UDC Music Program

UDC Music Program http://www.udc.edu/programs/music_bm http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCH-KUVN7PNehsCu6nlU1XSw This page features performances by the talented students and faculty of the Music Department of the University of the District of Columbia.
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Whether you're a high school student looking to continue formal training or a pro musician seeking a degree after years honing your craft on the road, the University of the District of Columbia is the place to extend your musical training and join a vibrant community of performers and educators. With a diverse curriculum and personal attention, the UDC bachelor's degree program in music provides professional training and performance opportunities to help you become a skilled, creative contributor to the field. UDC serves as a cultural resource to the D.C. music community, hosting a world-renowned jazz archives, organizing an acclaimed annual big band festival as well as other music-related outreach, research and performance programs. We prepare our students to give back to that community as both educators and performers. UDC’s music program has a long and rich history in the D.C. community. UDC was the first in the nation and remains the only university in the D.C. area to offer a concentration in gospel music studies. Coupled with our classical and jazz offerings, UDC’s music program provides a wide range of opportunities that serve the educational and artistic needs of our community. In addition, we are home to the Felix E. Grant Jazz Archives, a world-class jazz research and resource center. The music program enjoys access to local and national resources such as the Washington Performing Arts Society’s Community Arts and Education programs, the Smithsonian Institution, the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and its education and outreach programs.

04/27/2020
'Kevin's Song' (K. Thompson)

We are continuing to create music, despite the temporary hiatus of live recitals. From UDC Orchestration Class, please enjoy this reading of UDC music major, Kevin Thompson's composition, 'Kevin's Song". Violinist, Sandy Choi, graciously agreed to perform and record the students' projects.

04/27/2020
'My Tribute' (To God Be The Glory) - Andraé Crouch; arr. D. Morgan

We are continuing to create music, despite the temporary hiatus of live recitals. From UDC Orchestration Class, please enjoy this reading of UDC music major, Derek Morgan's violin arrangement of the Andraé Crouch composition, 'To God be the Glory'. Violinist, Sandy Choi, graciously agreed to perform and record the students' projects.

04/27/2020
A Child is Born (by Thad Jones, arr. Asha Moore-Smith) - UDC Orchestration Class

We are continuing to create music, despite the temporary hiatus of live recitals. From UDC Orchestration Class, please enjoy this reading of UDC vocal student Asha Moore-Smith's violin arrangement of 'A Child is Born' (by Thad Jones, and chord voicings by the late Professor Calvin Jones). Violinist, Sandy Choi, graciously agreed to perform and record the students' projects. Professor Lewis Krauthamer is accompanying on piano.

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04/08/2020

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Wynton Marsalis
04/02/2020

Wynton Marsalis

My daddy passed away last night. We now join the worldwide family who are mourning grandfathers and grandmothers, mothers and fathers, sisters and brothers— kinfolk, friends, neighbors, colleagues, acquaintances and others.

What can one possibly say about loss in a time when there are many people losing folks that mean so much to them? One of my friends lost both her mother AND father just last week. We all grieve and experience things differently, and I’m sure each of my five brothers are feeling and dealing in their own way.

My daddy was a humble man with a lyrical sound that captured the spirit of place--New Orleans, the Crescent City, The Big Easy, the Curve. He was a stone-cold believer without extravagant tastes.
Like many parents, he sacrificed for us and made so much possible. Not only material things, but things of substance and beauty like the ability to hear complicated music and to read books; to see and to contemplate art; to be philosophical and kind, but to also understand that a time and place may require a pugilistic-minded expression of ignorance.

His example for all of us who were his students (a big extended family from everywhere), showed us to be patient and to want to learn and to respect teaching and thinking and to embrace the joy of seriousness. He taught us that you could be conscious and stand your ground with an opinion rooted ‘in something’ even if it was overwhelmingly unfashionable. And that if it mattered to someone, it mattered.

I haven’t cried because the pain is so deep....it doesn’t even hurt. He was absolutely my man. He knew how much I loved him, and I knew he loved me (though he was not given to any type of demonstrative expression of it). As a boy, I followed him on so many underpopulated gigs in unglamorous places, and there, in the passing years, learned what it meant to believe in the substance of a fundamental idea whose only verification was your belief.

I only ever wanted to do better things to impress HIM. He was my North Star and the only opinion that really deep down mattered to me was his because I grew up seeing how much he struggled and sacrificed to represent and teach vital human values that floated far above the stifling segregation and prejudice that defined his youth but, strangely enough, also imbued his art with an even more pungent and biting accuracy.

But for all of that, I guess he was like all of us; he did the best he could, did great things, had blind spots and made mistakes, fought with his spouse, had problems paying bills, worried about his kids and other people’s, rooted for losing teams, loved gumbo and red beans, and my momma’s pecan pie. But unlike a healthy portion of us, he really didn’t complain about stuff. No matter how bad it was.

A most fair-minded, large-spirited, generous, philanthropic (with whatever he had), open-minded person is gone. Ironically, when we spoke just 5 or 6 days ago about this precarious moment in the world and the many warnings he received ‘to be careful, because it wasn’t his time to pass from COVID’, he told me,” Man, I don’t determine the time. A lot of people are losing loved ones. Yours will be no more painful or significant than anybody else’s”.
That was him, “in a nutshell”, (as he would say before talking for another 15 minutes without pause).

In that conversation, we didn’t know that we were prophesying. But he went out soon after as he lived—-without complaint or complication. The nurse asked him, “Are you breathing ok?” as the oxygen was being steadily increased from 3 to 8, to too late, he replied, ”Yeah. I’m fine.”

For me, there is no sorrow only joy. He went on down the Good Kings Highway as was his way, a jazz man, “with grace and gratitude.”
And I am grateful to have known him.

- Wynton

University of the District of Columbia
03/31/2020

University of the District of Columbia

This update is notification to students, faculty and employees regarding the extension of UDC’s modified operating status until April 27, 2020. During this period, the University will continue to offer remote instruction and will remain open for business to deliver services through an expanded telework schedule.
• Students should not return to campus until April 27.
• All face-to-face campus events are cancelled.
• Land-grant classes are suspended until April 27, 2020.
• All Workforce Development and Continuing Education classes are suspended until April 27, 2020.
• Summer sessions will be offered as planned. Online registration begins on April 1, 2020.
• Commencement will not be held May 9. Alternate dates are being considered. #udc1851 #udcfirebirds #flattenthecurve

University of the District of Columbia
03/13/2020

University of the District of Columbia

We continue to monitor COVID-19 (coronavirus) developments. The Campus Task Force meets daily, and is working closely with District agencies to coordinate our response. On the recommendation of the Task Force, we are taking action. #UDC1851 #UDCfirebirds
.

Please continue to be vigilant about observing basic health protocols in order to protect yourselves, and help prevent the spread of the coronavirus in our community:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
• Stay home when you are sick.

03/13/2020

"In jazz criticism, no reliance on European tradition or theory will help at all. Negro music, like the Negro himself, is strictly an American phenomenon, and we have got to set up standards of judgment and aesthetic excellence that depend on our native knowledge and understanding of the underlying philosophies and local cultural references that produced blues and jazz in order to produce valid critical writing or commentary about it."

"Jazz and the White Critic" (1963)
- Amiri Baraka (1934-2014) American writer of poetry, drama, fiction, essays and music criticism

Van Ness Main Street
03/06/2020

Van Ness Main Street

The UDC Music Program presents a concert celebrating the accomplishments of African American Women in the arts through music, literature, and visual art. This interdisciplinary showcase will feature poems, solo piano, flute, and art songs- all written by phenomenal Black women from the past and present.

Please join them for a musical performance Monday, March 30th at 7:30 pm in the Theater of the Arts, 4200 Connecticut Ave NW, DC 20008. This event is free, and open to the community.

03/06/2020
'Minuet in G' - MUSC203 Vocal Quartet

Closing out this week's Student Recital are 4 students from 'Ear Training and Sight Singing 4' class, performing an arrangement of J.S. Bach's 'Minuet in G'. From left to right are Ashanae Jordan, Rebeca Molero, Victoria Williams and Ray Lamb.

03/05/2020
I Want To Be Ready (arr. McIntyre) - Malachi Johnson, tenor

In an excerpt from this week's Student Recital, Freshman vocal major Malachi Johnson, performs 'I Want to Be Ready', arranged by former UDC Music Professor, the late Phillip McIntyre. Mr. Johnson is a student of Professor Johnny Butler, and is accompanied in this performance by Dr. Leah Claiborne on piano.

03/05/2020
'La Maja Dolorosa, No.3' (Granados) - Rebeca Molero, mezzo-soprano

Sophomore vocal major Rebeca Molero, mezzo-soprano, performs Enrique Granados' 'La Maja Dolorosa, No. 3' on the first Student Recital of the semester. Ms. Molero is accompanied by Professor Lewis Krauthamer on piano and is a student of Professor Johnny Butler.

‪Today! Voice! Piano! Vocal Ensemble! Come and hear our talented students! Free admission! Recital Hall of the Performin...
03/03/2020

‪Today! Voice! Piano! Vocal Ensemble! Come and hear our talented students! Free admission! Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building. ‬

JAZZforum: MONDAY, March 2 @ 7pm. Musician and educator Fred Irby III has been a member of the Howard University Departm...
02/28/2020

JAZZforum: MONDAY, March 2 @ 7pm. Musician and educator Fred Irby III has been a member of the Howard University Department of Music faculty and director of the internationally acclaimed Howard University Jazz Ensemble since 1974. He will discuss his distinguished career with veteran jazz broadcaster Rusty Hassan. UDC Recital Hall, Performing Arts-Bldg. 46W. 4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW. FREE.

02/28/2020

"The body of spirituals contained a wide variety of ornaments derived from African vocal music. Just as Africans had decorated their bodies for dance and their instruments for effects, so had they maintained a continuous tradition of vocal decoration. Early explorers wrote of this fascinating aspect of African music before American colonialism, and the practice did not end with the arrival of Africans in America. Aside from the rhythmic influence, improvised inflections of African origin have influenced American music more than any other element."
- Hildred Roach, Retired Professor of Music, University of the District of Columbia; 'Spirituals', Black American Music: Past and Present, 2nd Edition, Krieger Publishing Company, Malabar, Florida, 1994; p. 28-29.

#UDCBHM2020 #BLACKHISTORYMONTH #FIREBIRDS1851

02/24/2020

"If a basic theoretical concept of a black aesthetic can be drawn from the history of the black experience in America, the crystallization of this concept is embodied in Afro-American gospel music. The cultural traditions and ideals of West Africa are the ultimate source from which the basic concept of a black aesthetic definition is derived. There are many aspects of black American culture, such as folktales, speech patterns, religious beliefs and musical practices, which reveal connecting links to African roots in subtle and sometimes obvious ways...Black gospel music, a synthesis of West African and Afro-America music, dance, poetry and drama, is a body of urban contemporary black religious music of rural folk origins which is a celebration of the Christ experience of salvation and hope. It is at the same time a declaration of black selfhood which is expressed through the very personal medium...in the broad spectrum of Afro-American arts which retain roots of the African heritage, black gospel music has the unique position of close proximity to purely African related origins. It is that which is instantly heard and felt in the presence of the gospel sight-and-sound experience.”

- the late Dr. Pearl Williams-Jones (Author of the Gospel Music Studies Curriculum in the Music Department at The University of the District of Columbia); ‘Afro- American Gospel Music: A Crystallization of the Black Aesthetic’, Ethnomusicology, Vol. 19, No. 3; Sept. 1975, pp. 373-385.

#UDCBHM2020 #BLACKHISTORYMONTH #FIREBIRDS1851

The University of the District of Columbia Chorale 2019/2020
02/21/2020

The University of the District of Columbia Chorale 2019/2020

Next Tuesday, Feb 25 in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building, come and see the Small Jazz Ensemble, directed...
02/19/2020

Next Tuesday, Feb 25 in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building, come and see the Small Jazz Ensemble, directed by Professor Allyn Johnson, perform music in tribute to Black History Month. Free admission!

02/12/2020
'Give Me No Body Without Your Soul' (from 'Blue Steel') - Victoria Williams, soprano

From yesterday's recital dedicated to African-American composers, here is Vocal Performance major, Victoria Williams performing Neola's aria, 'Give Me No Body Without Your Soul' from William Grant Still's unpublished opera, 'Blue Steel'. Ms. Williams is accompanied by Professor Lewis Krauthamer on piano and is a student of Professor Nelda Ormond.

On Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at 12:30pm in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building, the UDC Music Program will...
02/06/2020

On Tuesday, February 18, 2020 at 12:30pm in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building, the UDC Music Program will feature a Faculty Recital. Professor Johnny Butler, baritone, accompanied by Dr. Leah Claiborne on piano will present, ‘Life, Love and Eternity’: A Recital of Art Songs by African American Composers. A commissioned art song by composer Evelyn Simpson-Curenton will be premiered. Free Admission.

Come and enjoy our talented students as they present concert repertoire by African-American composers. Works by Thomas K...
01/28/2020

Come and enjoy our talented students as they present concert repertoire by African-American composers. Works by Thomas Kerr, Betty Jackson King, Margaret Bonds and Moses Hogan, to name a few, will be performed. Tuesday, February 11 at 12.30 pm in the Recital Hall of the Performing Arts Building. Free Admission!

01/20/2020

"The nation is sick. Trouble is in the land. Confusion all around. That's a strange statement. But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough, can you see the stars." — Dr Martin Luther King Jr

Join the HBCU Council of Shiloh Baptist Church on February 23, 2020 for HBCU Sunday 2020 - Celebrating 17 Years of HBCU ...
01/15/2020

Join the HBCU Council of Shiloh Baptist Church on February 23, 2020 for HBCU Sunday 2020 - Celebrating 17 Years of HBCU Excellence! Our Guest Preacher for both services (7:45am & 10:55am) will be the Reverend Dr. Frank A. Thomas (Nettie Sweeney and Hugh Th. Miller Professor of Homiletics and Director of the Academy of Preaching and Celebration at Christian Theological Seminary, Indianapolis, Indiana) and our guest choir will be the University of the District of Columbia Chorale, under the direction of Richard C. Odom (Director), Johnny Butler (Assistant Director), and Dr. Leah Claiborne (Accompanist).

Founded in 2003, The HBCU Council of Shiloh Baptist Church was formed to raise awareness regarding Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) and to provide HBCU access to generations of new students. The HBCU Council is based in Washington D.C. with members and sister entities nationwide. We provide community education and access to college, scholarships, SAT and college board test preparation and a host of celebratory HBCU services. The HBCU Council also hosts concerts and social events, for the purposes of raising money to support our HBCUs.

For more information about the 17th Anniversary Celebration of HBCU Sunday, please call 202-524-2696, visit our website (www.hbcucouncil.com) or follow us on Social Media (HBCUCouncilDC – Facebook, Twitter, Instagram).

Address

4200 Connecticut Avenue, NW, Building 46-West
Washington D.C., DC
20008

Opening Hours

Monday 09:00 - 19:00
Tuesday 09:00 - 19:00
Wednesday 09:00 - 19:00
Thursday 09:00 - 19:00
Friday 09:00 - 19:00

Telephone

(202) 274-5803

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Whether you're a graduating high school student looking to continue formal training, returning to college after time off, or a professional musician seeking a degree after years of performing on the road, the University of the District of Columbia is the place to extend your musical training and join a vibrant community of performers and educators. With a diverse curriculum and personal attention, the UDC bachelor's degree program in music provides professional training and performance opportunities to help you become a skilled, creative contributor to the field. UDC serves as a cultural resource to the D.C. music community, hosting a world-renowned jazz archives, organizing an acclaimed annual big band festival as well as other music-related outreach, research and performance programs. We prepare our students to give back to that community as both educators and performers. UDC’s music program has a long and rich history in the D.C. community. UDC was the first in the nation and remains the only university in the D.C. area to offer a concentration in gospel music studies. Coupled with our classical and jazz offerings, UDC’s music program provides a wide range of opportunities that serve the educational and artistic needs of our community. In addition, we are home to the Felix E. Grant Jazz Archives, a world-class jazz research and resource center. The music program enjoys access to local and national resources such as the Washington Performing Arts Society’s Community Arts and Education programs, the Smithsonian Institution, the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz and the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts and its education and outreach programs.

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