Salisbury University Libraries

Salisbury University Libraries As the main academic hub on campus, Salisbury University Libraries provide you with the tools you need to succeed in all your academic endeavors.

SU Libraries support each student- freshman through graduate, on-site & distant- and every academic program.

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Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
10/12/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

On Indigenous Peoples’ Day, we recognize all of the Native American people who have lived on Delmarva, past and present. Our region has a rich indigenous history that we urge our followers to explore in our collections, especially Helen Rountree’s 1997 book “Eastern Shore Indians of Virginia and Maryland.” One story about the native Wicomico people continues to surprise people in City of Salisbury, Maryland—much of the Camden area, including the area where Salisbury University and the Nabb Center is located, was a Wicomico village/colonial-era reservation called Tondotank. The Algonquin-speaking Wighcocomoco people and their chief lived in this village when the English began to settle and the land was recognized as an “Indian-occupied” reservation by the colonial government in 1678 (rough boundaries shown on the map). Across the river, there was another smaller Wicomico village adjacent to Rokiawakin (Cottingham’s) Creek (today named Rockawalkin). According to the Lord Proprietor’s orders, the English were prohibited from settling within a three-mile-wide buffer zone around the Native American villages. However, he failed to survey the “reservations” (except for Chicone on the Nanticoke River) which left the boundaries loosely defined. Furthermore, the colonial government barred the tribes from contact with other indigenous communities, thus isolating them from potential allies. By the 1760s, the Wicomico people migrated from the region, primarily relocating to New York.

Maryland is known for our terrapins, but did you know that the Nanticoke’s symbol is also a turtle? In Native American s...
10/12/2020

Maryland is known for our terrapins, but did you know that the Nanticoke’s symbol is also a turtle? In Native American symbolism, the turtle represents Mother Earth. On this Indigenous Peoples day, we acknowledge the land of the Nanticoke where Salisbury University stands; and our neighbors on the land of the Assateague, the land of the Annemessex, the land of the Piscataway, the land of the Pocomoke, and the land of the Choptank. Find out which native land you live on via this link: https://native-land.ca/

Before Hispanic Heritage Month ends, check out some books available at the GAC. Here are four recommendations: 1) This B...
10/08/2020

Before Hispanic Heritage Month ends, check out some books available at the GAC. Here are four recommendations:
1) This Bridge Called My Back: Writings by Radical Women of Color
2) Curious unions : Mexican American workers and resistance in Oxnard, California, 1898-1961
3) Latin American Migrations to the Heartland
4) I am not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter

Thank you teachers!!!!!
10/05/2020

Thank you teachers!!!!!

On #WorldTeachersDay, we want to give a huge thank you to educators of the past, present, and future. Through pandemics, wars, segregation, and all other obstacles, teachers across Delmarva (and around the world) have worked to ensure our children receive the education they need to succeed in the world. For all their patience and passion, we say THANK YOU! These photos are unidentified class photos of one-room schools mostly in Wicomico County from the Reverend BG Parker photos on Flickr (https://flic.kr/s/aHsmL39PGV)

October is LGBT History month! 🏳️‍🌈
10/05/2020

October is LGBT History month! 🏳️‍🌈

Good Yontif to those in our SU community and beyond who fast today.
09/28/2020

Good Yontif to those in our SU community and beyond who fast today.

This particular #WalkaboutWednesday, we were somehow able to time our walk *just right* such that the morning light was ...
09/23/2020

This particular #WalkaboutWednesday, we were somehow able to time our walk *just right* such that the morning light was just perfect when we arrived at the pergola. ⁣

Salisbury University's campus is always amazingly beautiful -- but those of you who are lucky enough to have been here during the Fall season know that our campus truly glows during these cool & crisp months....... ⁣

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(& thanks to Dr. P in the English Department for providing the on-point accessories to the two statues!) 🤓 ⁣

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❤️@salisburyuniversityarboretum 🍁 #SalisburyUniversity 🧡 #WeLoveOurCampus 🍃@salisburyuniversity 🍂 #GoGulls 💛 #GullStrong 🍁@sualumni 🤎 #FlockToSu 🍃 #AllAreWelcomeHere 💚 @flocktosu ❤️ #FallOnCampus 🍂 #CampusLife 🧡 #LibrariesOfInstagram ⁣

SU Libraries wishes you a sweet and peaceful year. L’Shanah tovah.
09/21/2020

SU Libraries wishes you a sweet and peaceful year. L’Shanah tovah.

Rest In Peace, RBG.
09/19/2020

Rest In Peace, RBG.

Everything had a slightly odd glowing look to it during our *very* early morning #WalkaboutWednesday trip around and thr...
09/17/2020

Everything had a slightly odd glowing look to it during our *very* early morning #WalkaboutWednesday trip around and through campus today. Unsurprisingly, it made the Guerrieri Academic Commons look particularly lovely, lit up as it was from the inside - with all of the glass surfaces reflecting the colors and shadows around it. ⁣

We had only walked a bit further past the Academic Commons when we looked up and caught sight of the sun also glowing odd and bright in the sky. News reports this morning said that smoke from the California wildfires has already reached Washington D.C. and New York City, so it isn’t too unrealistic to think that the quality of this morning’s light and our view of the sun were both impacted by the fires rampaging thousands upon thousands of miles across the country, burning along a different coastline than our own nearby beloved Atlantic...⁣ 🌊⁣




#GuerreriAcademicCommons #SalisburyUniversity #CaliforniaFires #GullStrong #StayStrong #SULibraries #ThankYouFirefighters #2020 #BurningSun #SixThirtyAM

Today is the first day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2020. The theme this year is “Hispanics: Be proud of your pa...
09/15/2020

Today is the first day of National Hispanic Heritage Month, 2020. The theme this year is “Hispanics: Be proud of your past, embrace the future.”

On this rainy day, we were able to sneak into the Secret Garden to snap these pictures 💧between 💧raindrops!  We find tha...
09/09/2020

On this rainy day, we were able to sneak into the Secret Garden to snap these pictures 💧between 💧raindrops! We find that on our amazing campus, there is always beauty to be found... ⁣⁣
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p.s. and check out the video in today's stories!⁣
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#SalisburyUniversity #SecretGarden #WalkaboutWednesday #SULibraries #RainyDay #CampusLife #GullStrong #GullLife #WeLoveOurCampus #LibrariesOfInstagram #GoGulls @salisburyuniversity @salisburyuniversityarboretum

While we normally celebrate Labor Day with one last summer hurrah, 2020 finds us forging ahead with Fall semester. Pleas...
09/07/2020

While we normally celebrate Labor Day with one last summer hurrah, 2020 finds us forging ahead with Fall semester. Please take some time today to honor the workers this day celebrates, like this New York City Garment worker from the Local 23-25 contingent in the 1981 Labor Day Parade. Image from @laborarts, a collaboration between The Shelley and Donald Rubin Foundation, The Robert F. Wagner Labor Archives/ Tamiment Library at New York University, and Bread and Roses.

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
09/01/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

“I have heard her say she would wade through blood and tears for her freedom.”– In Maryland, September is now Underground Railroad Month. We’ll be taking some time to highlight stories from people who escaped from slavery on the Delmarva Peninsula. One of the greatest sources for these stories is William Still’s 1872 “Underground Railroad,” which we have in our collection and can also be found online (https://archive.org/details/undergroundrailr00stil). Still was known as the “Father of the Underground Railroad” and helped over 800 slaves escape to freedom (we’ll focus on William and his family in a later post). One page from his book includes an illustration captioned “TWENTY-EIGHT FUGITIVES ESCAPING FROM THE EASTERN SHORE OF MARYLAND.” Among the accounts of this party of 28—most of whom escaped from Cambridge—is a connection to one of our significant archival collections. – Nat Ambie was enslaved by John Muir, a wealthy farmer who owned 40-50 slaves. In 1857, Nat “armed himself with a good pistol and a big knife, and taking his wife with him, bade adieu forever to bondage.” On October 21, 1857 Nat and his wife, Lizzie, were listed in a runaway slave advertisement posted by Lizzie’s owner—Dr. Alexander Hamilton Bayly. Dr. A.H. Bayly is well-represented in our Bayly Family Papers and his medical ledger and letters can be found in our Internet Archive collection. Bayly’s views on slavery were complicated as he was a witness for many manumissions, gave free black people healthcare without charge, and was upset when his son joined the confederacy—yet he owned slaves and was willing to pay $300 for Lizzie’s return. – When asked if his wife would fight for freedom, Nat said “I have heard her say she would wade through blood and tears for her freedom.” In 1858, Nat sent a letter to William Still inquiring about his family in Baltimore from Auburn, New York where it appears he and Lizzie lived. Read more about Nat and the other escapees from Cambridge beginning on page 102 (we’ll be highlighting more people from this group in later posts). #ugrr #undergroundrailroad

08/31/2020
Welcome Back from SU’s President – Fall 2020

"We are all in this together!"

Today, Salisbury University marks the official start of fall classes! SU President Charles Wight offers this message to Sea Gulls everywhere, in support of t...

Welcome back students!! It's a different kind of first day of school today, but we wish you luck the same. Be Brilliant ...
08/31/2020

Welcome back students!! It's a different kind of first day of school today, but we wish you luck the same. Be Brilliant SU!

SCENE REPORT!!! SU Libraries is getting ready for the semester. Remember: if you are in the GAC, mask up!! 😷 Just like B...
08/28/2020

SCENE REPORT!!! SU Libraries is getting ready for the semester. Remember: if you are in the GAC, mask up!! 😷 Just like Beverly and Martha, who are sporting their #fdlp masks.

Welcome to campus! Whatever that means for you this fall, whether you are living on campus or off, taking classes virtua...
08/24/2020

Welcome to campus! Whatever that means for you this fall, whether you are living on campus or off, taking classes virtually or face to face, everyone at the Guerrieri Academic Commons is glad you are here. #SULibrarieswelcomesyou #SULibraries

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
08/14/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

Researching lynchings on Maryland’s lower Eastern Shore? In order to support ongoing task forces and research, we created a resource guide that compiles our sources and others that document racial terror lynchings in Somerset, Worcester, and Wicomico counties: https://libraryguides.salisbury.edu/lowereslynchings (link in Insta bio). We will continue to add to the guide—including pages for attempted lynchings, MANY newspaper clippings, and potentially branching outside of the lower Eastern Shore—and encourage others to send us their research or any related items. The guide is intended to facilitate public and academic research, remembrance, and reconciliation on these painful chapters in our regional and national history. Please take warning: the guide contains descriptions and images of graphic violence.

#SULibRiddle #vacationvibes📚Number 1: can you guess which country we’re visiting with these books? Hint is in the last f...
08/06/2020

#SULibRiddle #vacationvibes📚Number 1: can you guess which country we’re visiting with these books? Hint is in the last frame.

Get ready for the SU Library Riddle for August! This month, we'll be posting some favorite vacation destinations. Since ...
08/03/2020

Get ready for the SU Library Riddle for August! This month, we'll be posting some favorite vacation destinations. Since we can't visit them in person, check out our recommendations for traveling via the library. #SULibRiddle

the #SULibRiddle theme for July was: Summer! We've compiled some resources available at the library about Summer for you...
07/28/2020

the #SULibRiddle theme for July was: Summer! We've compiled some resources available at the library about Summer for you to enjoy. Find them right here:
https://libraryguides.salisbury.edu/monthlyriddle/July! And, stay tuned next week for a fun riddle for August #vacationallieverwanted

Challenge Accepted!!!
07/27/2020

Challenge Accepted!!!

This movie still is from A Day in the Country, which relates to the #SULibRiddle theme for July and is available through...
07/22/2020

This movie still is from A Day in the Country, which relates to the #SULibRiddle theme for July and is available through our Kanopy database.

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
07/21/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

Browsing the July 21, 1835 Somerset Village Herald (https://mdsoar.org/handle/11603/17010), we can see a lot of the daily activity from people in Salisbury, Princess Anne, and incoming news from further beyond, as well as noted Somerset merchant, Littleton Dennis Teackle. What really catches our eye and sparks our research imagination, though, are the snippets of stories from people who are less documented in the annals of history: Simpy Henry, an enslaved woman who was jailed after escaping from Baltimore; Daniel J. Foxwell, who ran away from G.W. Covington; Sandy, who ran away from James M. Cathell; and all of the unnamed enslaved peoples who were trafficked as a result of the advertisements of WM Roach of Little Annemessex, Overley and Sanders of Princess Anne, and Alexander S. Jones. Head over to our Historical Eastern Shore Newspapers collection to continue searching: https://mdsoar.org/handle/11603/4215

Salisbury University Libraries's cover photo
07/21/2020

Salisbury University Libraries's cover photo

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
07/18/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

We’re saddened by the loss of a true legend, John Lewis, who Salisbury University was fortunate to host for a lecture in 2004. These photos from the event show Lewis speaking with students and others as an honored guest of PACE at Salisbury University’s Sarbanes Lecture Series. Please join us in reflecting on Rep. Lewis’ life. Rest in Power.

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
07/16/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

While researching the free black people of Dorchester County listed in Dr. Alexander Hamilton Bayly’s medical ledger, we’ve made extensive use of the Maryland State Archives Legacy of Slavery in Maryland database. Anyone researching 19th century African American history will find this resource useful for both free and enslaved peoples. The database not only connects users to census records, but also certificates of freedom, manumissions, runaway advertisements, and more. In this image, our search for “James Trippe” shows us free black men (Junior and Senior) who owned—and manumitted—at least a dozen slaves in the first decade of the 1800s. Head here to explore more: http://slavery2.msa.maryland.gov/pages/Search.aspx

City of Salisbury, Maryland
07/09/2020

City of Salisbury, Maryland

Over the next week, the City of Salisbury's Lynching Memorial Task Force will be sharing posts on our account to educate the community on our City’s history.

The names and identities of many lynching victims are unknown and will probably never be known. Many lynchings were not well-documented and are difficult for historians to chronicle. An unknown man was lynched in Salisbury and found just days after Matthew Williams (the subject of yesterday’s profile) was murdered. Historians suspect he was killed by the same mob on his way home from the grocery store. For more information on Williams, the unknown victim, their deaths, and the legacy of lynching read Sherrilyn Ifill’s book “On the Courthouse Lawn” or review the Nabb Center at Salisbury University’s many resources.

With the help of the City and the Equal Justice Initiative, we look forward to memorializing men like this unknown victim and working toward a more equitable future. Learn more by swiping/clicking through the photos below. Get involved by joining our mailing list: https://forms.gle/25Rgn6ogN2fkxQJt8

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture
07/08/2020

Edward H. Nabb Research Center for Delmarva History & Culture

🚨New resources on Internet Archive🚨 Included are 20th century city and business directories, Salisbury Area Chamber of Commerce / Salisbury, MD city surveys, and a Pennsylvania Railroad booklet on farming possibilities of the Delaware, Maryland, and Virginia Peninsula from 1911. Head over to our Internet Archive collection (https://archive.org/details/salisburyuniversitylibrariesnabbresearchcenter?sort=-publicdate – link in Instagram bio) to find information about old businesses, experience local vintage advertisements, and learn more about City of Salisbury, Maryland and how it viewed itself. Just from the images above we can see the 1907 population with a race and gender stats (4393 white, 1262 African American, 5655 total) and several 1940 businesses from the Salisbury area including African American businesses. Tell us about the new discoveries you make digging into these!

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Hey guys! I created a survey on the university shuttle for my marketing class and would greatly appreciate it if you would take the time to complete the survey, it will not take long. Thank you!
http://www.salisbury.edu/news/article/2018-8-1-Anthropology-Student-Replicates-Iron-Age-Artifacts-With-3-D-Printing An interesting use of 3-D printers for scholarship, a resource of the SU Libraries, which is also in the Academic Commons.
Did you know, the Downtown Salisbury Trolley stops right in front of the SU Academic Commons Building Thursdays, Fridays, and Saturdays and will take you to all of your favorite Downtown Salisbury hotspots FOR FREE!? Check out www.DowntownSBYTrolley.com for information!