Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University

Africana Studies and Research Center at Cornell University Follow us on Twitter @AfricanaCU In 1969, and in the wake of the historic, student-led takeover of Willard Straight Hall on campus, the Africana Studies and Research Center (ASRC) at Cornell University became the birthplace of the field of Africana Studies.

At the same time, like San Francisco State, it represented one of the nation's earliest departments established in Black Studies. Since its origination at Cornell, the field of Africana Studies has been increasingly embraced and universalized as a discipline in academic programs and departments at colleges and universities around the nation. That is to say, many programs and departments have increasingly adopted the name "Africana" to signal their investments in interdisciplinary methodologies and in examining blackness comparatively in global and diaspora perspective. We are proud to literally be the pioneers in having established "Africana" as a concept and remain actively involved in advancing its development theoretically and pedagogically toward yet new directions and new horizons. Just what IS Africana Studies? The African American historian and emeritus professor from this department, Robert L. Harris, offers a useful definition of the field in Jacqueline Bobo, Cynthia Hudley and Claudine Michel's anthology The Black Studies Reader: "Africana Studies is the multidisciplinary analysis of the lives and thought of people of African ancestry on the African continent and throughout the world. It embraces Africa, Afro-America, and the Caribbean, but does not confine itself to those three geographical areas. Africana Studies examines people of African ancestry wherever they may be found—for example, in Central and South America, Asia, and the Pacific Islands. Its primary means of organization are racial and cultural. Many of the themes of Africana Studies are derived from the historical position of African peoples in relation to Western societies and in the dynamics of slavery, oppression, colonization, imperialism, emancipation, self-determination, liberation, and socioeconomic and political development." In the twenty-first century and nearly fifty years after its inception, the ASRC remains committed to continuing academic innovation in this field and to remaining at its forefront theoretically and pedagogically, while sustaining its ongoing commitments to activism and community engagement. The ASRC has continued to be a site of critical and theoretical dialogues related to topics such as the philosophy of "Africana Thought." The department, whose research is supported and enabled by its John Henrik Clarke Library, has advanced toward a more central engagement with gender and sexuality in areas such as Africana women's studies and black q***r studies. As an institution, the ASRC has increasingly shaped the "new Africana Studies." The work of this field is significant and exceptional at Cornell and in the larger profession for its consistent and sustained critical and theoretical engagement of the concept of race. This engagement can be found in the overall models and methods of teaching at Cornell that are truly dynamic. In recent years, the ASRC's commitments to scholarship and activism have been evident in the faculty's development of programs and projects related to topics, such as the prison industrial complex, the crisis of Darfur in Sudan, race and the presidency, academic labor, the black radical intellectual tradition, Trayvon Martin and Rachel Jeantel, and the protests in Ferguson, Missouri. The ASRC extends the teaching and learning opportunities that we provide in both our undergraduate and graduate classrooms well beyond to service learning projects and community initiatives from local to transnational contexts.

Operating as usual

We're halfway through our series, and every week is packed with incredible power and insight! Next Thursday, May 13 at 5...
05/11/2021

We're halfway through our series, and every week is packed with incredible power and insight! Next Thursday, May 13 at 5 PM EST/4PM CST/2 PM PST, join Boricuas Unidos en la Diáspora - BUDPR, Center for Popular Democracy, #CanceltheDebt Campaign, the Debt Collective and our moderator Dr. Tao Leigh Goffe from Cornell University for our 5th panel of the LANDFALL Discussion Series: "Mortgaged Futures: Debt & Disaster Capitalism." Register and receive a FREE sneak preview link to view the film (film links are generally being sent out Fridays): https://www.landfallfilm.com/series
Estamos a mitad de camino con nuestra serie, y cada semana está repleta de poder y enriquecimiento! El jueves que viene, 13 de mayo a las 5 PM EST/4PM CST/2 PM PST, únete a Boricuas Unidos en la Diáspora - BUDPR, Center for Popular Democracy, #CanceltheDebt Campaign, el Debt Collective y nuestra moderadora la Dra. Tao Leigh Goffe de la Universidad de Cornell para nuestro 5to panel de la Serie de Conversaciones de LANDFALL: "Futuros Hipotecados: Deuda y Capitalismo de Desastre." Regístrate y recibe un enlace GRATIS para un estreno preliminar del documental (los enlaces por lo general se están enviando los viernes): https://www.landfallfilm.com/serie

We're halfway through our series, and every week is packed with incredible power and insight! Next Thursday, May 13 at 5 PM EST/4PM CST/2 PM PST, join Boricuas Unidos en la Diáspora - BUDPR, Center for Popular Democracy, #CanceltheDebt Campaign, the Debt Collective and our moderator Dr. Tao Leigh Goffe from Cornell University for our 5th panel of the LANDFALL Discussion Series: "Mortgaged Futures: Debt & Disaster Capitalism." Register and receive a FREE sneak preview link to view the film (film links are generally being sent out Fridays): https://www.landfallfilm.com/series
Estamos a mitad de camino con nuestra serie, y cada semana está repleta de poder y enriquecimiento! El jueves que viene, 13 de mayo a las 5 PM EST/4PM CST/2 PM PST, únete a Boricuas Unidos en la Diáspora - BUDPR, Center for Popular Democracy, #CanceltheDebt Campaign, el Debt Collective y nuestra moderadora la Dra. Tao Leigh Goffe de la Universidad de Cornell para nuestro 5to panel de la Serie de Conversaciones de LANDFALL: "Futuros Hipotecados: Deuda y Capitalismo de Desastre." Regístrate y recibe un enlace GRATIS para un estreno preliminar del documental (los enlaces por lo general se están enviando los viernes): https://www.landfallfilm.com/serie

Thursday May 13, 2021 2:25PMFABRICATING ARCHIVES OF AFRICAN HISTORYJoin HIST 2452 - Dress, Cloth and Identity in Africa ...
05/10/2021

Thursday May 13, 2021 2:25PM
FABRICATING ARCHIVES OF AFRICAN HISTORY
Join HIST 2452 - Dress, Cloth and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora - for the launch of our on-line exhibit
HTTPS://CORNELL.ZOOM.US/J/98737014343?PWD=EITMT3JUCZBIBU9ENWVWU1ARTNNRDZ09

Thursday May 13, 2021 2:25PM
FABRICATING ARCHIVES OF AFRICAN HISTORY
Join HIST 2452 - Dress, Cloth and Identity in Africa and the Diaspora - for the launch of our on-line exhibit
HTTPS://CORNELL.ZOOM.US/J/98737014343?PWD=EITMT3JUCZBIBU9ENWVWU1ARTNNRDZ09

Zoom Professor Series: "Higher Education in Africa during the 21st century: Necessary Transformation for the development...
05/07/2021

Zoom Professor Series: "Higher Education in Africa during the 21st century: Necessary Transformation for the development of the continent"

Join ISU for a Zoom Professor Series event with Professor N'dri Assié-Lumumba on May 10 (Mon) from 6:30PM to 7:30 PM. During the event, Professor Assié-Lumumba will be speaking about higher education and the necessary transformations for education development on the African continent. Her talk will be followed by a Q&A session that’s open to all attendees.

https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0tdu2sqD0jHtWdeGdQeAa7szjIytkXCS2v

Zoom Professor Series: "Higher Education in Africa during the 21st century: Necessary Transformation for the development of the continent"

Join ISU for a Zoom Professor Series event with Professor N'dri Assié-Lumumba on May 10 (Mon) from 6:30PM to 7:30 PM. During the event, Professor Assié-Lumumba will be speaking about higher education and the necessary transformations for education development on the African continent. Her talk will be followed by a Q&A session that’s open to all attendees.

https://cornell.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJ0tdu2sqD0jHtWdeGdQeAa7szjIytkXCS2v

Monday, May 10, 2:45 – 4:00 pm ESTLiving and Creating in Nigeria in the Era of COVID-19Speaker: Aduke Gomez, Chair of th...
05/06/2021

Monday, May 10, 2:45 – 4:00 pm EST
Living and Creating in Nigeria in the Era of COVID-19
Speaker: Aduke Gomez, Chair of the Steering Committee of Art4Life, Lagos State Ministry of Health, Nigeria

https://events.cornell.edu/event/living_and_creating_in_nigeria_in_the_era_of_covid-19

Monday, May 10, 2:45 – 4:00 pm EST
Living and Creating in Nigeria in the Era of COVID-19
Speaker: Aduke Gomez, Chair of the Steering Committee of Art4Life, Lagos State Ministry of Health, Nigeria

https://events.cornell.edu/event/living_and_creating_in_nigeria_in_the_era_of_covid-19

Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:00pm to 5:30pmIn 1969, following the civil rights movement, amid student protests nationally...
05/04/2021

Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:00pm to 5:30pm

In 1969, following the civil rights movement, amid student protests nationally and in the wake of the historic student-led occupation of Willard Straight Hall on the Cornell campus, the Africana Studies & Research Center (ASRC) at Cornell University was formally established as the trailblazer of field of Africana Studies as an academic field committed to rigorous intellectual knowledge production and learning with critical capacity applied to social transformation. It was conceptualized as an interdisciplinary academic field with a focus on global Africa encompassing the African continent and the Diaspora. Opened in Fall 1969, under the leadership of its founding Director, Professor James Turner, the center initially offered an undergraduate major, a robust master’s degree and about forty years later, a PhD program was created. The celebration of fifty years after its inception is critical and fosters forward-looking reflections on the remarkable journey of arguably the most far-reaching academic innovation of the second half of the 20th century. This celebration calls for the need to reclaim the pioneering role of Africana Studies at Cornell University by ensuring its agility to respond to the new national and global dynamics in academia and society at large and remain at the forefront in theoretical and pedagogical innovations while sustaining its commitment to activism and community engagement.
https://events.cornell.edu/event/the_imperative_of_utuubuntu_in_scholarship_if_africana_studies_and_research_are_to_be_celebrated_as_liberated_zones_in_academia

Wednesday, May 5, 2021 at 4:00pm to 5:30pm

In 1969, following the civil rights movement, amid student protests nationally and in the wake of the historic student-led occupation of Willard Straight Hall on the Cornell campus, the Africana Studies & Research Center (ASRC) at Cornell University was formally established as the trailblazer of field of Africana Studies as an academic field committed to rigorous intellectual knowledge production and learning with critical capacity applied to social transformation. It was conceptualized as an interdisciplinary academic field with a focus on global Africa encompassing the African continent and the Diaspora. Opened in Fall 1969, under the leadership of its founding Director, Professor James Turner, the center initially offered an undergraduate major, a robust master’s degree and about forty years later, a PhD program was created. The celebration of fifty years after its inception is critical and fosters forward-looking reflections on the remarkable journey of arguably the most far-reaching academic innovation of the second half of the 20th century. This celebration calls for the need to reclaim the pioneering role of Africana Studies at Cornell University by ensuring its agility to respond to the new national and global dynamics in academia and society at large and remain at the forefront in theoretical and pedagogical innovations while sustaining its commitment to activism and community engagement.
https://events.cornell.edu/event/the_imperative_of_utuubuntu_in_scholarship_if_africana_studies_and_research_are_to_be_celebrated_as_liberated_zones_in_academia

Do Africans need Karl Marx?5/4/2021 Noon EST"But such debates raise the fundamental question—what is Marxism, and who is...
05/03/2021
Do Africans need Karl Marx?

Do Africans need Karl Marx?
5/4/2021 Noon EST
"But such debates raise the fundamental question—what is Marxism, and who is a Marxist? For his part, not even Marx considered himself one. There are those who believe that Marxism is a living school of thought and practice, open to internal critique and revision when confronting new realities; and those who see it as static and doctrinaire. Who should we believe? Joining us on AIAC Talk to debate if the third world still needs Marx are Annie Olaloku-Teriba and Zeyad el Nabolsy. Annie is an independent researcher based in London, working on legacies of empire and the complex histories of race; and Zeyad is a PhD student in Africana Studies at Cornell University, working on African philosophy of culture, African Marxism, and the philosophy of science and modern African intellectual history.
Stream the show the show on Tuesday at 18:00 in Cairo, 17:00 in London, and 12:00 in New York on YouTube."
https://africasacountry.com/2021/05/does-africa-still-need-marx

The day before Marx’s birthday, AIAC talk considers his legacy, and debates whether his ideas are still relevant. Watch the show Tuesday on our YouTube channel.

05/02/2021

ICM is delighted to host Maryam Wasif Khan for a virtual talk about her exceptional new book, Who Is a Muslim? Orientalism and Literary Populisms.
Register here:
https://cornell.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2CWE1zw9TO--wFuHOs0pwQ
Who Is a Muslim? (Fordham UP, 2021) argues that modern Urdu literature, from its inception in colonial institutions such as Fort William College, Calcutta, to its dominant iterations in contemporary Pakistan—popular novels, short stories, television serials—is formed around a question that is and historically has been at the core of early modern and modern Western literatures. The question “Who is a Muslim?,” a constant concern within eighteenth-century literary and scholarly orientalist texts, the English oriental tale chief among them, takes on new and dangerous meanings once it travels to the North-Indian colony, and later to the newly formed Pakistan. A literary-historical study spanning some three centuries, this book argues that the idea of an Urdu canon, far from secular or progressive, has been shaped as the authority designate around the intertwined questions of piety, national identity, and citizenship.

Maryam Wasif Khan is Associate Professor of Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies at Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS). She received her doctoral degree in Comparative Literature from the University of California, Los Angeles under the supervision of Professor Aamir Mufti. She also holds an A.B. in Comparative Literature from Princeton University. Her work on British orientalism, Muslim reform and nineteenth-century prose fiction in Urdu has appeared in Modern Fiction Studies (MFS), Modern Language Quarterly: A Journal of Literary History (MLQ) and PMLA. Her book, Who is a Muslim? Orientalism and Vernacular Populisms, (Fordham University Press: 2020) argues against conventional methods of writing literary history for colonial vernaculars such as Urdu or Hindi. Suggesting that Urdu prose fiction from the moment of its inception at Fort William College is coded with certain Orientalist ideals of Muslim identity, the project demonstrates how this identity, in the contemporary moment, manifests as a powerful religio-populist literary impulse.

Friday, April 30, 2021 at 4:30pmShelley Haley: Cleopatra: From African Queen to Shifting IconShelley Haley (The Edward N...
04/29/2021

Friday, April 30, 2021 at 4:30pm
Shelley Haley: Cleopatra: From African Queen to Shifting Icon
Shelley Haley (The Edward North Professor of Classics at Hamilton College) will give a virtual talk entitled, "Cleopatra: From African Queen to Shifting Icon" on April 30, 2021 at 4:30 PM. A link to the event on Zoom will be made available upon request to Linda
https://events.cornell.edu/event/shelley_haley_cleopatra_from_african_queen_to_shifting_icon

Friday, April 30, 2021 at 4:30pm
Shelley Haley: Cleopatra: From African Queen to Shifting Icon
Shelley Haley (The Edward North Professor of Classics at Hamilton College) will give a virtual talk entitled, "Cleopatra: From African Queen to Shifting Icon" on April 30, 2021 at 4:30 PM. A link to the event on Zoom will be made available upon request to Linda
https://events.cornell.edu/event/shelley_haley_cleopatra_from_african_queen_to_shifting_icon

TODAY! 5PMInteractivities I: difference and digital textualityhttps://events.cornell.edu/event/interactivities_i_differe...
04/28/2021
Interactivities I: difference and digital textuality

TODAY! 5PM
Interactivities I: difference and digital textuality
https://events.cornell.edu/event/interactivities_i_difference_and_digital_textuality

CNY Humanities Corridor & Society for the Humanities present the Annual Digital Humanities Lecture delivered by Marisa Parham Interactivities I: difference and digital textuality Dr. Parham will discuss what might be made possible at the intersection between Black expressive traditions, digital huma...

Postponed!Institute for African Development Global Africa Webinar Series: BLACK LIVES MATTER ET PROGRÈS SOCIAL: L’INDISP...
04/28/2021

Postponed!
Institute for African Development Global Africa Webinar Series: BLACK LIVES MATTER ET PROGRÈS SOCIAL: L’INDISPENSABLE CONVERGENCE DES LUTTES EN AFRIQUE, AUX USA ET DANS LA DIASPORA GLOBALE

Postponed!
Institute for African Development Global Africa Webinar Series: BLACK LIVES MATTER ET PROGRÈS SOCIAL: L’INDISPENSABLE CONVERGENCE DES LUTTES EN AFRIQUE, AUX USA ET DANS LA DIASPORA GLOBALE

TODAY!Pan-African Connections: Edited Collection DiscussionMonday, April 26, 2021 at 4:00pm to 6:00pmhttps://events.corn...
04/23/2021
Pan-African Connections: Edited Collection Discussion

TODAY!
Pan-African Connections: Edited Collection Discussion
Monday, April 26, 2021 at 4:00pm to 6:00pm
https://events.cornell.edu/event/pan-african_connections_book_discussion

Please join professors Carole Boyce Davies and N‘Dri Thérèse Assié-Lumumba for a discussion of the edited collection: Pan-African Connections. Pan-African Connections is an edited volume inspired by the intellectual life of Prof. Locksley Edmondson, spanning decades of lived experience in Pan-A...

TODAY! Friday, April 16th- Bridging Community Knowledge and Scholarship: Dr. Carole Boyce Davies on the Genesis of the E...
04/14/2021

TODAY! Friday, April 16th- Bridging Community Knowledge and Scholarship: Dr. Carole Boyce Davies on the Genesis of the Eric Williams Memorial Lecture, moderated by Dr. Jennifer Wilks;

Join the Warfield Center for a warm welcome celebrating the digital launch of the Eric Williams Memorial Lecture. This series features four conversations with previous lecturers of the series, Erica Williams-Connell, Dr. Arnold Rampersad, Dr. Carole Boyce Daives, Sir Hilary Beckles, and Dr. Hollis "Chalkdust" Liverpool. Each Friday a new conversation will be released to watch on YouTube, reflecting on the life, legacy and global impact of Eric Williams's work
https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/caaas/events/bridging-community-knowledge-and-scholarship-dr-carole-boyce-davies-on-the-genesis-of-the-eric-williams-memorial-lecture-moderated-by-dr-jennifer-wilks

TODAY! Friday, April 16th- Bridging Community Knowledge and Scholarship: Dr. Carole Boyce Davies on the Genesis of the Eric Williams Memorial Lecture, moderated by Dr. Jennifer Wilks;

Join the Warfield Center for a warm welcome celebrating the digital launch of the Eric Williams Memorial Lecture. This series features four conversations with previous lecturers of the series, Erica Williams-Connell, Dr. Arnold Rampersad, Dr. Carole Boyce Daives, Sir Hilary Beckles, and Dr. Hollis "Chalkdust" Liverpool. Each Friday a new conversation will be released to watch on YouTube, reflecting on the life, legacy and global impact of Eric Williams's work
https://liberalarts.utexas.edu/caaas/events/bridging-community-knowledge-and-scholarship-dr-carole-boyce-davies-on-the-genesis-of-the-eric-williams-memorial-lecture-moderated-by-dr-jennifer-wilks

Address

310 Triphammer Road
Ithaca, NY
14850

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 17:00
Thursday 09:00 - 17:00
Friday 09:00 - 17:00

Telephone

(607) 255-4625

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