Stanford Biodesign

Stanford Biodesign Educating and empowering health technology innovators and leading the transition to a value-driven innovation ecosystem. https://twitter.com/subiodesign
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In 2001, we founded Stanford Biodesign to create an ecosystem of training and support for Stanford University students, fellows, and faculty with the talent and ambition to become health technology innovators. Our goal was (and continues to be) looking beyond research and discovery to provide the knowledge, skills, mentoring, and networking required to deliver meaningful and valuable innovations to patients everywhere. Today, the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign is widely regarded as one of the most successful partnerships between academia and the health technology industry anywhere. Stanford Bio-X provides the ideal setting for our interdisciplinary program, with its intersecting laboratories and connections across the schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Business. And Stanford University’s location in Silicon Valley gives us unprecedented access to world-class mentors and coaches who share their insights and expertise with our fellows, students, and faculty trainees to help them more effectively and efficiently address critical healthcare needs. We’re proud of the extraordinary impact our alumni are having in improving the lives of millions of patients around the world. And we continue to advance our programs and approach to help them keep pace with the rapidly changing health innovation ecosystem. Our thriving Stanford Biodesign community isn’t just responding to an evolving industry, we’re helping to define it.

In 2001, we founded Stanford Biodesign to create an ecosystem of training and support for Stanford University students, fellows, and faculty with the talent and ambition to become health technology innovators. Our goal was (and continues to be) looking beyond research and discovery to provide the knowledge, skills, mentoring, and networking required to deliver meaningful and valuable innovations to patients everywhere. Today, the Stanford Byers Center for Biodesign is widely regarded as one of the most successful partnerships between academia and the health technology industry anywhere. Stanford Bio-X provides the ideal setting for our interdisciplinary program, with its intersecting laboratories and connections across the schools of Medicine, Engineering, and Business. And Stanford University’s location in Silicon Valley gives us unprecedented access to world-class mentors and coaches who share their insights and expertise with our fellows, students, and faculty trainees to help them more effectively and efficiently address critical healthcare needs. We’re proud of the extraordinary impact our alumni are having in improving the lives of millions of patients around the world. And we continue to advance our programs and approach to help them keep pace with the rapidly changing health innovation ecosystem. Our thriving Stanford Biodesign community isn’t just responding to an evolving industry, we’re helping to define it.

Operating as usual

Meet our graduating Innovation Fellows: Keith Hansen, MDQ. What is the most fulfilling thing about your work?A. Making a...
06/03/2021

Meet our graduating Innovation Fellows: Keith Hansen, MD

Q. What is the most fulfilling thing about your work?
A. Making a visible difference in patients’ lives in an immediate way. It’s why I want to become a transplant surgeon; you can have a patient whose liver is failing, and then three days after surgery, they’re out on the floor and the jaundiced yellow color of their skin has gone away and every day their labs get better.

Q. What frustrates you the most?
A. Inefficiencies. For example, it makes me crazy that in the 21st century, I have to sit down and write out patient labs on a sheet of paper in order to figure things out. And in the OR, there are frequently delays due to poor planning and poor optimization of workflow. The good side is recognizing these problems as needs that can be addressed through innovation.

Q. What about the Biodesign program has surprised you?
A. That it's not about solutions. I have this whiteboard at home where I list problems I see on rounds or in the OR. But I always framed them as solutions – like a long-acting immunosuppression drug for transplant patients, or a specific tool that would be helpful in the OR. But after the very first month at Biodesign, I learned that it’s not about jumping to a solution, it’s about taking the time to really understand the problem.

Q. What do you want to do after the fellowship?
A. My team is pretty excited about taking one of our projects forward, so I’m interested in staying involved. After conversations with James Wall, Dan Azagury, and Geoff Gurtner, I realize that it’s possible to be an academic surgeon and an innovator. I wouldn’t have known that there’s a way to do both without their guidance.

Q. Do you have a role model?
A. I have several! Dr. Hobart Harris, the chief of general surgery at UCSF Health is a big inspiration to me. He’s a phenomenal surgeon, a man of integrity, and a great innovator. And James Wall at Biodesign is a model of what I want to do and who I want to be. And Nancy Ascher, a transplant surgeon who is the chair of surgery and the head of transplant at UCSF – she is a huge inspiration.

Q. What is one decision you made that changed your life?
A. Pursuing surgery and a surgical residency at UCSF changed how I approach patients and life in general. It inspired me to create this list of tenets, which are kind of modeled on Halstead’s surgical tenets. It includes principles like the everlasting pursuit of excellence, and that the way to do a surgery perfectly is not to rush through it and move your hands quickly, but to do the right things at the right time in the right order. And I’ve been kind of translating that to my life in general.

Q. Do you have any advice for others interested in medicine and innovation?
A. I think it’s important to understand your strengths, and use them to guide your decisions – both with regard to career choices and the opportunities you pursue. And if you think Biodesign is cool or sounds interesting, apply! It’s been an amazing program.

Meet our graduating Innovation Fellows: Keith Hansen, MD

Q. What is the most fulfilling thing about your work?
A. Making a visible difference in patients’ lives in an immediate way. It’s why I want to become a transplant surgeon; you can have a patient whose liver is failing, and then three days after surgery, they’re out on the floor and the jaundiced yellow color of their skin has gone away and every day their labs get better.

Q. What frustrates you the most?
A. Inefficiencies. For example, it makes me crazy that in the 21st century, I have to sit down and write out patient labs on a sheet of paper in order to figure things out. And in the OR, there are frequently delays due to poor planning and poor optimization of workflow. The good side is recognizing these problems as needs that can be addressed through innovation.

Q. What about the Biodesign program has surprised you?
A. That it's not about solutions. I have this whiteboard at home where I list problems I see on rounds or in the OR. But I always framed them as solutions – like a long-acting immunosuppression drug for transplant patients, or a specific tool that would be helpful in the OR. But after the very first month at Biodesign, I learned that it’s not about jumping to a solution, it’s about taking the time to really understand the problem.

Q. What do you want to do after the fellowship?
A. My team is pretty excited about taking one of our projects forward, so I’m interested in staying involved. After conversations with James Wall, Dan Azagury, and Geoff Gurtner, I realize that it’s possible to be an academic surgeon and an innovator. I wouldn’t have known that there’s a way to do both without their guidance.

Q. Do you have a role model?
A. I have several! Dr. Hobart Harris, the chief of general surgery at UCSF Health is a big inspiration to me. He’s a phenomenal surgeon, a man of integrity, and a great innovator. And James Wall at Biodesign is a model of what I want to do and who I want to be. And Nancy Ascher, a transplant surgeon who is the chair of surgery and the head of transplant at UCSF – she is a huge inspiration.

Q. What is one decision you made that changed your life?
A. Pursuing surgery and a surgical residency at UCSF changed how I approach patients and life in general. It inspired me to create this list of tenets, which are kind of modeled on Halstead’s surgical tenets. It includes principles like the everlasting pursuit of excellence, and that the way to do a surgery perfectly is not to rush through it and move your hands quickly, but to do the right things at the right time in the right order. And I’ve been kind of translating that to my life in general.

Q. Do you have any advice for others interested in medicine and innovation?
A. I think it’s important to understand your strengths, and use them to guide your decisions – both with regard to career choices and the opportunities you pursue. And if you think Biodesign is cool or sounds interesting, apply! It’s been an amazing program.

Way to go! Biodesign-originated Zenflow, which is developing a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperpl...
06/02/2021

Way to go! Biodesign-originated Zenflow, which is developing a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, has closed a $24M financing and appointed Susan Stimson, most recently of KCK Group, as president. The financing will support the pivotal trial of its Spring® System. Zenflow was co-founded by Nick Damiano and Shreya Mehta out of the 2013-14 Stanford Biodesign Innovation Fellowship. Learn more at this link: https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2021/06/02/2240502/0/en/Zenflow-Announces-24-Million-Financing-Round-Appoints-Susan-Stimson-as-President.html

Way to go! Biodesign-originated Zenflow, which is developing a minimally invasive treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia, has closed a $24M financing and appointed Susan Stimson, most recently of KCK Group, as president. The financing will support the pivotal trial of its Spring® System. Zenflow was co-founded by Nick Damiano and Shreya Mehta out of the 2013-14 Stanford Biodesign Innovation Fellowship. Learn more at this link: https://www.globenewswire.com/news-release/2021/06/02/2240502/0/en/Zenflow-Announces-24-Million-Financing-Round-Appoints-Susan-Stimson-as-President.html

Welcome! Meghan Stawitcke has joined Stanford Biodesign as Fellowships Manager. She was previously an educational progra...
06/01/2021

Welcome! Meghan Stawitcke has joined Stanford Biodesign as Fellowships Manager. She was previously an educational program manager at Stanford Medicine, department of Pediatrics, where she administered three distinct fellowship programs. Meghan holds a bachelor's degree in American literature and culture from UCLA. We are so glad you are here!

Welcome! Meghan Stawitcke has joined Stanford Biodesign as Fellowships Manager. She was previously an educational program manager at Stanford Medicine, department of Pediatrics, where she administered three distinct fellowship programs. Meghan holds a bachelor's degree in American literature and culture from UCLA. We are so glad you are here!

Stacie was most recently the chief of staff at Rad AI, driving company operations and development of state-of-the-art AI...
05/31/2021

Stacie was most recently the chief of staff at Rad AI, driving company operations and development of state-of-the-art AI for radiology. She holds a master's in biomedical engineering from Duke Engineering and has helped develop several medical devices including an intercranial sensor-embedded catheter for traumatic brain injury and an oxygen regulator for neonatal wards in Uganda.

Want to invent your own future in health technology innovation? Learn more and apply now for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship at http://bit.ly/BiodesignFellow.

Stacie was most recently the chief of staff at Rad AI, driving company operations and development of state-of-the-art AI for radiology. She holds a master's in biomedical engineering from Duke Engineering and has helped develop several medical devices including an intercranial sensor-embedded catheter for traumatic brain injury and an oxygen regulator for neonatal wards in Uganda.

Want to invent your own future in health technology innovation? Learn more and apply now for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship at http://bit.ly/BiodesignFellow.

Congratulations Oliver! In addition to his many other accomplishments, Oliver Aalami is the director of Biodesign for Di...
05/31/2021

Congratulations Oliver! In addition to his many other accomplishments, Oliver Aalami is the director of Biodesign for Digital Health.

Congratulations to Vascular Surgeon Dr. Oliver Aalami, who has been promoted to the rank of Clinical Professor!!! 👏👏👏

"Well-deserved recognition for your leadership and accomplishments in Stanford's Division of Vascular Surgery, at SU Biodesign, and in the Society for Vascular Surgery," wrote Division Chief Dr. Ronald Dalman.

Buckle up and get ready to ride with Josh Makower, incoming director of Stanford Biodesign, in DeviceTalks (Josh starts ...
05/29/2021
Makower making medtech innovation bigger, stronger; Medtronic’s Ha speaking up or AAPI colleagues - DeviceTalks

Buckle up and get ready to ride with Josh Makower, incoming director of Stanford Biodesign, in DeviceTalks (Josh starts at 28:23). Excerpts:
-"If you stay focused on the need and the customer you will find your way to the next big innovative idea."
- "Reimbursement needs to be solved to improve patient access and enhance innovation. The whole process - from coding and coverage to payment - is rigid, difficult, and opaque."
- "One new direction for Stanford Biodesign - a focus on developing data-driven guidelines and insights for policymakers to understand how the policies we have impact healthcare innovation."

This week we’ll explore innovation and social equity. First, we’ll hear a portion of an interview with Martha Ha, chief privacy officer and chief counsel of corporate governance, and Jon de Csepel, CMO, vice president, medical affairs of the Americas. The pair will explain how the company is rea...

Congratulations! Singapore Biodesign has been awarded affiliate status - a special designation that has been earned by o...
05/28/2021
Singapore Biodesign: Eleven Years of Growth Culminates in Prestigious Affiliate Status

Congratulations! Singapore Biodesign has been awarded affiliate status - a special designation that has been earned by only one other program in Stanford Biodesign's 20 year history. #global #healthtechnology #training

Over 11 years, Singapore Biodesign has grown from a single class of fellows to a robust capability initiative that has met the rigorous criteria needed to be awarded affiliate status.

Xixi Zhao is an adult and pediatric nephrology fellow at Stanford Health Care. She completed her residency in internal m...
05/27/2021

Xixi Zhao is an adult and pediatric nephrology fellow at Stanford Health Care. She completed her residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at Rush University, where she led research projects and initiatives to combat kidney disease, influenza vaccine hesitancy, and healthcare disparities in Chicago's South Side, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. More recently she has been working with multiple collaborators to bring artificial intelligence to nephrology.

Want to invent your own career in health technology innovation? Apply for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship before August 14! Learn more at bit.ly/BiodesignFellow

Xixi Zhao is an adult and pediatric nephrology fellow at Stanford Health Care. She completed her residency in internal medicine and pediatrics at Rush University, where she led research projects and initiatives to combat kidney disease, influenza vaccine hesitancy, and healthcare disparities in Chicago's South Side, Haiti, and the Dominican Republic. More recently she has been working with multiple collaborators to bring artificial intelligence to nephrology.

Want to invent your own career in health technology innovation? Apply for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship before August 14! Learn more at bit.ly/BiodesignFellow

Fogarty Innovation kicked off their brand new Medtech Trailblazers video series with Ginger Graham, a born leader who ha...
05/27/2021
A Born Leader: A conversation with Ginger Graham, Part 1.

Fogarty Innovation kicked off their brand new Medtech Trailblazers video series with Ginger Graham, a born leader who has run Fortune 500 and Nasdaq 100 businesses. Her remarkable career has touched the lives of countless patients and inspired untold employees. Watch the first episode:

From Miss Rodeo Arkansas queen to running Fortune 500 and Nasdaq 100 businesses, Ginger Graham has had a remarkable career, touching the lives of countless p...

Congratulations to longtime Biodesign contributor Gabriel Sanchez whose company, Enspectra Health, has been awarded a $4...
05/26/2021
Enspectra Health Receives $4.0 Million NIH Grant to Advance a New Field of Virtual Biopsies

Congratulations to longtime Biodesign contributor Gabriel Sanchez whose company, Enspectra Health, has been awarded a $4M NIH/NCI grant to move pathology away from a dependence on glass slides and biopsies. The Fogarty Innovation company-in-residence is developing a device to help dermatologists evaluate skin conditions non-invasively to minimize unnecessary biopsies and diagnose disease earlier. #healthtech #innovation #training

/PRNewswire/ -- Enspectra Health, a digital health company dedicated to pioneering the field of virtual biopsies, announced today that it has received a Phase...

"As for the innovation process we teach, 100% of responding students indicated that it was useful in their careers... " ...
05/25/2021
Biomedical Technology Innovation Education and Its Effect on Graduate Student Careers Over 17 Years

"As for the innovation process we teach, 100% of responding students indicated that it was useful in their careers... " Learn about the long-term impact of Stanford Biodesign's graduate biomedical technology innovation course, and future directions that will further increase the relevance of its practice-oriented, interdisciplinary training in this article by Lyn Thayer Denend, Shiqin Xu, Paul Yock, and Ross Venook.

In the 1990s, interest in biomedical technologies blossomed among students across disciplines. In parallel, there was a push in academia to develop courses enabling interdisciplinary problem solving and more holistic, practice-oriented education. In response, Stanford Biodesign created a graduate co...

Whether you're pitching to investors or presenting to your peers, we all struggle with nerves sometimes. Here's two prov...
05/24/2021
Hacking Your Speaking Anxiety: How Lessons from Neuroscience Can Help You Communicate Confidently

Whether you're pitching to investors or presenting to your peers, we all struggle with nerves sometimes. Here's two proven, simple techniques you can use to reduce your stress in real time.

Career & Success Hacking Your Speaking Anxiety: How Lessons from Neuroscience Can Help You Communicate Confidently In this podcast episode, we discuss actions you can take to reduce speaking anxiety and achieve your communication goals. May 14, 2021 | by Matt Abrahams Andrew Huberman “There’s no...

Shortly after graduating with a BS in mechanical engineering from Stanford School of Engineering, Mateo joined a team at...
05/23/2021

Shortly after graduating with a BS in mechanical engineering from Stanford School of Engineering, Mateo joined a team at Verb Surgical where he helped design their surgical robot, for which he has several patents pending. After the company was acquired by Johnson & Johnson and merged with Auris Health, he stayed on and continued to work on developing minimally-invasive robotic surgical solutions and instrumentation.
Want to invent your own future in health technology? Apply for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship by August 14!

Shortly after graduating with a BS in mechanical engineering from Stanford School of Engineering, Mateo joined a team at Verb Surgical where he helped design their surgical robot, for which he has several patents pending. After the company was acquired by Johnson & Johnson and merged with Auris Health, he stayed on and continued to work on developing minimally-invasive robotic surgical solutions and instrumentation.
Want to invent your own future in health technology? Apply for the 2022-23 Biodesign Innovation Fellowship by August 14!

Raising capital is essential to healthtech innovation. Thank you Josh Makower, NEA - New Enterprise Associates; Allan Ma...
05/23/2021

Raising capital is essential to healthtech innovation. Thank you Josh Makower, NEA - New Enterprise Associates; Allan May, SV Health Investors; Asha Nayak, Johnson & Johnson Innovation; and Karen Long, KCK Medtech for providing our Innovation Course students with a fantastic foundational overview and a range of important perspectives.

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318 Campus Drive, Rm E100
Stanford, CA
94305-5428

General information

Our programs include Fellowships, Stanford Courses, Executive Education, Global Initiatives and Grants.The Biodesign Innovation Fellowship is a nearly year-long, full time program designed for individuals from anywhere in the world who are passionate abut improving health through technology innovation. For more information, visit our homepage at biodesign.stanford.edu.

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Monday 08:00 - 17:00
Tuesday 08:00 - 17:00
Wednesday 08:00 - 17:00
Thursday 08:00 - 17:00
Friday 08:00 - 17:00

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(650) 736-1160

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