. The sequential narrative of these images presents the story of Christ’s walk to Calvary, reminding viewers of his suffering. Commissioned at the end of WWII, the monuments also pay tribute to Cortona’s patron saint, Santa Margherita, for protecting the city from air raids during the conflict. Significantly, the series of mosaics begins at the Porta Berarda, where the saint is said to have first entered Cortona, and ends at the Basilica of Santa Margherita, where her relics lie. Following the progress of The Via Crucis, UGA Cortona students have a chance to reflect upon the spiritual traditions and history of Cortona, as rendered by one of the city’s greatest artists.
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It’s Mostra Time!!  (It feels good to say that… it’s been a while!)This year, the Cortona Reunion Exhibition at the Lama...
01/14/2021

It’s Mostra Time!! (It feels good to say that… it’s been a while!)

This year, the Cortona Reunion Exhibition at the Lamar Dodd School of Art in Athens, Georgia is substantially smaller than usual, but it tells a powerful story: that of an international experience cut short by emergency evacuation, and the adaptability and resilience of our Spring 2020 students and instructors who continued classes remotely to finish up the semester with our first ever Virtual Mostra. Now, the very first works these students made in Cortona have been brought together with their final artworks of the semester in one exhibition, on view in the Margie E. West Gallery at the Lamar Dodd School of Art through January 23.

Also on view in the Bridge Gallery through January 23 is “What’s Here / Cos’è qui”, works by UGA Cortona’s 2019-20 Visiting Artist, Bryan Parnham.

Visit the galleries weekdays 9:00 am - 4:00 pm
closed on holidays
270 River Road, Athens GA

Welcome back to campus! The Fall 2021 UGA Cortona Program application deadline is just around the corner! Why not plan t...
01/13/2021

Welcome back to campus! The Fall 2021 UGA Cortona Program application deadline is just around the corner! Why not plan to spend your fall with us in Cortona, Italy? #ugacortona #studyabroadinitaly

One of the most fascinating structures along Via Santa Margherita, the church of San Marco was built in 1580 on the site...
01/11/2021

One of the most fascinating structures along Via Santa Margherita, the church of San Marco was built in 1580 on the site of a medieval hospital where Santa Margherita is said to have cared for the sick. The church was originally the seat of the Company of the Holy Trinity of the Laity, but when that order was suppressed in 1785 by Grand Duke Leopold of Tuscany, the site was rededicated to San Marco, a patron saint of Cortona. The church has two levels, the lower of which has a beautifully frescoed vaulted ceiling. Painted in the 18th century by an unknown artist, the fresco depicts the Assumption of the Virgin Mary to Heaven. The lunettes below it, also of anonymous authorship, were painted a century earlier, and present sacred moments from the Virgin’s life. The church also houses a 17th century statue of Christ Praying in the Garden of Olives, which is carried every year in the traditional Good Friday procession -- an opportunity for UGA Cortona students to witness the reverence and majesty of one of Cortona's most important religious rituals.
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The vivid mosaic that adorns the façade of the Church of San Marco is one of many impressive sites along Via Santa Margh...
01/08/2021

The vivid mosaic that adorns the façade of the Church of San Marco is one of many impressive sites along Via Santa Margherita. This 16th century church was dedicated to San Marco, one of the patron saints of Cortona, towards the end of the 18th century. The mosaic was created in 1961 by Cortonese artist Gino Severini. Employing the Italian Futurist style that he helped make famous, Severini rendered San Marco with vibrant colors and sharp angles. The saint is accompanied by his traditional lion attribute, which declares his identity as an evangelist. The book that San Marco points to bears Latin text that translates to “According to Mark,” establishing him as the author of a gospel. The famous clock tower of Cortona’s Palazzo Comunale rises behind the figure; its presence in the mosaic connects the past to the present by depicting a popular site where UGA Cortona students often gather to socialize or sketch.
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The next stop on our walking tour is UGA Cortona's "Severini School", named for Cortona-born 20th-century artist Gino Se...
01/06/2021

The next stop on our walking tour is UGA Cortona's "Severini School", named for Cortona-born 20th-century artist Gino Severini (more about Severini's work in future posts!). Formerly a girls' school that taught cooking, sewing, and other homemaking skills, the building now houses UGA Cortona's printmaking, photography, drawing, papermaking and book arts, landscape architecture, and interior design studios. This photo from last winter shows Sev's beautiful wisteria pergola under a light blanket of snow.
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“La colomba della pace,” or “The Dove of Peace,” was sculpted by UGA Cortona founder John D. Kehoe in 1994, and now stan...
01/04/2021

“La colomba della pace,” or “The Dove of Peace,” was sculpted by UGA Cortona founder John D. Kehoe in 1994, and now stands in Cortona’s city park. The artist used two different marbles, quarried in Italy and Georgia, in order to illustrate the special relationships that UGA Cortona encourages. Seeing the unchanging marble dusted with snow reminds us that while seasons may change, the bonds between UGA and Cortona are strong and enduring!
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New Year's Day is a great opportunity to take a walk outside the gates of Cortona. The Convent of Le Celle lies a little...
01/01/2021

New Year's Day is a great opportunity to take a walk outside the gates of Cortona. The Convent of Le Celle lies a little over two miles from the city, nestled in the holly oak and cypress groves below Monte Sant’Egidio. The hermitage was established circa 1211 by Saint Francis, who used it as a place of rest and devotion on his travels between Assisi and Siena. Care of Le Celle was given over to an order of Capuchin Friars in 1537, and a small number of them continue to inhabit the sacred grounds today. In keeping with the teachings of Saint Francis, Le Celle’s immersion in nature promotes quiet contemplation, and many UGA Cortona students have found inspiration in its tranquil beauty. 🇺🇸🕊🇮🇹

This New Year's Eve, to help fight the spread of COVID-19, Cortona will forego its usual raucous celebration in the cent...
12/31/2020

This New Year's Eve, to help fight the spread of COVID-19, Cortona will forego its usual raucous celebration in the central piazza. Instead, the masked Cortonese may quietly stroll past San Domenico in the evening, enjoy the beauty of the sunset over the valley and the illumination of the city's light display at the overlook, then head home before curfew to pop their prosecco corks at midnight with family. Please be safe tonight, everyone, and here's hoping for a better 2021 for all!
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#ugacortona #cortona #winter #holidays #walkingtour #studyabroaditaly #cirivediamopresto

This New Year's Eve, to help fight the spread of COVID-19, Cortona will forego its usual raucous celebration in the cent...
12/31/2020

This New Year's Eve, to help fight the spread of COVID-19, Cortona will forego its usual raucous celebration in the central piazza. Instead, the masked Cortonese may quietly stroll past San Domenico in the evening, enjoy the beauty of the sunset over the valley and the illumination of the city's light display at the overlook, then head home before curfew to pop their prosecco corks at midnight with family. Please be safe tonight, everyone, and here's hoping for a better 2021 for all!
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This photo from a Christmas Past shows the Gruppo Storico Sbandieratori e Musici di Cortona marching into Piazza della R...
12/29/2020

This photo from a Christmas Past shows the Gruppo Storico Sbandieratori e Musici di Cortona marching into Piazza della Repubblica, where they then performed a tattoo of drumming and flag-throwing for a crowd of townspeople and visitors. If you have visited Cortona during the holidays, what was your favorite thing about being there at this time of year?
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We are proud to share that Michelle Morguarge, alumna of UGA Cortona’s Fall 2019 program, won Best Overall Photo in UGA’...
12/29/2020

We are proud to share that Michelle Morguarge, alumna of UGA Cortona’s Fall 2019 program, won Best Overall Photo in UGA’s Study Away Photo and Video Contest with this image captured during our excursion to Venice that semester. The happy faces of Jordan, Rhea, and Michelle bring back great memories!

Michelle says, “Cortona showed me another world beyond the cultures that I have grown so accustomed to. The sites, the artwork, the history, the scenery, the people. My experience in this town has positively affected my experience in life, and I can’t wait to see what is next, and what else is out there! Very thankful to have had the opportunity to spend time in the town of the Cortonese. Grazie mille.”

Grazie a te, Michelle, and congratulations - we, too, can’t wait to see what you do next!

This Friday, January 1, New Year's Day, join us in Cortona via live stream for the event “Look Listen Live MAEC”!  The s...
12/28/2020

This Friday, January 1, New Year's Day, join us in Cortona via live stream for the event “Look Listen Live MAEC”! The show will feature a live concert by the Cor Orchestra, performing Mozart, Beethoven, Rossini and Mascagni, and guest appearances by “Under the Tuscan Sun” author Frances Mayes, UGA Cortona Director Christopher Robinson, film director Mike Pecci, actor Alessio Boni, and writer Maurizio De Giovanni, as well as other surprises! The event begins at 6:00 PM in Cortona / 12:00 noon EST, and can be found on the pages of the Comune di Cortona, Maec Cortona, and Cortona Social Media.
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Buone Feste a tutti!🇺🇸🎄🇮🇹#ugacortona #cortona #winter #holidays  #studyabroaditaly #cirivediamopresto
12/25/2020

Buone Feste a tutti!
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#ugacortona #cortona #winter #holidays #studyabroaditaly #cirivediamopresto

Buona vigilia di Natale a tutti!  Today, Christmas Eve, we walk down to an alley below the Duomo to visit one of Cortona...
12/24/2020

Buona vigilia di Natale a tutti! Today, Christmas Eve, we walk down to an alley below the Duomo to visit one of Cortona's presepi - the traditional, hand-crafted nativity scenes present in every Italian home and every Italian comune during the Christmas season. The unassuming door is marked only by a Bethlehem star (or the conjunction of Saturn and Jupiter?), from which we descend into a gloomy subterranean cavern filled with choral music. Suddenly, light dawns upon a familiar scene: Cortona, represented by Via Ianelli, the Duomo, and outside a city gate, Santa Maria Nuova in the distance. In a separate vignette, Fra Angelico's famous Annunciation painting is represented in a three-dimensional model. And on the right side of the scene, Mary, Joseph, and baby Jesus are protected by hovering Luca Signorelli angels. If we are patient, we can watch the light change from darkest night to dawn, to day, to sunset, and back to night. In a normal year, the presepi of Italy would be jammed with visitors; this year, we contemplate the scene in complete solitude. Wishing all the UGA Cortona family a peaceful and safe Christmas Eve...
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#ugacortona #cortona #winter #holidays #walkingtour #presepe #studyabroaditaly #cirivediamopresto

Address

1324 South Lumpkin Street
Athens, GA
30602

General information

The Cortona Program offers courses Spring, Summer, and Fall semesters (and select specialized courses during "Maymester", between Spring and Summer) in Art Education, Art History, Ceramics, Creative Writing, Drawing, English, Graphic Design, Conversational Italian Lanugage, Italian Culture, Interior Design, Jewelry & Metalwork, Landscape Architecture, Painting, Papermaking & Bookarts, Photography, Printmaking, Sculpture, Drama, Science/Biology, and Viticulture & Enology

Telephone

(706) 542-7120

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Ciao! We formed a new group for FALL 1998 UGA Cortona alumni. Please join us!!!! Would be great to catch up after all this time. https://www.facebook.com/groups/325701578488694
UGA Studies Abroad Cortona 1988
I want to take a moment to thank all the staff in Cortona that helped all our students get home safely. Thank you! It was very much appreciated.
Can anyone from the 1978 classes post their group photo? My dad studied abroad in ‘78 and then I did in ‘05 - I’d love to share this with him!
The dog shelter of Cortona, also known as the Canile di Ossaia, is having a crowdfunding campaign! Read all about it in the link below. We've even included some photos of your students' visit last fall. Happy Holidays!
Hi there, I'm trying to get in touch with Ken Williams (Cortona 1987 professor). Please private message me his email or contact information if you have it. Thank you! Melissa
I am back in Cortona after 32 years! We are looking for the best pizza in Cortona. I’m sure the trattoria where I ate so long ago isn’t there. Can anyone make a recommendation?
The Purpose of Life …is Life Robert Magill [email protected] The sole purpose of life, and therefore our only human purpose may simply be, life itself. That, upon reflection, would appear to be almost enough. The life force does have its urges though, lots of them, it would appear. After countless eons of self-replication along came sexual reproduction, life had apparently gotten to be in somewhat more of a hurry. Life then pursued bigger and better forms of itself as mobility, size, vision etc. ensued over time. Vision was very unique and a promising end in itself, but life appeared to desire a different platform with which to fully employ this new sense. Many prototypes came and went, and eventually on the scene appeared humankind complete with a newly acquired awareness. Did life, with this move, express desire for an ego to admire itself or, more positively, to express itself? Why else create a platform embellished with consciousness? Then, alas, something went very wrong with life’s dedicated pursuit of life? Human behavior. We know large portions of the recent history of our species and it's not very good. Considering our known history, can we begin to significantly amend our ways if life demands a timely accounting? So if and when life decides we have exhausted all possibility of further usefulness, and our excesses overwhelm life's other vital interests, do we then risk severance of the thread with life? Should not we begin to tug ever more gently at this tether to lessen our risk? Does life even care about the fate of us, its creature? Probably not, countless other species have traveled along on life's quest, prospered to a degree and vanished. Will we join them? Whence came then, this thing, this awareness, this brightness in the void, so cherished by life our very species could be made forfeit to preserve it? Perhaps it was the animal curiosity of some lumbering hominid possessed of sufficient cranial matter that chanced upon a source. The menu of vegetable suspects is quite large. The plants, cacti, mushrooms and vines that possess the chemical soups that have the ability, and perhaps desire to exert themselves aggressively when combined with suitable host brain, is legion. We currently regard these substances as “mind altering” but could they perhaps have been “mind creating” at some remote point in time? Students of psychedelic phenomenon have reported a tendency among this family of substances to exhibit a strong urge to promote its own agenda over the host consciousness at times. Life, in this way, may have introduced the initial spark of awareness in receptive hominid brains with suitable vegetable matter containing psychedelic chemical ingredients. Imagine the wonder this revelation surely produced in a previously unconscious world. The binges and quest for more light shows that followed in the still only partially illuminated minds of these creatures must have been incredible. Perhaps this initial visitation of consciousness onto a receptive human brain and the incredible awakening produced therein is responsible for the ongoing human quest for enlightenment. Our species has demonstrated a universal affinity for various visions, ecstasies and raptures and they have been zealously sought for millennia. Perhaps then, a racial memory of, and longing for a return to that original staggering event gives impetus to the universal spiritual quests we humans faithfully follow to this day. Of course it is possible life may now be providing itself with a non-life fallback to the dilemma posed by our misuse of awareness and consciousness. If humankind becomes suspect of probable catastrophic losses to many of its other progeny, life then may seek to substitute Artificial Intelligence for flawed human intelligence. We, ourselves, may rapidly be creating the instruments for our future replacement with life's resigned encouragement. Life may value this tediously acquired awareness beyond all measure. More the pity for humankind. These phenomena are unique on the planet; life, the life force and the awareness/consciousness of one primate species. What we regard as ultimate reality is simply the stories we tell ourselves and others combined with whatever actions humans are capable of accomplishing. Humanity must now learn to live with 5 Gigabit technology becoming a reality and should perhaps begin to wonder which future Gigabit number will be the one to provide the artificial intelligence and awareness deemed sufficient by the life force to render human beings redundant if it chooses to do so?
Summer 1987 - I'm not sure if this photo has been posted before. Great memories!
Journalism student needs to interview several students who have been to Cortona through the Lamar Dodd school. If you would be willing to spare a few moments this week, please leave comment or text 770 241-2280. Thanks, Olyn
La Passione in Tuscany June 9 -- Details to come! ❤️
Sheri Schumacker at the student table ( Tonino's)