Stanford University Department of Art & Art History

Stanford University Department of Art & Art History Welcome to the official page of the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University. This is the official page of the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University.

Our department in the School of Humanities and Sciences comprises 22 distinguished faculty and 14 professional staff members who serve approximately 70 graduate students and 110 undergraduate majors and minors each year. We host over 80 events annually, including the Art History Lecture Series, Studio Lecture Series, special lectures and symposia, gallery exhibitions and receptions, film screenings, and design presentations. Check out our current and upcoming events! All events are free and open to the public (unless otherwise noted). Details are subject to change without notice. For complete information about the department, go to http://art.stanford.edu.

Operating as usual

“Yareth” by Lorena Diosdado is one of the works featured in House of Mirrors, the 2021 Senior Exhibition. In her own wor...
05/27/2021

“Yareth” by Lorena Diosdado is one of the works featured in House of Mirrors, the 2021 Senior Exhibition. In her own words:

The photograph the painting is based on was taken during a hot summer in Texas from Yareth’s (my niece) beckoning. She adorned herself with her dad’s (in the background) accessories and posed like him, a man.

Yareth’s baby portrait hangs right above her telling a different story, one where the massive flower headband on her head seems to scream “GIRL.” Subtle (and not so subtle) messaging about the gender binary is happening all of the time, so this painting is a snapshot that explores and enhances those peculiarities.

Join us for the online opening of the 2021 Senior Exhibition on Friday, May 28 at 3 pm; register here: https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpdOutrTMqGNFxs_mhFZ8KDXQ16PmGAaq0

@lorenadiosd. Yareth. Oil on Canvas. 30” x 40” x 1-3/8''.

“Yareth” by Lorena Diosdado is one of the works featured in House of Mirrors, the 2021 Senior Exhibition. In her own words:

The photograph the painting is based on was taken during a hot summer in Texas from Yareth’s (my niece) beckoning. She adorned herself with her dad’s (in the background) accessories and posed like him, a man.

Yareth’s baby portrait hangs right above her telling a different story, one where the massive flower headband on her head seems to scream “GIRL.” Subtle (and not so subtle) messaging about the gender binary is happening all of the time, so this painting is a snapshot that explores and enhances those peculiarities.

Join us for the online opening of the 2021 Senior Exhibition on Friday, May 28 at 3 pm; register here: https://stanford.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIpdOutrTMqGNFxs_mhFZ8KDXQ16PmGAaq0

@lorenadiosd. Yareth. Oil on Canvas. 30” x 40” x 1-3/8''.

Details of “Homesick for Another World” by Krystal Ramirez, made of plastic, acrylic paint, wooden dowels, and monofilam...
05/24/2021

Details of “Homesick for Another World” by Krystal Ramirez, made of plastic, acrylic paint, wooden dowels, and monofilament. She writes:

Taking the title from the book of essays by the same name, “Homesick for Another World” brings attention to how the grotesque and the outrageous are infused with tenderness and beauty. This newest work honors the journey of surplus material that would otherwise end up in a landfill, from fossil fuel to petroleum to plastic to a towering abstract form requiring full attention to the life cycles and labor contained within everything.

See this work and more at Make Yourself at Home: First-year MFA Exhibition, now on view at the Stanford Art Gallery, for just one more week!

Stanford affiliates may schedule a time to visit the gallery, and the show is also available to view online; learn more at artexhibitions.stanford.edu/make-yourself-home, link in bio.

Photos by Krystal Ramirez

@krystalrmrz @stanfordartpractice

A sneak peek of Make Yourself at Home, the first-year MFA exhibition at the Stanford Art Gallery. This group show featur...
05/17/2021

A sneak peek of Make Yourself at Home, the first-year MFA exhibition at the Stanford Art Gallery. This group show features works by Andrew Catanese, Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, Krystal Ramirez, and Oleg Savunov.

Stanford affiliates may reserve a time to view the exhibition in person; all are invited to join us for the online opening on Tuesday, May 18 at 4:30 pm PT.

Learn more and register: https://events.stanford.edu/events/914/91400/

@stanfordartpractice
@andrewcatanese
@ti.michi
@unitedstatesofsouthafrica
@krystalrmrz
@somthing_happened

Departure, a four-channel video installation by Oleg Savunov, is one of the works featured in Make Yourself at Home, the...
05/10/2021

Departure, a four-channel video installation by Oleg Savunov, is one of the works featured in Make Yourself at Home, the upcoming first-year MFA exhibition.

Installed in the Stanford Art Gallery, this group show also features works by Andrew Catanese, Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, and Krystal Ramirez.

Make Yourself at Home will be available to view online on Friday, May 14. Stanford affiliates may register to view the exhibition in person by scheduling a visit. Reservations are limited and first come, first served.

Learn more about visiting the Stanford Art Gallery, and register for the online opening on Friday, May 14 at 11 am PT; link in bio.

@somthing_happened @stanfordartpractice

Cyle Metzger, PhD candidate in art history, will soon defend his dissertation, “Deep Cuts: Transgender History in US-Ame...
05/06/2021

Cyle Metzger, PhD candidate in art history, will soon defend his dissertation, “Deep Cuts: Transgender History in US-American Art after World War II.” In his own words:

During World War II, Nazi occupation forced the centers of modern art and transsexual medicine to move from Europe to the United States; this dissertation explores the legacy of this convergence in modern and contemporary American art and supports the continued growth of transgender art history as a distinct subfield.

This exploration shows that works by and featuring Forrest Bess (1911-1974), Candy Darling (1944-1974), Greer Lankton (1958-1996), and Cassils (b. 1971) do at least three things:

how social and scientific histories have shaped the ways in which gender transformation has appeared (or disappeared) in art history from WWII to the present moment;

why works of art in particular are central to constructing a visually and materially rich transgender history;

and the strengths and limitations that painting, photography, and sculpture each have in addressing transgender embodiment.

Thank you to @cylemetzger for sharing, and congratulations!

Images:
Forrest Bess, The Hermaphrodite, 1957. Oil on canvas, 8”x 11”, @menilcollection
Peter Hujar, Candy Darling on Her Deathbed, 1973. Gelatin silver print, 14.75” x 14.75”, @themuseumofmodernart
Greer Lankton, Sissy and Cherry on the Steps at Einstein’s, 1988. @greer_lankton_archives_museum (Paul Monroe). Instagram, posted July 22, 2020
Cassils, Cuts: A Traditional Sculpture, 2011. Timelapse (front). Courtesy of the artist.

#stanfordaahphd

“Broken Ritual and Scorched Earth” by Andrew Catanese, one of the works featured in Make Yourself at Home, the upcoming ...
05/04/2021

“Broken Ritual and Scorched Earth” by Andrew Catanese, one of the works featured in Make Yourself at Home, the upcoming first-year MFA exhibition.

Installed in the Stanford Art Gallery, this group show also features works by Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, Krystal Ramirez, and Oleg Savunov.

Make Yourself at Home will be available to view online on Friday, May 14; in-person visits to the gallery will be open to Stanford affiliates on a limited, reservation basis. Details to come!

Broken Ritual and Scorched Earth. Acrylic on panel. 48”H x 65.5”W. 2020.

@andrewcatanese @stanfordartpractice

“Broken Ritual and Scorched Earth” by Andrew Catanese, one of the works featured in Make Yourself at Home, the upcoming first-year MFA exhibition.

Installed in the Stanford Art Gallery, this group show also features works by Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, Krystal Ramirez, and Oleg Savunov.

Make Yourself at Home will be available to view online on Friday, May 14; in-person visits to the gallery will be open to Stanford affiliates on a limited, reservation basis. Details to come!

Broken Ritual and Scorched Earth. Acrylic on panel. 48”H x 65.5”W. 2020.

@andrewcatanese @stanfordartpractice

Emanuele Lugli, assistant professor of late medieval and early modern art, offers a reflection on Paolo Uccello’s Saint ...
05/03/2021

Emanuele Lugli, assistant professor of late medieval and early modern art, offers a reflection on Paolo Uccello’s Saint George and the Dragon, which was recently presented in an afternoon talk organized by Stanford’s Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Professor Lugli writes:

The dragon of Paolo Uccello’s Saint George in London’s National Gallery has often been overlooked. So, too, is what the dragon summoned to Uccello’s fifteenth-century Florentine patrons, that is pollution.

Uccello's painting participated in sociopolitical discourses on farming at a time of agricultural stagnancy. By moving away from theological interpretations, we rediscover this painting as pivoted in environmental and meteorological, that is local, concerns.

By focusing exclusively on local evidence, we contribute to displacing fifteenth-century art from its traditional Italo-centric focus, for what is universal about a painting that responds to site-specific knowledge?

Image: Paolo Uccello, Saint George and the Dragon, c. 1430s-70s, @nationalgallery

Emanuele Lugli, assistant professor of late medieval and early modern art, offers a reflection on Paolo Uccello’s Saint George and the Dragon, which was recently presented in an afternoon talk organized by Stanford’s Center for Medieval and Early Modern Studies. Professor Lugli writes:

The dragon of Paolo Uccello’s Saint George in London’s National Gallery has often been overlooked. So, too, is what the dragon summoned to Uccello’s fifteenth-century Florentine patrons, that is pollution.

Uccello's painting participated in sociopolitical discourses on farming at a time of agricultural stagnancy. By moving away from theological interpretations, we rediscover this painting as pivoted in environmental and meteorological, that is local, concerns.

By focusing exclusively on local evidence, we contribute to displacing fifteenth-century art from its traditional Italo-centric focus, for what is universal about a painting that responds to site-specific knowledge?

Image: Paolo Uccello, Saint George and the Dragon, c. 1430s-70s, @nationalgallery

Opening soon: Make Yourself at Home, the annual first-year MFA exhibition, featuring the works of Andrew Catanese, Tina ...
04/27/2021

Opening soon: Make Yourself at Home, the annual first-year MFA exhibition, featuring the works of Andrew Catanese, Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, Krystal Ramirez, and Oleg Savunov.

Stay tuned!

@andrewcatanese
@ti.michi
@unitedstatesofsouthafrica
@krystalrmrz
@somthing_happened

Opening soon: Make Yourself at Home, the annual first-year MFA exhibition, featuring the works of Andrew Catanese, Tina Kashiwagi, Liz Maelane, Krystal Ramirez, and Oleg Savunov.

Stay tuned!

@andrewcatanese
@ti.michi
@unitedstatesofsouthafrica
@krystalrmrz
@somthing_happened

Jamie Seney’s “Repo/possession” is one of the works featured in 404: Space Not Found, the 2021 Undergraduate Honors Thes...
04/23/2021

Jamie Seney’s “Repo/possession” is one of the works featured in 404: Space Not Found, the 2021 Undergraduate Honors Thesis Exhibition.

Jamie is an interdisciplinary artist working primarily in drawing and video art. Their work investigates the dynamics of rural poverty through their own experiences in Helena, Montana, and Omaha, Nebraska. Especially interested in the quotidian subtleties of poverty during childhood, the “if you know you know” moments, Jamie works to put a spotlight on these overlooked facets.

“Repo/possession” is a visual prayer book and altar, as well as the first piece within the series “Repo.” Jamie overlays vellum onto toned mixed media paper to produce two individual drawings that also forge a ghostly connection; see some pages here.

Explore “Repo/possession,” and all of the works from our six graduating students, at artexhibitions.stanford.edu/404-space-not-found; link in our bio.

Thank you to @jamieseney @jamieseney.art for sharing their work!

Images:
Repo/possession. Leather, ink, charcoal, vellum, toned paper. 9”x12”.

Congratulations to our six students of art practice with honors, who presented their works in 404: Space Not Found, the ...
04/17/2021

Congratulations to our six students of art practice with honors, who presented their works in 404: Space Not Found, the Undergraduate Honors Thesis Exhibition. The culmination of the yearlong honors thesis program in art practice, this group exhibition showcases works by:

Benny Siam
Lorena Diosdado
Sarah Ondak
Jamie Seney
Noah DeWald
Nan Munger

Today, they spoke about their practice in an online opening with curator Xiaoze Xie and our exhibitions team Gabriel Harrison and Garth Fry. Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to our students!

View the show at artexhibitions.stanford.edu/404-space-not-found, link in bio.

Congratulations to our six students of art practice with honors, who presented their works in 404: Space Not Found, the Undergraduate Honors Thesis Exhibition. The culmination of the yearlong honors thesis program in art practice, this group exhibition showcases works by:

Benny Siam
Lorena Diosdado
Sarah Ondak
Jamie Seney
Noah DeWald
Nan Munger

Today, they spoke about their practice in an online opening with curator Xiaoze Xie and our exhibitions team Gabriel Harrison and Garth Fry. Thank you to all who attended, and congratulations to our students!

View the show at artexhibitions.stanford.edu/404-space-not-found, link in bio.

404: space not found, the Undergraduate Honors Thesis Exhibition, opens online on Friday, April 16. The group show featu...
04/15/2021

404: space not found, the Undergraduate Honors Thesis Exhibition, opens online on Friday, April 16. The group show features works by six students of the yearlong honors thesis program in art practice, including Benny Siam. In their own words:

hi everyone! my name is benny and i’m a senior studying art practice and femgen. i’ve been living on campus for the entire year and let me tell you, making art on campus for the past three quarters has been weird. evgr is where i eat sleep and make art. im also a nonbinary person of color. making art is how i survive as a trans person. so i really want to take the time to acknowledge the really difficult things that have been going on in many of our communities. but for now, my room in evgr at two in the morning will be enough. my roommate who is also my bestie is a dancer. so like clockwork we transform space from art to dance studio and back again daily. to think of all the art made in this building.

Join us on Friday at 3 pm PT for the online opening and student presentations, learn more and register at the link in our bio.

Thank you to @bennysiam for sharing their work and words!

Images:
“look at ME strawberry blonde (she’s really good!)”
“strawberry goth says ‘as if!’”
“choose your fighter: colonize this!”
Digital photo-collage of archival autoethnographic digital and film photographic images, 24"x36", 2021.

Congratulations to our very own Professor Enrique Chagoya, who was recently awarded a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship. With h...
04/12/2021
Seven Stanford scholars awarded Guggenheim Fellowships - Stanford Today

Congratulations to our very own Professor Enrique Chagoya, who was recently awarded a 2021 Guggenheim Fellowship. With his fellowship, Chagoya plans to develop new work related to social and racial inequality that the COVID-19 pandemic and protests following the death of George Floyd made painfully clear.

“Art may not save the world by itself, but it may help us to think more creatively and may help us fight for a better and more humanistic future with respect for the lives of our own and the life on the planet,” Chagoya said in his statement to the Guggenheim.

A big congratulations to Professor Chagoya!

Read more: https://news.stanford.edu/today/2021/04/09/seven-stanford-scholars-awarded-guggenheim-fellowships/

Among those honored with 2021 Guggenheim Fellowships are R. Lanier Anderson, Vincent Barletta, Enrique Chagoya, Lochlann Jain, Amalia D. Kessler, Daniel Mason and Jonathan A. Rodden.

Seen here are works by students of winter quarter’s Drawing I, taught by Lauren A. Toomer.Open Studios is a long-running...
03/26/2021

Seen here are works by students of winter quarter’s Drawing I, taught by Lauren A. Toomer.

Open Studios is a long-running afternoon event that invites the Stanford community to explore the classrooms and studios of the McMurtry Building and Stanford Art Gallery, where works by undergraduate students are displayed.

This year, we are pleased to present Open Studios online, a showcase of the creative practice of our students during a remote winter 2021 quarter. See drawings, paintings, photographs, sculptures, and more: https://artexhibitions.stanford.edu/winter-open-studios

Drawings by Jacob Dunlop; Drew Gregory; Julia Simon; Tianyi (Joyce) Chen; Becky Gomez; and Sydnee Huff.

Last Thursday, Professor Jacqueline Stewart of @uchicagocms delivered the Department of Art and Art History’s annual Chr...
03/15/2021

Last Thursday, Professor Jacqueline Stewart of @uchicagocms delivered the Department of Art and Art History’s annual Christensen Distinguished Lecture. Professor Stewart spoke on Still a Brother: Inside the Negro Middle Class, a 1968 documentary by William Greaves.

Her lecture focused on the Black women captured mostly silently by Greaves’s camera (including wives, workers, ladies, activists, and intellectuals), “to consider the host of subterranean stories about gender and sexuality that live inside of this inside look at Negro class mobility and identity in transition.”

Thank you to Professor Stewart, and to all who attended!

Last Thursday, Professor Jacqueline Stewart of @uchicagocms delivered the Department of Art and Art History’s annual Christensen Distinguished Lecture. Professor Stewart spoke on Still a Brother: Inside the Negro Middle Class, a 1968 documentary by William Greaves.

Her lecture focused on the Black women captured mostly silently by Greaves’s camera (including wives, workers, ladies, activists, and intellectuals), “to consider the host of subterranean stories about gender and sexuality that live inside of this inside look at Negro class mobility and identity in transition.”

Thank you to Professor Stewart, and to all who attended!

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